Discussion:
Chris & Lorna (Part 1) - by Naresh Fernandes - MansWorld magazine July 2003
(too old to reply)
Cecil Pinto
2003-08-09 09:44:31 UTC
Permalink
Love and longing in Mumbai?s Jazz Age (Part 1 of 3 Parts)
by Naresh Fernandes - MansWorld magazine July 2003



For over five decades, well into the late 1960s before prohibition,
taxation and rock-and-roll killed it, Mumbai boasted of one of the most
vibrant jazz scenes in the world, outside of the US. On Churchgate Street,
stretching from the Marine Drive sea front all the way up to Flora
Fountain the sound of jazz spilled out through the doors of packed night
clubs like Ambassador, Napoli, The Talk of the Town, Gaylord?s, Ritz,
Little Hut, Bistro and Volga. Not to speak of the Rendezvous at the Taj.
The legendary pianist and composer Dave Brubeck was impressed enough by the
local musicians to attempt to make some recordings during one of his
visits. Set against this backdrop is the tragic love affair of tenor
saxophonist and band leader Chris Perry and singer Lorna Cordeiro. Naresh
Fernandes tells their story for the first time.


---------


Their eyes give it away. Chris Perry wears a slick black jacket, the
sleeves of his crisp white shirt revealing the glint of dark cuff links.
His fingers clasp a gleaming tenor saxophone with a lover?s
gentleness. Arms crossed coquettishly above her waist, Lorna Cordeiro is
chic in a bouffant and a form-fitting gown that shows a flash of ankle.
They stare into each other?s eyes, mesmerised. Behind them looms a giant
camera aperture borrowed from the opening sequence of the Bond films.

You couldn?t miss the poster as you sauntered down Jamshetji Tata Road in
downtown Bombay. It hung outside the Astoria Hotel, across the street from
the octagonal Art Deco turret of Eros cinema, inviting the city to Chris
and Lorna?s daily shows at the Venice nightclub. It was 1971. India was
savouring its newfound place on the world?s stage. The country?s armed
forces had decisively liberated Bangladesh and the idealism of Independence
had welled up again. India?s middle classes were capturing their polyester
memories on Agfa Click IIIs that cost 46.50 rupees (taxes extra), aspiring
to the lifestyles of ?The Jet Set Air Hostesses? described in The
Illustrated Weekly of India (price: 85 paise), and being encouraged by
newspaper ads to ?Go gay with Gaylord fine filter cigarettes?.

As the City of Gold bubbled through its jazz age, Lorna and Chris
enthralled Bombay with their shows at Venice each night. Remo Fernandes,
who would go on to become the first Indian pop musician to record an album
of original English-language tunes, was among those locked in the spell.
?Two artists sometimes ignite a creative chemistry in each other which goes
beyond all logical explanation. Mere mortals can only look and listen in
awe,? he rhapsodised. ?In such duos, one plus one does not make two. It
makes a number so immeasurable, it defies all laws of calculus.?

But the sparks that flew at Venice gradually built into a roaring
conflagration. As Remo put it: ?Hyper-intense, high-temperament artistic
relationships often end in emotional disaster, like two comets when they
steer too dangerously close. Chris?s and Lorna?s, as we all know, was no
exception.?

Like the myths about the city in which they soared to fame, the tale of
Chris and Lorna has gained so much in the re-telling it?s sometimes
difficult to thresh the apocrypha from the actual. Thirty years after the
two stopped performing together, old-time musicians in the bylanes of Dhobi
Talao and Bandra still beg anonymity as they reminisce in sad whispers.

?He was shameless. He left his wife and three small children for that girl.?

?Chris and Lorna were in love. When they fought, they became mortal
enemies. He destroyed her and he destroyed himself.?

?She was very good singer. Beyond that, she was nothing. She got her break
with Chris Perry. He made contract with her. She couldn?t sing without his
permission. She had no brains, so she signed. Then he went back to his wife.?

?He didn?t let her perform with anyone else. He threatened to break the
legs of one Hindu fellow who tried to get her to sing with him.?

?She hit the bottle, men. She became an alcoholic and just disappeared.?

Chris Perry who was born Pereira died on January 25, 2002, his last years
hobbled by Parkinson?s disease. Lorna has refused to recount her version of
events for publication. But the fidelity of her contralto booming out of
our speakers, embroidered with Chris?s perfectly crafted sax filigrees,
speaks its own truth.


Ronnie Monserrate was 19 when he began to play Sunday gigs at Venice with
the Chris Perry band, sitting in for the regular pianist. Venice had a
reputation. It was the jazzman?s jazz haunt, the rendezvous for musicians
from around the country and occasionally from around the world. Dave
Brubeck swung by when he visited Bombay in 1958, as Duke Ellington had when
his band set out on their famous world tour of 1963. As Ronnie tells it,
the dapper Chris Perry was the musician?s musician: ?He had perfect pitch.
He was an arranger, a composer, a player.? Chris played both trumpet and
saxophone, sometimes switching from one to the other mid-tune, a feat that
required elaborate lip control. His trumpet tone was broad and true. He
didn?t have flashy technique, but the notes he coaxed out of his horn had a
mellowness that kept the fans coming back night after night.

Chris was 43 at the time, Lorna was 25. No one seems quite sure exactly how
they met, but everyone?s agreed that he groomed her into one of the
Bombay?s finest crooners. One version maintains that Lorna got her break
when still in school, after she won the Connie Francis soundalike
competition at Metro cinema. This prompted a musician named Raymond
Albuqerque to invite her to sing in his show at the Bandra Fair. Her
rendition of Underneath the Mango Tree got the crowds so fired up that
Chris Perry, already an established performer, went to her home to audition
her. She was just 16 when she joined Perry?s band.

A vocalist in the Shirley Bassey mould, Lorna belted out every tune like it
was her last time on stage. ?She had a lot of black feel,? is how Ronnie
describes her performances. ?You could see the intensity when she was on
stage. She?d give it her best, every time. She was like a magnet. You
couldn?t help but be attracted to her when she was on stage. And with Chris
Perry band by her side, it was like magic happening. There was incredible
attraction. There was a lot of love in the interaction. It was apparent in
their body language. They brought out the best in each other. They?d look
into each other?s eyes and their understanding was so great that there?d be
spontaneous combustion.?

Offstage, though, things could get awkward. Any man attempting to talk to
Lorna was liable to get a taste of Perry?s famously volatile fists. During
breaks, the musicians would sit around their table, absolutely silent.
?They were jolly people but they were afraid to laugh around Chris,? Ronnie
says. Ronnie was the only exception, perhaps because his youth made him
seem unthreatening. Two decades later, he?d find opportunity to call in
that bond of trust.

Venice was around the corner from Bombay?s swinging jazz strip, Churchgate
Street (now Veer Nariman Road). Pianists, trios and quartets were to be
heard all the way down the 200-metre thoroughfare as it led off from
Churchgate station to the Arabian Sea. First came Berry?s, with tandoori
butter chicken that was the stuff of Bombay legend and accomplished
piano-fronted groups led by Dorothy Jones and Stanley Pinto. Across the
fence was Bombelli?s, named after its Swiss owner, where a trio held sway
as ad men sipped cappuccinos. Then came the Ambassador, where Toni Pinto?s
quintet encapsulated Bombay?s diversity: the group had two Jews a singer
named Ephrim Elias and drummer Abie Cohen, an Anglo-Indian tenor
saxophonist named Norman Mobsby, and, in addition to Pinto, another Goan,
the bassist Clement Furtado.

Pinto?s kingdom was named the Other Room, so called because after the rich
and famous had finished drinking at the bar, they?d say, ?Let?s go to the
other room.? He ruled for 16 years from 1958, his sharply dressed group
spinning out hard-driving bop and light classics, and playing back-up for
cabarets and visiting acrobats, magicians and flamenco dancers. The
Ambassador was owned by the cigar-chomping Jack Voyantzis, an ebullient
Greek who was assisted by his brother, Socrates. The siblings had started
their subcontinental journey in Rangoon, opened a caf? in Delhi, and
finally found their way to Bombay, where they transformed a hotel known as
the Argentinian into the Ambassador. The cream of Bombay society turned out
to catch Toni?s tightly-rehearsed band. Toni remembers once looking up from
his piano to see three of the city?s leading editors appreciatively tapping
their feet: Rusi Karanjia, editor of the left-wing tabloid Blitz, D F
Karaka, editor of the rival Current, and Frank Moraes, editor of the Indian
Express, with his American girlfriend. Another time, as the band was going
through its routine, Toni realised that someone from the back of the room
was playing along on a trumpet. It turned out to be American hornman Eddie
Calvert. ?He came for dinner one night even though he was staying at the
Ritz,? Toni says, and he asked his drummer, Bobby Hadrian, to go back and
get his instrument. Calvert and Toni?s band jammed for an hour, playing
the tunes the American had made famous: Cherry Pink, Begin the Beguine,
Wonderland by Night.

Elsewhere on Churchgate Street, music spilled out through the doors of the
Napoli, The Talk of the Town and Gaylord?s. Opposite Venice, there was jazz
at the Ritz, while at the Little Hut, Neville Thomas led a group calling
itself Three Guys and a Doll. Past Flora Fountain stood Bistro and Volga,
home to a quartet led by the grandfatherly baritone saxophonist Hecke
Kingdom.

Dave Brubeck was impressed enough by the local musicians to attempt to make
some recordings with them during his visit. But Bombay defeated him. He
later recounted the episode to an interviewer: ?The current fluctuated in
Bombay in those days and so the tape would speed up and slow down. Like,
when you were shaving, the speed of the motor would go up and down. It
ruined one of my favourite tapes I've ever made.? Another visiting jazzman,
the pianist Hampton Hawes, was overwhelmed by problems that were rather
more basic. ?Bombay turned me around,? he wrote. ?I?d never seen poverty
before.? Art, he decided, was irrelevant amidst the gnawing deprivation.
?Here I was thinking about making a big splash, a hit record, going home a
hero, and I?m walking the streets with motherfuckers who don?t even know
what a piece of bread is, let along Stravinsky or Charlie Parker. If Bird
was alive and played for them they wouldn?t be able to hear him because
they?d be too damn hungry.?

Admittedly, jazz had always been the preserve of Bombay?s elite. But while
the audiences were upper crust, the musicians who cooked up the syncopated
rhythms were not. Like Toni Pinto, Ronnie Monserrate, Chris and Lorna, the
majority were Roman Catholics strivers from the former Portuguese colony of
Goa, 550 kilometres south of Bombay. They?d been an important part of the
Bombay music scene since the 1920s, when Bombay began to develop its
appetite for what was then called ?hot music?. Jazz had made its way from
New Orleans in the waxy grooves of phonograph records and travelled over
the oceans with touring American bands that played for the administrators
of the Raj. Bombay?s first jazz concerts were performed at the Bandstand,
south of the Oval. Among the earliest jazzmen to play an extended stint in
Bombay was Leon Abbey, a violinist from Minnesota, who led an eight-piece
band at the Taj during the 1935-?36 season. Abbey wore white tails on stage
and played the freshest sounds. He told one interviewer, ?I kept up with
the latest numbers because someone would always come up to the bandstand
and say, ?Old Bean, would you play so and so
?, because as far as he was
concerned, we should know how to play everything that had ever been
written.? Midway through the trip, the Taj management sent Abbey and
saxophonist Art Lanier back to New York to pick up the latest music.

Abbey?s outfit was replaced by the Symphonians, fronted by the cornet
player Cricket Smith. Smith had been featured on the seminal recordings
made by James Reese Europe?s Society Orchestra in 1913 and 1914, capturing
jazz at the moment of its transition from the relatively unsophisticated
ragtime style. Smith ?signed his contract for a fixed amount of money and
two Coronas a day, so every day, the manager would have to bring him his
cigars?, recalls Luis Moreno, a Spanish trumpet player who lived in Bombay
for 20 years. ?He was a character.?

In 1938, pianist Teddy Weatherford, who had played with Louis Armstrong,
took the stage with his men. His swinging style and treble voicing had been
an important influence on jazz during its formative years. The Taj, it
would seem, wasn?t quite the genteel venue it now is not at least from
the way Weatherford?s occasional Russian bassist named ?Innocent Nick?
described the gigs to the jazz magazine Storyville. ?Teddy used to play
downstairs, in the Tavern of the Taj, for the soldiers, sailors and others,
a very rough place,? Nick said. ?Teddy would play for hours without a
break. Even with drinks, he would continue one-handed. He had tremendous
hands.?

For the African-American musicians, Bombay provided refuge from the
apartheid in the U.S. Men like Weatherford and his sidemen, such as the
saxophonist Roy Butler, spent long years shuttling between Europe and the
subcontinent, where racial barriers seemed non-existent, at least for them.
Butler?s years in India as a Weatherford sideman, he told Storyville, were
among his happiest the work was relatively easy, the pay and conditions
good, he was treated splendidly by both management and clientele, and
enjoyed the luxurious life under the British Raj. The Taj management, on
its part, honoured Weatherford by naming a dish after him: Poires Glace
Weatherford. (The absence of colour prejudice was only to be expected.
After all, industrial baron Jamshetji Tata was moved to build the Taj after
being prevented one leisurely Bombay evening from dining at the
Europeans-only Pyrke?s Apollo Hotel. Later, he famously hung a notice in
the Taj forbidding entry to South Africans and dogs.)

Weatherford?s sidemen were an eclectic lot and opened Bombay?s ears to a
wealth of new sounds, the Cuban drumming of Luis Pedroso and the Spanish
brass of Luis Moreno, among them. Butler, who was known as the Reverend in
acknowledgement of his abstemious ways, helped Weatherford drill the band.
Moreno characterised Butler as the ?gentleman of the orchestra?. Moreno
added, ?He never drank in his life and if someone said, ?How about a round
of drink?? Roy would say, ?I?ll have an ice-cream. You enjoy beer, I enjoy
ice-cream.? Butler went on to lead his own band at Greens, located where
the Taj Intercontinental now stands.

Both Weatherford (who married an Anglo-Indian woman, before dying of
cholera in Calcutta in 1945, aged 41) and Butler recruited Goan sidemen,
plugging Bombay into the source of jazz. The trumpet player Frank Fernand,
who played in Weatherford band with his Goan compatriots, Micky Correa and
Josique Menzies, says that his stint with the American taught him to ?play
like a negro?. Moreno helped Fernand develop the ability to hit long, high
notes, eventually extending his range up to E flat. Butler, it must be
noted, was less than thrilled with his Goan employees. ?My short stretch as
a bandleader in India was not too earth-shaking,? he told Storyville. ?The
local musicians were not too familiar with jazz at that time. I understood
that there are some very good jazzmen out there now, but the time was too
short for anything to develop, good or bad.? For their part, some of the
Goan musicians weren?t overly impressed with Butler, either. They believed
his decision to stay in India was motivated by the fear that he wouldn?t
find work in the US. As Fernand put it, ?The faltu fellows stayed, the good
ones went home.?





----
Continued in Part 2
----





This article in Word format was sent to me, on request, by the Editor of
MansWorld Magazine, N.Radhakrishnan, thus saving me the trouble of typing
it out. Please reciprocate his good gesture by visiting the site
http://www.mansworldindia.com


Cheers!

Cecil


====
Gilbert Lawrence
2003-08-09 16:57:01 UTC
Permalink
Hi all,

Great articles on the Goan culture in Bombay in the 1950-1970 and
beyond.
I do wish Bernard Colaco of ?UK / ?Macau and Constantino Xavier of
Portugal will read these articles and know about Goan culture and the
artists in the Bombay / Mumbai Diaspora. Regards, GL

-----Original Message-----
From: goanet-admin at goanet.org [mailto:goanet-admin at goanet.org] On Behalf
Of Cecil Pinto
Sent: Saturday, August 09, 2003 5:45 AM
To: Goa-Goans at yahoogroups.com; konkaniforum at yahoogroups.com
Cc: aldona-net at yahoogroups.com; goanet at goanet.org
Subject: [aldona-net] [Goanet]Chris & Lorna (Part 1) - by Naresh
Fernandes - MansWorld magazine July 2003

Love and longing in Mumbai?s Jazz Age (Part 1 of 3 Parts)
by Naresh Fernandes - MansWorld magazine July 2003



For over five decades, well into the late 1960s before prohibition,
taxation and rock-and-roll killed it, Mumbai boasted of one of the most
vibrant jazz scenes in the world, outside of the US. On Churchgate
Street,
stretching from the Marine Drive sea front all the way up to Flora
Fountain the sound of jazz spilled out through the doors of packed
night
clubs like Ambassador, Napoli, The Talk of the Town, Gaylord?s, Ritz,
Little Hut, Bistro and Volga. Not to speak of the Rendezvous at the Taj.

The legendary pianist and composer Dave Brubeck was impressed enough by
the
local musicians to attempt to make some recordings during one of his
visits. Set against this backdrop is the tragic love affair of tenor
saxophonist and band leader Chris Perry and singer Lorna Cordeiro.
Naresh
Fernandes tells their story for the first time.


---------


Their eyes give it away. Chris Perry wears a slick black jacket, the
sleeves of his crisp white shirt revealing the glint of dark cuff links.

His fingers clasp a gleaming tenor saxophone with a lover?s
gentleness. Arms crossed coquettishly above her waist, Lorna Cordeiro
is
chic in a bouffant and a form-fitting gown that shows a flash of ankle.
They stare into each other?s eyes, mesmerised. Behind them looms a giant

camera aperture borrowed from the opening sequence of the Bond films.

You couldn?t miss the poster as you sauntered down Jamshetji Tata Road
in
downtown Bombay. It hung outside the Astoria Hotel, across the street
from
the octagonal Art Deco turret of Eros cinema, inviting the city to Chris

and Lorna?s daily shows at the Venice nightclub. It was 1971. India was
savouring its newfound place on the world?s stage. The country?s armed
forces had decisively liberated Bangladesh and the idealism of
Independence
had welled up again. India?s middle classes were capturing their
polyester
memories on Agfa Click IIIs that cost 46.50 rupees (taxes extra),
aspiring
to the lifestyles of ?The Jet Set Air Hostesses? described in The
Illustrated Weekly of India (price: 85 paise), and being encouraged by
newspaper ads to ?Go gay with Gaylord fine filter cigarettes?.

As the City of Gold bubbled through its jazz age, Lorna and Chris
enthralled Bombay with their shows at Venice each night. Remo Fernandes,

who would go on to become the first Indian pop musician to record an
album
of original English-language tunes, was among those locked in the spell.

?Two artists sometimes ignite a creative chemistry in each other which
goes
beyond all logical explanation. Mere mortals can only look and listen in

awe,? he rhapsodised. ?In such duos, one plus one does not make two. It
makes a number so immeasurable, it defies all laws of calculus.?

But the sparks that flew at Venice gradually built into a roaring
conflagration. As Remo put it: ?Hyper-intense, high-temperament artistic

relationships often end in emotional disaster, like two comets when they

steer too dangerously close. Chris?s and Lorna?s, as we all know, was no

exception.?

Like the myths about the city in which they soared to fame, the tale of
Chris and Lorna has gained so much in the re-telling it?s sometimes
difficult to thresh the apocrypha from the actual. Thirty years after
the
two stopped performing together, old-time musicians in the bylanes of
Dhobi
Talao and Bandra still beg anonymity as they reminisce in sad whispers.

?He was shameless. He left his wife and three small children for that
girl.?

?Chris and Lorna were in love. When they fought, they became mortal
enemies. He destroyed her and he destroyed himself.?

?She was very good singer. Beyond that, she was nothing. She got her
break
with Chris Perry. He made contract with her. She couldn?t sing without
his
permission. She had no brains, so she signed. Then he went back to his
wife.?

?He didn?t let her perform with anyone else. He threatened to break the
legs of one Hindu fellow who tried to get her to sing with him.?

?She hit the bottle, men. She became an alcoholic and just disappeared.?

Chris Perry who was born Pereira died on January 25, 2002, his last
years
hobbled by Parkinson?s disease. Lorna has refused to recount her version
of
events for publication. But the fidelity of her contralto booming out of

our speakers, embroidered with Chris?s perfectly crafted sax filigrees,
speaks its own truth.


Ronnie Monserrate was 19 when he began to play Sunday gigs at Venice
with
the Chris Perry band, sitting in for the regular pianist. Venice had a
reputation. It was the jazzman?s jazz haunt, the rendezvous for
musicians
from around the country and occasionally from around the world. Dave
Brubeck swung by when he visited Bombay in 1958, as Duke Ellington had
when
his band set out on their famous world tour of 1963. As Ronnie tells it,

the dapper Chris Perry was the musician?s musician: ?He had perfect
pitch.
He was an arranger, a composer, a player.? Chris played both trumpet and

saxophone, sometimes switching from one to the other mid-tune, a feat
that
required elaborate lip control. His trumpet tone was broad and true. He
didn?t have flashy technique, but the notes he coaxed out of his horn
had a
mellowness that kept the fans coming back night after night.

Chris was 43 at the time, Lorna was 25. No one seems quite sure exactly
how
they met, but everyone?s agreed that he groomed her into one of the
Bombay?s finest crooners. One version maintains that Lorna got her break

when still in school, after she won the Connie Francis soundalike
competition at Metro cinema. This prompted a musician named Raymond
Albuqerque to invite her to sing in his show at the Bandra Fair. Her
rendition of Underneath the Mango Tree got the crowds so fired up that
Chris Perry, already an established performer, went to her home to
audition
her. She was just 16 when she joined Perry?s band.

A vocalist in the Shirley Bassey mould, Lorna belted out every tune like
it
was her last time on stage. ?She had a lot of black feel,? is how Ronnie

describes her performances. ?You could see the intensity when she was
on
stage. She?d give it her best, every time. She was like a magnet. You
couldn?t help but be attracted to her when she was on stage. And with
Chris
Perry band by her side, it was like magic happening. There was
incredible
attraction. There was a lot of love in the interaction. It was apparent
in
their body language. They brought out the best in each other. They?d
look
into each other?s eyes and their understanding was so great that there?d
be
spontaneous combustion.?

Offstage, though, things could get awkward. Any man attempting to talk
to
Lorna was liable to get a taste of Perry?s famously volatile fists.
During
breaks, the musicians would sit around their table, absolutely silent.
?They were jolly people but they were afraid to laugh around Chris,?
Ronnie
says. Ronnie was the only exception, perhaps because his youth made him
seem unthreatening. Two decades later, he?d find opportunity to call in
that bond of trust.

Venice was around the corner from Bombay?s swinging jazz strip,
Churchgate
Street (now Veer Nariman Road). Pianists, trios and quartets were to be
heard all the way down the 200-metre thoroughfare as it led off from
Churchgate station to the Arabian Sea. First came Berry?s, with tandoori

butter chicken that was the stuff of Bombay legend and accomplished
piano-fronted groups led by Dorothy Jones and Stanley Pinto. Across the
fence was Bombelli?s, named after its Swiss owner, where a trio held
sway
as ad men sipped cappuccinos. Then came the Ambassador, where Toni
Pinto?s
quintet encapsulated Bombay?s diversity: the group had two Jews a
singer
named Ephrim Elias and drummer Abie Cohen, an Anglo-Indian tenor
saxophonist named Norman Mobsby, and, in addition to Pinto, another
Goan,
the bassist Clement Furtado.

Pinto?s kingdom was named the Other Room, so called because after the
rich
and famous had finished drinking at the bar, they?d say, ?Let?s go to
the
other room.? He ruled for 16 years from 1958, his sharply dressed group
spinning out hard-driving bop and light classics, and playing back-up
for
cabarets and visiting acrobats, magicians and flamenco dancers. The
Ambassador was owned by the cigar-chomping Jack Voyantzis, an ebullient
Greek who was assisted by his brother, Socrates. The siblings had
started
their subcontinental journey in Rangoon, opened a caf? in Delhi, and
finally found their way to Bombay, where they transformed a hotel known
as
the Argentinian into the Ambassador. The cream of Bombay society turned
out
to catch Toni?s tightly-rehearsed band. Toni remembers once looking up
from
his piano to see three of the city?s leading editors appreciatively
tapping
their feet: Rusi Karanjia, editor of the left-wing tabloid Blitz, D F
Karaka, editor of the rival Current, and Frank Moraes, editor of the
Indian
Express, with his American girlfriend. Another time, as the band was
going
through its routine, Toni realised that someone from the back of the
room
was playing along on a trumpet. It turned out to be American hornman
Eddie
Calvert. ?He came for dinner one night even though he was staying at the

Ritz,? Toni says, and he asked his drummer, Bobby Hadrian, to go back
and
get his instrument. Calvert and Toni?s band jammed for an hour, playing

the tunes the American had made famous: Cherry Pink, Begin the Beguine,
Wonderland by Night.

Elsewhere on Churchgate Street, music spilled out through the doors of
the
Napoli, The Talk of the Town and Gaylord?s. Opposite Venice, there was
jazz
at the Ritz, while at the Little Hut, Neville Thomas led a group calling

itself Three Guys and a Doll. Past Flora Fountain stood Bistro and
Volga,
home to a quartet led by the grandfatherly baritone saxophonist Hecke
Kingdom.

Dave Brubeck was impressed enough by the local musicians to attempt to
make
some recordings with them during his visit. But Bombay defeated him. He
later recounted the episode to an interviewer: ?The current fluctuated
in
Bombay in those days and so the tape would speed up and slow down. Like,

when you were shaving, the speed of the motor would go up and down. It
ruined one of my favourite tapes I've ever made.? Another visiting
jazzman,
the pianist Hampton Hawes, was overwhelmed by problems that were rather
more basic. ?Bombay turned me around,? he wrote. ?I?d never seen poverty

before.? Art, he decided, was irrelevant amidst the gnawing deprivation.

?Here I was thinking about making a big splash, a hit record, going home
a
hero, and I?m walking the streets with motherfuckers who don?t even know

what a piece of bread is, let along Stravinsky or Charlie Parker. If
Bird
was alive and played for them they wouldn?t be able to hear him because
they?d be too damn hungry.?

Admittedly, jazz had always been the preserve of Bombay?s elite. But
while
the audiences were upper crust, the musicians who cooked up the
syncopated
rhythms were not. Like Toni Pinto, Ronnie Monserrate, Chris and Lorna,
the
majority were Roman Catholics strivers from the former Portuguese colony
of
Goa, 550 kilometres south of Bombay. They?d been an important part of
the
Bombay music scene since the 1920s, when Bombay began to develop its
appetite for what was then called ?hot music?. Jazz had made its way
from
New Orleans in the waxy grooves of phonograph records and travelled over

the oceans with touring American bands that played for the
administrators
of the Raj. Bombay?s first jazz concerts were performed at the
Bandstand,
south of the Oval. Among the earliest jazzmen to play an extended stint
in
Bombay was Leon Abbey, a violinist from Minnesota, who led an
eight-piece
band at the Taj during the 1935-?36 season. Abbey wore white tails on
stage
and played the freshest sounds. He told one interviewer, ?I kept up with

the latest numbers because someone would always come up to the bandstand

and say, ?Old Bean, would you play so and so
?, because as far as he was

concerned, we should know how to play everything that had ever been
written.? Midway through the trip, the Taj management sent Abbey and
saxophonist Art Lanier back to New York to pick up the latest music.

Abbey?s outfit was replaced by the Symphonians, fronted by the cornet
player Cricket Smith. Smith had been featured on the seminal recordings
made by James Reese Europe?s Society Orchestra in 1913 and 1914,
capturing
jazz at the moment of its transition from the relatively unsophisticated

ragtime style. Smith ?signed his contract for a fixed amount of money
and
two Coronas a day, so every day, the manager would have to bring him his

cigars?, recalls Luis Moreno, a Spanish trumpet player who lived in
Bombay
for 20 years. ?He was a character.?

In 1938, pianist Teddy Weatherford, who had played with Louis Armstrong,

took the stage with his men. His swinging style and treble voicing had
been
an important influence on jazz during its formative years. The Taj, it
would seem, wasn?t quite the genteel venue it now is not at least from

the way Weatherford?s occasional Russian bassist named ?Innocent Nick?
described the gigs to the jazz magazine Storyville. ?Teddy used to play
downstairs, in the Tavern of the Taj, for the soldiers, sailors and
others,
a very rough place,? Nick said. ?Teddy would play for hours without a
break. Even with drinks, he would continue one-handed. He had tremendous

hands.?

For the African-American musicians, Bombay provided refuge from the
apartheid in the U.S. Men like Weatherford and his sidemen, such as the
saxophonist Roy Butler, spent long years shuttling between Europe and
the
subcontinent, where racial barriers seemed non-existent, at least for
them.
Butler?s years in India as a Weatherford sideman, he told Storyville,
were
among his happiest the work was relatively easy, the pay and conditions

good, he was treated splendidly by both management and clientele, and
enjoyed the luxurious life under the British Raj. The Taj management, on

its part, honoured Weatherford by naming a dish after him: Poires Glace
Weatherford. (The absence of colour prejudice was only to be expected.
After all, industrial baron Jamshetji Tata was moved to build the Taj
after
being prevented one leisurely Bombay evening from dining at the
Europeans-only Pyrke?s Apollo Hotel. Later, he famously hung a notice in

the Taj forbidding entry to South Africans and dogs.)

Weatherford?s sidemen were an eclectic lot and opened Bombay?s ears to a

wealth of new sounds, the Cuban drumming of Luis Pedroso and the Spanish

brass of Luis Moreno, among them. Butler, who was known as the Reverend
in
acknowledgement of his abstemious ways, helped Weatherford drill the
band.
Moreno characterised Butler as the ?gentleman of the orchestra?. Moreno
added, ?He never drank in his life and if someone said, ?How about a
round
of drink?? Roy would say, ?I?ll have an ice-cream. You enjoy beer, I
enjoy
ice-cream.? Butler went on to lead his own band at Greens, located where

the Taj Intercontinental now stands.

Both Weatherford (who married an Anglo-Indian woman, before dying of
cholera in Calcutta in 1945, aged 41) and Butler recruited Goan sidemen,

plugging Bombay into the source of jazz. The trumpet player Frank
Fernand,
who played in Weatherford band with his Goan compatriots, Micky Correa
and
Josique Menzies, says that his stint with the American taught him to
?play
like a negro?. Moreno helped Fernand develop the ability to hit long,
high
notes, eventually extending his range up to E flat. Butler, it must be
noted, was less than thrilled with his Goan employees. ?My short stretch
as
a bandleader in India was not too earth-shaking,? he told Storyville.
?The
local musicians were not too familiar with jazz at that time. I
understood
that there are some very good jazzmen out there now, but the time was
too
short for anything to develop, good or bad.? For their part, some of the

Goan musicians weren?t overly impressed with Butler, either. They
believed
his decision to stay in India was motivated by the fear that he wouldn?t

find work in the US. As Fernand put it, ?The faltu fellows stayed, the
good
ones went home.?





----
Continued in Part 2
----





This article in Word format was sent to me, on request, by the Editor of

MansWorld Magazine, N.Radhakrishnan, thus saving me the trouble of
typing
it out. Please reciprocate his good gesture by visiting the site
http://www.mansworldindia.com


Cheers!

Cecil


====



########################################################################
##
# Send submissions for Goanet to goanet at goanet.org
#
# PLEASE remember to stay on-topic (related to Goa), and avoid top-posts
#
# More details on Goanet at http://joingoanet.shorturl.com/
#
# Please keep your discussion/tone polite, to reflect respect to others
#
########################################################################
##

------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor ---------------------~-->
Low on Ink? Get 80% off inkjet cartridges & Free Shipping at
77Colors.com.
We have your brand: HP, Epson, Lexmark, Canon, Compaq and more!
http://www.c1tracking.com/l.asp?cid=5981
http://us.click.yahoo.com/DmnqpB/IyhGAA/ySSFAA/8XQrlB/TM
---------------------------------------------------------------------~->

To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
aldona-net-unsubscribe at yahoogroups.com



Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
Bernado Colaco
2003-08-10 03:49:37 UTC
Permalink
I wonder when Jazz music coming from capitalism was a
part of Goan culture? Ok, Sodam chintalim vehtelem
munon.... was a class act!

Cola?o
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
Hi all,
Great articles on the Goan culture in Bombay in the
1950-1970 and
beyond.
I do wish Bernard Colaco of ?UK / ?Macau and
Constantino Xavier of
Portugal will read these articles and know about
Goan culture and the
artists in the Bombay / Mumbai Diaspora. Regards, GL
===
__________________________________________________
Yahoo! Plus - For a better Internet experience
http://uk.promotions.yahoo.com/yplus/yoffer.html
Frederick Noronha (FN)
2003-08-11 04:34:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bernado Colaco
I wonder when Jazz music coming from capitalism was a
part of Goan culture? Ok, Sodam chintalim vehtelem
munon.... was a class act!
Cola?o
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
Hi all,
Great articles on the Goan culture in Bombay in the
1950-1970 and
beyond.
I do wish Bernard Colaco of ?UK / ?Macau and
Constantino Xavier of
Portugal will read these articles and know about
Goan culture and the
artists in the Bombay / Mumbai Diaspora. Regards, GL
Bernado at his usual xenophobic self. (Even if he hasn't explained his
real identity, and why he claims to be based in London while getting his
posts put out via Macau. Neither his claims to know what pre-1961 Goan
really was, while later claiming he was born post-1961.)

*What* is Goan culture? What is the culture of Goans today? Is it
something frozen in time? Is it something restricted to only one
language? (Prof Peter Nazareth comments that Goans write in 13
languages.)

If he follow Bernado's twisted logic of "cultural purity" we could next
be arguing that man originated in Goa...

Or is it something that today encompasses various continents, various
languages, and the influences that have come to set on this tiny place on
planet earth?

To one's mind, Goa is a melting pot (of various people, coming in at
different points of time, and various rulers or immigrants or invaders,
who have shaped the region into being what it is). We are a fruit salad
of sorts, and there's nothing wrong with that. Over the centuries,
different groups have been negotiating cultural and physical space with
each other, sometimes peacefully and sometimes violently.

As much as we claim to have wrong done to ourselves, if we dig deep enough
we'd find that our own groups have wronged others in the past.

The earlier we acknowledge this reality the better.

To argue that Jazz cannot have anything to do with Goa is a few steps away
from saying that the Mando cannot be really Goan, since it was first sung
only sometime around the nineteenth century and, in any case, has a range
of global influences ranging from the Portuguese and the European to the
Far East Asian costumes the women-singers wore. Or, it is close to an
argument that chief minister Parrikar recently repeated, that English
*cannot* be a legit language in Goa because of its foreign origins.

All stem from a similar set of insecurities, and a desire to dominate by
defining things in a way convenient to oneself.

FN
Frederick Noronha (FN)
2003-08-11 04:34:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bernado Colaco
I wonder when Jazz music coming from capitalism was a
part of Goan culture? Ok, Sodam chintalim vehtelem
munon.... was a class act!
Cola?o
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
Hi all,
Great articles on the Goan culture in Bombay in the
1950-1970 and
beyond.
I do wish Bernard Colaco of ?UK / ?Macau and
Constantino Xavier of
Portugal will read these articles and know about
Goan culture and the
artists in the Bombay / Mumbai Diaspora. Regards, GL
Bernado at his usual xenophobic self. (Even if he hasn't explained his
real identity, and why he claims to be based in London while getting his
posts put out via Macau. Neither his claims to know what pre-1961 Goan
really was, while later claiming he was born post-1961.)

*What* is Goan culture? What is the culture of Goans today? Is it
something frozen in time? Is it something restricted to only one
language? (Prof Peter Nazareth comments that Goans write in 13
languages.)

If he follow Bernado's twisted logic of "cultural purity" we could next
be arguing that man originated in Goa...

Or is it something that today encompasses various continents, various
languages, and the influences that have come to set on this tiny place on
planet earth?

To one's mind, Goa is a melting pot (of various people, coming in at
different points of time, and various rulers or immigrants or invaders,
who have shaped the region into being what it is). We are a fruit salad
of sorts, and there's nothing wrong with that. Over the centuries,
different groups have been negotiating cultural and physical space with
each other, sometimes peacefully and sometimes violently.

As much as we claim to have wrong done to ourselves, if we dig deep enough
we'd find that our own groups have wronged others in the past.

The earlier we acknowledge this reality the better.

To argue that Jazz cannot have anything to do with Goa is a few steps away
from saying that the Mando cannot be really Goan, since it was first sung
only sometime around the nineteenth century and, in any case, has a range
of global influences ranging from the Portuguese and the European to the
Far East Asian costumes the women-singers wore. Or, it is close to an
argument that chief minister Parrikar recently repeated, that English
*cannot* be a legit language in Goa because of its foreign origins.

All stem from a similar set of insecurities, and a desire to dominate by
defining things in a way convenient to oneself.

FN
Frederick Noronha (FN)
2003-08-11 04:34:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bernado Colaco
I wonder when Jazz music coming from capitalism was a
part of Goan culture? Ok, Sodam chintalim vehtelem
munon.... was a class act!
Cola?o
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
Hi all,
Great articles on the Goan culture in Bombay in the
1950-1970 and
beyond.
I do wish Bernard Colaco of ?UK / ?Macau and
Constantino Xavier of
Portugal will read these articles and know about
Goan culture and the
artists in the Bombay / Mumbai Diaspora. Regards, GL
Bernado at his usual xenophobic self. (Even if he hasn't explained his
real identity, and why he claims to be based in London while getting his
posts put out via Macau. Neither his claims to know what pre-1961 Goan
really was, while later claiming he was born post-1961.)

*What* is Goan culture? What is the culture of Goans today? Is it
something frozen in time? Is it something restricted to only one
language? (Prof Peter Nazareth comments that Goans write in 13
languages.)

If he follow Bernado's twisted logic of "cultural purity" we could next
be arguing that man originated in Goa...

Or is it something that today encompasses various continents, various
languages, and the influences that have come to set on this tiny place on
planet earth?

To one's mind, Goa is a melting pot (of various people, coming in at
different points of time, and various rulers or immigrants or invaders,
who have shaped the region into being what it is). We are a fruit salad
of sorts, and there's nothing wrong with that. Over the centuries,
different groups have been negotiating cultural and physical space with
each other, sometimes peacefully and sometimes violently.

As much as we claim to have wrong done to ourselves, if we dig deep enough
we'd find that our own groups have wronged others in the past.

The earlier we acknowledge this reality the better.

To argue that Jazz cannot have anything to do with Goa is a few steps away
from saying that the Mando cannot be really Goan, since it was first sung
only sometime around the nineteenth century and, in any case, has a range
of global influences ranging from the Portuguese and the European to the
Far East Asian costumes the women-singers wore. Or, it is close to an
argument that chief minister Parrikar recently repeated, that English
*cannot* be a legit language in Goa because of its foreign origins.

All stem from a similar set of insecurities, and a desire to dominate by
defining things in a way convenient to oneself.

FN
Frederick Noronha (FN)
2003-08-11 04:34:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bernado Colaco
I wonder when Jazz music coming from capitalism was a
part of Goan culture? Ok, Sodam chintalim vehtelem
munon.... was a class act!
Cola?o
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
Hi all,
Great articles on the Goan culture in Bombay in the
1950-1970 and
beyond.
I do wish Bernard Colaco of ?UK / ?Macau and
Constantino Xavier of
Portugal will read these articles and know about
Goan culture and the
artists in the Bombay / Mumbai Diaspora. Regards, GL
Bernado at his usual xenophobic self. (Even if he hasn't explained his
real identity, and why he claims to be based in London while getting his
posts put out via Macau. Neither his claims to know what pre-1961 Goan
really was, while later claiming he was born post-1961.)

*What* is Goan culture? What is the culture of Goans today? Is it
something frozen in time? Is it something restricted to only one
language? (Prof Peter Nazareth comments that Goans write in 13
languages.)

If he follow Bernado's twisted logic of "cultural purity" we could next
be arguing that man originated in Goa...

Or is it something that today encompasses various continents, various
languages, and the influences that have come to set on this tiny place on
planet earth?

To one's mind, Goa is a melting pot (of various people, coming in at
different points of time, and various rulers or immigrants or invaders,
who have shaped the region into being what it is). We are a fruit salad
of sorts, and there's nothing wrong with that. Over the centuries,
different groups have been negotiating cultural and physical space with
each other, sometimes peacefully and sometimes violently.

As much as we claim to have wrong done to ourselves, if we dig deep enough
we'd find that our own groups have wronged others in the past.

The earlier we acknowledge this reality the better.

To argue that Jazz cannot have anything to do with Goa is a few steps away
from saying that the Mando cannot be really Goan, since it was first sung
only sometime around the nineteenth century and, in any case, has a range
of global influences ranging from the Portuguese and the European to the
Far East Asian costumes the women-singers wore. Or, it is close to an
argument that chief minister Parrikar recently repeated, that English
*cannot* be a legit language in Goa because of its foreign origins.

All stem from a similar set of insecurities, and a desire to dominate by
defining things in a way convenient to oneself.

FN
Gabe Menezes
2003-08-10 17:22:05 UTC
Permalink
Sent: Saturday, August 09, 2003 10:44 AM
Subject: [Goanet]Chris & Lorna (Part 1) - by Naresh Fernandes - MansWorld
magazine July 2003


Love and longing in Mumbai's Jazz Age (Part 1 of 3 Parts)
by Naresh Fernandes - MansWorld magazine July 2003


RESPONSE:

A fantastically written article which not only sheds light on Chris Perry's
and Lorna's story but which also tells us about Bombay's famous jazz of
years gone by. To boot, it gives a history lesson on the migration of Goans
to Bombay and their occupations.

My father was born in Chadan Waddi (Dhobi Thalao). It was from here that he
emigrated as a young man to Nairobi, Kenya. The story goes that he was
always reminiscing about Bombay, so much so that he got given the nick name
Bomboikar. He is dead and gone now. If any one want to know my back ground
from Kenya I only have to tell them that I am Bomboikar's son and
immediately they know where I come from !

Cheers,

Gabe
Bernado Colaco
2003-08-11 12:01:11 UTC
Permalink
Since Goa is a potpouri of cultures let us now accept
capitalistic Jazz as a part of our culture (Thanks to
Goans in Mumbai). I hope this will solve the name
calling issue.:))

--- "Frederick Noronha (FN)" <fred at bytesforall.org>
wrote: > On Sun, 10 Aug 2003, [iso-8859-1] Bernado
Colaco
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
Post by Bernado Colaco
I wonder when Jazz music coming from capitalism
was a
Post by Bernado Colaco
part of Goan culture? Ok, Sodam chintalim vehtelem
munon.... was a class act!
Cola?o
--- Gilbert Lawrence <gilbertlaw at adelphia.net>
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
Hi all,
Great articles on the Goan culture in Bombay in
the
Post by Bernado Colaco
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
1950-1970 and
beyond.
I do wish Bernard Colaco of ?UK / ?Macau and
Constantino Xavier of
Portugal will read these articles and know about
Goan culture and the
artists in the Bombay / Mumbai Diaspora.
Regards, GL
Bernado at his usual xenophobic self. (Even if he
hasn't explained his
real identity, and why he claims to be based in
London while getting his
posts put out via Macau. Neither his claims to know
what pre-1961 Goan
really was, while later claiming he was born
post-1961.)
*What* is Goan culture? What is the culture of Goans
today? Is it
something frozen in time? Is it something restricted
to only one
language? (Prof Peter Nazareth comments that Goans
write in 13
languages.)
If he follow Bernado's twisted logic of "cultural
purity" we could next
be arguing that man originated in Goa...
Or is it something that today encompasses various
continents, various
languages, and the influences that have come to set
on this tiny place on
planet earth?
To one's mind, Goa is a melting pot (of various
people, coming in at
different points of time, and various rulers or
immigrants or invaders,
who have shaped the region into being what it is).
We are a fruit salad
of sorts, and there's nothing wrong with that. Over
the centuries,
different groups have been negotiating cultural and
physical space with
each other, sometimes peacefully and sometimes
violently.
As much as we claim to have wrong done to ourselves,
if we dig deep enough
we'd find that our own groups have wronged others in
the past.
The earlier we acknowledge this reality the better.
To argue that Jazz cannot have anything to do with
Goa is a few steps away
from saying that the Mando cannot be really Goan,
since it was first sung
only sometime around the nineteenth century and, in
any case, has a range
of global influences ranging from the Portuguese and
the European to the
Far East Asian costumes the women-singers wore. Or,
it is close to an
argument that chief minister Parrikar recently
repeated, that English
*cannot* be a legit language in Goa because of its
foreign origins.
All stem from a similar set of insecurities, and a
desire to dominate by
defining things in a way convenient to oneself.
FN
__________________________________________________
Yahoo! Plus - For a better Internet experience
http://uk.promotions.yahoo.com/yplus/yoffer.html
Eugene Correia
2003-08-11 14:38:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gabe Menezes
A fantastically written article which not only sheds
light on Chris Perry's
and Lorna's story but which also tells us about
Bombay's famous jazz of
years gone by. To boot, it gives a history lesson on
the migration of Goans
to Bombay and their occupations.
Cheers,
Gabe
Naresh's piece is good reading at least for many who
were not aware of the role of Goans in Mumbai's music
world.
But Naresh's saying that people said Chris left his
wife and family for Lorna isn't true. That Chris
wouldn't abandon his wife and family was one of the
issues in Chris and Lorna's relationship.
Chris was domineering, to say the least. He
"controlled" Lorna and, according to some, he made a
contract with Lorna that will never sing for anyone
except him.
Even after their break-up he tried his best to prevent
her from singing for bands and in films. He and his
brothers and friends would create trouble for bands
who engaged Lorna to sign for weddings and parties.
Chris was a "dada" in the Goan music world. He and his
brother Paul were "toughies" and none dared to mess
with them.
I often saw Chris and Lorna arguing near Lorna's home
late at nights. I would nod a hello and proceed or
sometimes ignore them. They, along with other
Dhobitalao musicians, eat at a roadside stall.
They would come walking across Cross Maidan where a
new restaurant had opened (forget name), long after
their Venice days.
At my meetings with Orlando and others, we often
discussed Goan musicians. Many of those names Naresh
has mentioned came up.
I knew some of them or saw some of them in action. I
had once a long talk with Frank Fernand on the
contribution of Goans to Hindi film music. Maybe,
Naresh's third part will have more names such as
Sebastian Fernandes, whose son lives in Toronto. He
was one of the greatest "arranger" in Hindi film
industry.
Need to hear of another jazz great, Braz Gonsalves.
Still a big name in the jazz world. Made an
unsuccessful stint in Toronto where he migrated. He
returned back. I believe Braz's wife, Yvonne, a singer
in her own right, is one of Chic Chocolate's daughter
(nee verification).
Braz's daughter is an accomplished singer. She didn't
migrate as her boyfriend and she were in a band
playign at the Taj.
We had long talks during his brief stay in Toronto,
and earlier when he and Chris came for the First Int'l
Goan Convention in 1988. Both together were great, and
the recording of their show on casette is a treasure.
I am not sure if copies are still available.
After my dad retired from Indian Navy (civilian), he
played in the Hindi film music. During his Navy days
he played occasionally for the Bombay Orchestra, and
often at the Grand Hotel (Ballard Estate) for D'Mello
and his quartet, which played chamber music.
He would tell me many stories of fine musicians of his
time and before him. Wish I had made notes of it.
Someone asked how Naresh may have sourced it. One of
his best sources could be Dr. Thereza Albuquerque. Her
book, The Catholics of Bombay, deals with musicians
and many of the names are mentioned there. If anyone
has a chance to read it, please do so.
Besides, Ronnie Monserrate is another source. But
Ronnie was young to know many things and most of the
tales have been passed his father's generation to his
own.
He quoted Anglo-Lusitanian, a fine paper. Another good
source is perhaps Goan World, and copies of it are
lying with the Heras Institute at St. Xavier's in
Mumbai.
Naresh is young (perhaps in his mid30s), and I met him
when he was in New York working for the Wall Street
Journal. When I learnt he was leaving WSJ to go back
to the Times of India as news editor or deputy news
editor, I sent him an email asking why he was leaving
a good job.
His reply that the US doesn't interest him, and he
needs to do journalism where he could be a
contributing force.
Gilbert Lawrence
2003-08-12 00:27:23 UTC
Permalink
Please disregard the prior post. OR the subject need to be changed to
"Vishy Washy's stand on Rape".

Response:
This is the strangest apologetic response I have ever read. Is the
following what you will tell the girl you just raped? Is this what you
will tell her parents and brothers and elders and the law?

Here is another suggestion. Go over the post you made on "Rape" with
your Mother and your father. Perhaps they will enlighten you - better
late than never!!!.

I do not feel like sending you my regards. GL

-----------------------------------------
You guys are turning out Vishwanath into Pepsi and Coca-cola. Things are
blown out of proportion.

Regards
Vishwanath

----------------

Well said Gilbert!

Remember now, these are the people who are the public faces of the Right
Wing Hindutva movement ( just as wicked as the Rt Wing Nuts among
Muslims and alleged Christians ).

I would have excused this vile comment from Mr. Shirwaikar if

1. He made a slip
2. He was being glib or
3. He was not conversant in the English language
Gilbert Lawrence
2003-08-12 01:03:23 UTC
Permalink
Eugene Correia writes:
Naresh's piece is good reading at least for many who were not aware of
the role of Goans in Mumbai's music world.

Comment:
Great and informative piece by Naresh Fernandes. This was a very well
researched article. From the responses, the Bombay Goans were very
nostalgic. And those Goans, who left Goa and Bombay bypassing all this
culture, got a lesson on Goan culture in Bombay.

One of the reasons why Goan culture in Bombay flourished and prospered-
perhaps more than in Goa was because of the market place. In Bombay
there were the financial resources of the listeners and the clientele
who appreciated that music and dance. Most of the clientele for these
Goan Musical Greats were rich Bombaywallas who frequented the night
clubs, other club houses, ritzy eating establishments and Bollywood.

But before the Goans became Greats in Bombay and in Naresh Fernandes'
article, the 'not so rich' Goans supported and nourished the Goan
artists. Here may be a learning lesson for the current Goan Diasporas.
But before we get to that, the breeding ground for young musically
inclined Goan boys to develop and polish their act were the Goan
functions - weddings and dances (through out the year and specially
Christmas and New Year season) hosted by the Catholic Gymkhana, Byculla
Mechanics, the Bandra gymkhana etc.

The foremost to stimulate the spirit of competition and excellence were
the "Teens and Tunes" musical and dance competitions. The article did
not mention about this institution and whether it still exists. Perhaps
some GoaNetters form Bombay may enlighten us on this. In the seventies,
we had the high school and college 4-5 member band groups with names
like: five stars, Caravels, Drifters, Gay Dukes, Gemini four to name a
few, among many others that vied for the annual top three spots in the
young Goan music world. These young boys were basically home grown
without fancy/expensive equipment that struggled and were motivated to
learn and master the art. There were no school or college music
departments as we have in the USA.

In the Goan Diaspora, with all the support system in the schools and in
the home, we have not been able to stimulate many young Goan boys and
girls into music. And those that made it did so on their own without
much Goan community support. The only time the Goan community
appreciated these artists was after the world at large gave them
accolades and recognized their talent. Perhaps Toronto has some Goan
young music groups. But to the best of my knowledge New York City and
Chicago do not have any. How can the community nurture that talent?
Every Indian function I attend has performances by 7-15 year-old boys
and girls on Indian music and dance and that is great.

This is a call to action by the Goan community in the Diaspora!!!
Helga do Rosario Gomes
2003-08-12 02:09:41 UTC
Permalink
Gilbert, perhaps you meant that JAZZ flourished in Bombay more than in Goa
because Goan culture has always flourished in Goa! Our mandos and our
tiatros will never die. Jazz was popular with the well heeled 'Bombaywallas'
probably because they were exposed to music in English whereas in Goa
Konkani and Portuguese music was more appreciated.
The article by Naresh Ferandes was excellent - he have us a glimpse into a
Bombay we had not imagined. I chanced upon another of his articles TOMB
RAIDER -Looking for St. Francis Xavier which can be found at
http://www.transitionmagazine.com/online/tombraider.htm
Its hilarious and I think everyone will enjoy it. There is a verse or a poem
by Eunice de Souza which could have been my old aunt speaking!
---Helga
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
One of the reasons why Goan culture in Bombay flourished and prospered-
perhaps more than in Goa was because of the market place.
Helga do Rosario Gomes
2003-08-12 02:09:41 UTC
Permalink
Gilbert, perhaps you meant that JAZZ flourished in Bombay more than in Goa
because Goan culture has always flourished in Goa! Our mandos and our
tiatros will never die. Jazz was popular with the well heeled 'Bombaywallas'
probably because they were exposed to music in English whereas in Goa
Konkani and Portuguese music was more appreciated.
The article by Naresh Ferandes was excellent - he have us a glimpse into a
Bombay we had not imagined. I chanced upon another of his articles TOMB
RAIDER -Looking for St. Francis Xavier which can be found at
http://www.transitionmagazine.com/online/tombraider.htm
Its hilarious and I think everyone will enjoy it. There is a verse or a poem
by Eunice de Souza which could have been my old aunt speaking!
---Helga
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
One of the reasons why Goan culture in Bombay flourished and prospered-
perhaps more than in Goa was because of the market place.
Helga do Rosario Gomes
2003-08-12 02:09:41 UTC
Permalink
Gilbert, perhaps you meant that JAZZ flourished in Bombay more than in Goa
because Goan culture has always flourished in Goa! Our mandos and our
tiatros will never die. Jazz was popular with the well heeled 'Bombaywallas'
probably because they were exposed to music in English whereas in Goa
Konkani and Portuguese music was more appreciated.
The article by Naresh Ferandes was excellent - he have us a glimpse into a
Bombay we had not imagined. I chanced upon another of his articles TOMB
RAIDER -Looking for St. Francis Xavier which can be found at
http://www.transitionmagazine.com/online/tombraider.htm
Its hilarious and I think everyone will enjoy it. There is a verse or a poem
by Eunice de Souza which could have been my old aunt speaking!
---Helga
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
One of the reasons why Goan culture in Bombay flourished and prospered-
perhaps more than in Goa was because of the market place.
Helga do Rosario Gomes
2003-08-12 02:09:41 UTC
Permalink
Gilbert, perhaps you meant that JAZZ flourished in Bombay more than in Goa
because Goan culture has always flourished in Goa! Our mandos and our
tiatros will never die. Jazz was popular with the well heeled 'Bombaywallas'
probably because they were exposed to music in English whereas in Goa
Konkani and Portuguese music was more appreciated.
The article by Naresh Ferandes was excellent - he have us a glimpse into a
Bombay we had not imagined. I chanced upon another of his articles TOMB
RAIDER -Looking for St. Francis Xavier which can be found at
http://www.transitionmagazine.com/online/tombraider.htm
Its hilarious and I think everyone will enjoy it. There is a verse or a poem
by Eunice de Souza which could have been my old aunt speaking!
---Helga
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
One of the reasons why Goan culture in Bombay flourished and prospered-
perhaps more than in Goa was because of the market place.
Gilbert Lawrence
2003-08-12 03:44:11 UTC
Permalink
Hi Helga,
I thank you for your correction. The point I was making, the artists
cannot live on their art and neither they nor their art can thrive if
there are no paying customers or clientele (when they are alive). Or
else they will be like Van Gough etc. It is for the community to
support them and appreciate their work during their life time as well as
in their formative years.

You will have to admit while there were some "pobre fidalgos" in Goa,
the vast majority of "pre-1961" Goans could not afford the luxury of
art. Furthermore some "empregados" who lived in the "big city" of Panjim
and Margao had electricity and transportation to go to attend cultural
functions. In small village "pre-1961", there was just the church music
and weddings where the same old music and Konkani Cantaram and mandos
were played and sung. The only musician of repute in a village what the
choir master. Or was I living in a different part of Goa than you?

Gilbert.

----------
Gilbert, perhaps you meant that JAZZ flourished in Bombay more than in
Goa
because Goan culture has always flourished in Goa! Our mandos and our
tiatros will never die. Jazz was popular with the well heeled
'Bombaywallas'
probably because they were exposed to music in English whereas in Goa
Konkani and Portuguese music was more appreciated.
The article by Naresh Ferandes was excellent - he have us a glimpse
into a
Bombay we had not imagined. I chanced upon another of his articles TOMB
RAIDER -Looking for St. Francis Xavier which can be found at
http://www.transitionmagazine.com/online/tombraider.htm
Its hilarious and I think everyone will enjoy it. There is a verse or a
poem
by Eunice de Souza which could have been my old aunt speaking!
---Helga
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
One of the reasons why Goan culture in Bombay flourished and
prospered-
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
perhaps more than in Goa was because of the market place.
########################################################################
##
# Send submissions for Goanet to goanet at goanet.org
#
# PLEASE remember to stay on-topic (related to Goa), and avoid top-posts
#
# More details on Goanet at http://joingoanet.shorturl.com/
#
# Please keep your discussion/tone polite, to reflect respect to others
#
########################################################################
##
Thomas Albrecht
2003-08-12 11:21:44 UTC
Permalink
Hello

Is somebody there, who can tell me, if it is possible to go by ship from
mumbai to Goa or back in the upcoming winter season? And is there a link/url
for that?

One more question I would have:

I was invited a few years ago by the son of Dr Monteiro (whom I did knew
too in 1972!) in Candolim to book at his place, when I will came to Goa. But
I lost the adress. As I will be in Goa at Xmas - I would ask, if anybody
knows his internet/e-mail adress

Thank you so much

Thomas Albrecht
Germany
Frederick Noronha (FN)
2003-08-13 01:52:40 UTC
Permalink
Thomas, Unfortunately, this pleasant mode of travel has been discontinued,
after the old steamers that took 22-24 hours were sent for India's
ill-advised "peacekeeping" operations in Sri Lanka.

A hovercraft that was launched on this route sometime in the 'nineties
could not be sustained due to choppy seas, missed trips and the fact that
the costly (made-in-Europe) hovercraft were quite close to the then
plane-fares.

You have an option of bus (Paulo Travel's Volvo takes 10-12 hours, not
sure exactly how long... there are sleeper buses too -- some love them,
others hate them), train (the fast services are a thing of the past at
least for now, since the June 2003 accident), and of course, air.

Having said all this, to someone who needs to hop in and out of Goa fairly
regularly, this small state remains fairly poorly connected traffic-wise,
inspite of its claims of being a touristic centre and India's # 1 state.
We badly need an airport that is open for most of the day at least, bus
services which depart and arrive at major cities at different timings of
the day (not all departing at about the same time, as at now), and more
coordination among departing vehicles. Currently, it's a chaotic mix of
each one doing their own thing. A better system for ticket sales,
centralised and computerised, as done in Bangalore, would also help the
many thousands of visitors who reach Goa each month. Wish the authorities
would be looking into this... FN
Post by Thomas Albrecht
Hello
Is somebody there, who can tell me, if it is possible to go by ship from
mumbai to Goa or back in the upcoming winter season? And is there a link/url
for that?
I was invited a few years ago by the son of Dr Monteiro (whom I did knew
too in 1972!) in Candolim to book at his place, when I will came to Goa. But
I lost the adress. As I will be in Goa at Xmas - I would ask, if anybody
knows his internet/e-mail adress
Thank you so much
Thomas Albrecht
Germany
--
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Frederick Noronha (FN) | http://www.fredericknoronha.net
Freelance Journalist | http://www.bytesforall.org
http://goalinks.pitas.com | http://joingoanet.shorturl.com
http://linuxinindia.pitas.com | http://www.livejournal.com/users/goalinks
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
T: 0091.832.2409490 or 2409783 M: 0 9822 122436
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Eddie Fernandes
2003-08-13 07:15:44 UTC
Permalink
Headline: Indian cruise liners to tap foreign and upmarket desi tourists

Source: Economic Times of India, 3 Aug. 2003 at
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/cms.dll/html/uncomp/articleshow?msid=110306

BANGALORE: The Ministry of Shipping plans to start a domestic "cruise
shipping" service along the west coast on the lines of "Palace on Wheels" to
cater to foreign and upmarket domestic tourists.

"We want to start domestic cruise shipping, something on the pattern of
Palace on Wheels," Union Minister for Shipping Shatrughan Sinha told PTI
here.

According to initial plans, the cruise liners would link the Mumbai Port
Trust, Goa, and Kerala, besides Tuticorn.

Besides the Ministry of Shipping, Ministry of Tourism, various state
governments and private sector enterprises were involved in developing
cruise tourism in the country, which had already attracted attention of
private investors.

A review meeting was held in Bangalore yesterday with the heads of various
ports in West and Eastern coast.

According to Secretary, Shipping D T Joseph, several international cruise
liners were already docking at Indian ports and the potential of the "Golden
Sea Chain" in the east and west coast could be harnessed.

Stating the time spent by international cruise liners in India had increased
over the years, Joseph said, the domestic cruise lines would offer shopping,
handicrafts and entertainment and also link important tourist destinations
with land and air transport with help from private industry.
================================
Eddie Fernandes
2003-08-13 07:15:44 UTC
Permalink
Headline: Indian cruise liners to tap foreign and upmarket desi tourists

Source: Economic Times of India, 3 Aug. 2003 at
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/cms.dll/html/uncomp/articleshow?msid=110306

BANGALORE: The Ministry of Shipping plans to start a domestic "cruise
shipping" service along the west coast on the lines of "Palace on Wheels" to
cater to foreign and upmarket domestic tourists.

"We want to start domestic cruise shipping, something on the pattern of
Palace on Wheels," Union Minister for Shipping Shatrughan Sinha told PTI
here.

According to initial plans, the cruise liners would link the Mumbai Port
Trust, Goa, and Kerala, besides Tuticorn.

Besides the Ministry of Shipping, Ministry of Tourism, various state
governments and private sector enterprises were involved in developing
cruise tourism in the country, which had already attracted attention of
private investors.

A review meeting was held in Bangalore yesterday with the heads of various
ports in West and Eastern coast.

According to Secretary, Shipping D T Joseph, several international cruise
liners were already docking at Indian ports and the potential of the "Golden
Sea Chain" in the east and west coast could be harnessed.

Stating the time spent by international cruise liners in India had increased
over the years, Joseph said, the domestic cruise lines would offer shopping,
handicrafts and entertainment and also link important tourist destinations
with land and air transport with help from private industry.
================================
Eddie Fernandes
2003-08-13 07:15:44 UTC
Permalink
Headline: Indian cruise liners to tap foreign and upmarket desi tourists

Source: Economic Times of India, 3 Aug. 2003 at
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/cms.dll/html/uncomp/articleshow?msid=110306

BANGALORE: The Ministry of Shipping plans to start a domestic "cruise
shipping" service along the west coast on the lines of "Palace on Wheels" to
cater to foreign and upmarket domestic tourists.

"We want to start domestic cruise shipping, something on the pattern of
Palace on Wheels," Union Minister for Shipping Shatrughan Sinha told PTI
here.

According to initial plans, the cruise liners would link the Mumbai Port
Trust, Goa, and Kerala, besides Tuticorn.

Besides the Ministry of Shipping, Ministry of Tourism, various state
governments and private sector enterprises were involved in developing
cruise tourism in the country, which had already attracted attention of
private investors.

A review meeting was held in Bangalore yesterday with the heads of various
ports in West and Eastern coast.

According to Secretary, Shipping D T Joseph, several international cruise
liners were already docking at Indian ports and the potential of the "Golden
Sea Chain" in the east and west coast could be harnessed.

Stating the time spent by international cruise liners in India had increased
over the years, Joseph said, the domestic cruise lines would offer shopping,
handicrafts and entertainment and also link important tourist destinations
with land and air transport with help from private industry.
================================
Eddie Fernandes
2003-08-13 07:15:44 UTC
Permalink
Headline: Indian cruise liners to tap foreign and upmarket desi tourists

Source: Economic Times of India, 3 Aug. 2003 at
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/cms.dll/html/uncomp/articleshow?msid=110306

BANGALORE: The Ministry of Shipping plans to start a domestic "cruise
shipping" service along the west coast on the lines of "Palace on Wheels" to
cater to foreign and upmarket domestic tourists.

"We want to start domestic cruise shipping, something on the pattern of
Palace on Wheels," Union Minister for Shipping Shatrughan Sinha told PTI
here.

According to initial plans, the cruise liners would link the Mumbai Port
Trust, Goa, and Kerala, besides Tuticorn.

Besides the Ministry of Shipping, Ministry of Tourism, various state
governments and private sector enterprises were involved in developing
cruise tourism in the country, which had already attracted attention of
private investors.

A review meeting was held in Bangalore yesterday with the heads of various
ports in West and Eastern coast.

According to Secretary, Shipping D T Joseph, several international cruise
liners were already docking at Indian ports and the potential of the "Golden
Sea Chain" in the east and west coast could be harnessed.

Stating the time spent by international cruise liners in India had increased
over the years, Joseph said, the domestic cruise lines would offer shopping,
handicrafts and entertainment and also link important tourist destinations
with land and air transport with help from private industry.
================================
Frederick Noronha (FN)
2003-08-13 01:52:40 UTC
Permalink
Thomas, Unfortunately, this pleasant mode of travel has been discontinued,
after the old steamers that took 22-24 hours were sent for India's
ill-advised "peacekeeping" operations in Sri Lanka.

A hovercraft that was launched on this route sometime in the 'nineties
could not be sustained due to choppy seas, missed trips and the fact that
the costly (made-in-Europe) hovercraft were quite close to the then
plane-fares.

You have an option of bus (Paulo Travel's Volvo takes 10-12 hours, not
sure exactly how long... there are sleeper buses too -- some love them,
others hate them), train (the fast services are a thing of the past at
least for now, since the June 2003 accident), and of course, air.

Having said all this, to someone who needs to hop in and out of Goa fairly
regularly, this small state remains fairly poorly connected traffic-wise,
inspite of its claims of being a touristic centre and India's # 1 state.
We badly need an airport that is open for most of the day at least, bus
services which depart and arrive at major cities at different timings of
the day (not all departing at about the same time, as at now), and more
coordination among departing vehicles. Currently, it's a chaotic mix of
each one doing their own thing. A better system for ticket sales,
centralised and computerised, as done in Bangalore, would also help the
many thousands of visitors who reach Goa each month. Wish the authorities
would be looking into this... FN
Post by Thomas Albrecht
Hello
Is somebody there, who can tell me, if it is possible to go by ship from
mumbai to Goa or back in the upcoming winter season? And is there a link/url
for that?
I was invited a few years ago by the son of Dr Monteiro (whom I did knew
too in 1972!) in Candolim to book at his place, when I will came to Goa. But
I lost the adress. As I will be in Goa at Xmas - I would ask, if anybody
knows his internet/e-mail adress
Thank you so much
Thomas Albrecht
Germany
--
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Frederick Noronha (FN) | http://www.fredericknoronha.net
Freelance Journalist | http://www.bytesforall.org
http://goalinks.pitas.com | http://joingoanet.shorturl.com
http://linuxinindia.pitas.com | http://www.livejournal.com/users/goalinks
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
T: 0091.832.2409490 or 2409783 M: 0 9822 122436
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Frederick Noronha (FN)
2003-08-13 01:52:40 UTC
Permalink
Thomas, Unfortunately, this pleasant mode of travel has been discontinued,
after the old steamers that took 22-24 hours were sent for India's
ill-advised "peacekeeping" operations in Sri Lanka.

A hovercraft that was launched on this route sometime in the 'nineties
could not be sustained due to choppy seas, missed trips and the fact that
the costly (made-in-Europe) hovercraft were quite close to the then
plane-fares.

You have an option of bus (Paulo Travel's Volvo takes 10-12 hours, not
sure exactly how long... there are sleeper buses too -- some love them,
others hate them), train (the fast services are a thing of the past at
least for now, since the June 2003 accident), and of course, air.

Having said all this, to someone who needs to hop in and out of Goa fairly
regularly, this small state remains fairly poorly connected traffic-wise,
inspite of its claims of being a touristic centre and India's # 1 state.
We badly need an airport that is open for most of the day at least, bus
services which depart and arrive at major cities at different timings of
the day (not all departing at about the same time, as at now), and more
coordination among departing vehicles. Currently, it's a chaotic mix of
each one doing their own thing. A better system for ticket sales,
centralised and computerised, as done in Bangalore, would also help the
many thousands of visitors who reach Goa each month. Wish the authorities
would be looking into this... FN
Post by Thomas Albrecht
Hello
Is somebody there, who can tell me, if it is possible to go by ship from
mumbai to Goa or back in the upcoming winter season? And is there a link/url
for that?
I was invited a few years ago by the son of Dr Monteiro (whom I did knew
too in 1972!) in Candolim to book at his place, when I will came to Goa. But
I lost the adress. As I will be in Goa at Xmas - I would ask, if anybody
knows his internet/e-mail adress
Thank you so much
Thomas Albrecht
Germany
--
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Frederick Noronha (FN) | http://www.fredericknoronha.net
Freelance Journalist | http://www.bytesforall.org
http://goalinks.pitas.com | http://joingoanet.shorturl.com
http://linuxinindia.pitas.com | http://www.livejournal.com/users/goalinks
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
T: 0091.832.2409490 or 2409783 M: 0 9822 122436
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Frederick Noronha (FN)
2003-08-13 01:52:40 UTC
Permalink
Thomas, Unfortunately, this pleasant mode of travel has been discontinued,
after the old steamers that took 22-24 hours were sent for India's
ill-advised "peacekeeping" operations in Sri Lanka.

A hovercraft that was launched on this route sometime in the 'nineties
could not be sustained due to choppy seas, missed trips and the fact that
the costly (made-in-Europe) hovercraft were quite close to the then
plane-fares.

You have an option of bus (Paulo Travel's Volvo takes 10-12 hours, not
sure exactly how long... there are sleeper buses too -- some love them,
others hate them), train (the fast services are a thing of the past at
least for now, since the June 2003 accident), and of course, air.

Having said all this, to someone who needs to hop in and out of Goa fairly
regularly, this small state remains fairly poorly connected traffic-wise,
inspite of its claims of being a touristic centre and India's # 1 state.
We badly need an airport that is open for most of the day at least, bus
services which depart and arrive at major cities at different timings of
the day (not all departing at about the same time, as at now), and more
coordination among departing vehicles. Currently, it's a chaotic mix of
each one doing their own thing. A better system for ticket sales,
centralised and computerised, as done in Bangalore, would also help the
many thousands of visitors who reach Goa each month. Wish the authorities
would be looking into this... FN
Post by Thomas Albrecht
Hello
Is somebody there, who can tell me, if it is possible to go by ship from
mumbai to Goa or back in the upcoming winter season? And is there a link/url
for that?
I was invited a few years ago by the son of Dr Monteiro (whom I did knew
too in 1972!) in Candolim to book at his place, when I will came to Goa. But
I lost the adress. As I will be in Goa at Xmas - I would ask, if anybody
knows his internet/e-mail adress
Thank you so much
Thomas Albrecht
Germany
--
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Frederick Noronha (FN) | http://www.fredericknoronha.net
Freelance Journalist | http://www.bytesforall.org
http://goalinks.pitas.com | http://joingoanet.shorturl.com
http://linuxinindia.pitas.com | http://www.livejournal.com/users/goalinks
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
T: 0091.832.2409490 or 2409783 M: 0 9822 122436
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Miguel
2003-08-12 18:19:27 UTC
Permalink
Jazz in Goa before 1961? Never heard it ...or heard of it. In fact I never
heard /heard of Jazz being played in Goa all through the 1960s and 1970s!
Where did Helga hear all that jazz?


There is an old couplet that goes: "Three cities in which Homer begged
Fought for the honour of Homer dead"
That is not Latin and Greek.It is the reality of art even today.

Miguel
----- Original Message -----
From: "Gilbert Lawrence" <gilbertlaw at adelphia.net>
To: goanet at goanet.org
. The point I was making, the artists
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
cannot live on their art and neither they nor their art can thrive if
there are no paying customers or clientele (when they are alive). Or
else they will be like Van Gough etc. It is for the community to
support them and appreciate their work during their life time as well as
in their formative years.
"pre-1961" Goans could not afford the luxury of
art. there was just the church music
and weddings . The only musician of repute in a village what the
choir master. Or was I living in a different part of Goa than you?
Gilbert.
----------
Gilbert, perhaps you meant that JAZZ flourished in Bombay more than in
Goa . Jazz was popular with the well heeled 'Bombaywallas'
probably because they were exposed to music in English whereas in Goa
Konkani and Portuguese music was more appreciated.Helga
---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.502 / Virus Database: 300 - Release Date: 7/18/2003
Helga do Rosario Gomes
2003-08-13 00:30:41 UTC
Permalink
Au contraire! I said that jazz was probably popular in Bombay as people in
Bombay were more tuned to music in English unlike Goans who appreciated
Portuguese and Konkani music. The only jazz I heard was when my neighbor was
trying to impress us village types with his rendition of Satchmo's 'What a
wonderful world' on his wacky guitar!
--Helga

----- Original Message -----
From: "Miguel" <miguel12 at sancharnet.in>
To: <goanet at goanet.org>
Sent: Tuesday, August 12, 2003 2:19 PM
Subject: Re: [Goanet]Another article by Naresh Fernandes
Post by Miguel
Jazz in Goa before 1961? Never heard it ...or heard of it. In fact I never
heard /heard of Jazz being played in Goa all through the 1960s and 1970s!
Where did Helga hear all that jazz?
That is not Latin and Greek.It is the reality of art even today.
Post by Helga do Rosario Gomes
Gilbert, perhaps you meant that JAZZ flourished in Bombay more than in
Goa . Jazz was popular with the well heeled 'Bombaywallas'
probably because they were exposed to music in English whereas in Goa
Konkani and Portuguese music was more appreciated.Helga
Helga do Rosario Gomes
2003-08-13 00:30:41 UTC
Permalink
Au contraire! I said that jazz was probably popular in Bombay as people in
Bombay were more tuned to music in English unlike Goans who appreciated
Portuguese and Konkani music. The only jazz I heard was when my neighbor was
trying to impress us village types with his rendition of Satchmo's 'What a
wonderful world' on his wacky guitar!
--Helga

----- Original Message -----
From: "Miguel" <miguel12 at sancharnet.in>
To: <goanet at goanet.org>
Sent: Tuesday, August 12, 2003 2:19 PM
Subject: Re: [Goanet]Another article by Naresh Fernandes
Post by Miguel
Jazz in Goa before 1961? Never heard it ...or heard of it. In fact I never
heard /heard of Jazz being played in Goa all through the 1960s and 1970s!
Where did Helga hear all that jazz?
That is not Latin and Greek.It is the reality of art even today.
Post by Helga do Rosario Gomes
Gilbert, perhaps you meant that JAZZ flourished in Bombay more than in
Goa . Jazz was popular with the well heeled 'Bombaywallas'
probably because they were exposed to music in English whereas in Goa
Konkani and Portuguese music was more appreciated.Helga
Helga do Rosario Gomes
2003-08-13 00:30:41 UTC
Permalink
Au contraire! I said that jazz was probably popular in Bombay as people in
Bombay were more tuned to music in English unlike Goans who appreciated
Portuguese and Konkani music. The only jazz I heard was when my neighbor was
trying to impress us village types with his rendition of Satchmo's 'What a
wonderful world' on his wacky guitar!
--Helga

----- Original Message -----
From: "Miguel" <miguel12 at sancharnet.in>
To: <goanet at goanet.org>
Sent: Tuesday, August 12, 2003 2:19 PM
Subject: Re: [Goanet]Another article by Naresh Fernandes
Post by Miguel
Jazz in Goa before 1961? Never heard it ...or heard of it. In fact I never
heard /heard of Jazz being played in Goa all through the 1960s and 1970s!
Where did Helga hear all that jazz?
That is not Latin and Greek.It is the reality of art even today.
Post by Helga do Rosario Gomes
Gilbert, perhaps you meant that JAZZ flourished in Bombay more than in
Goa . Jazz was popular with the well heeled 'Bombaywallas'
probably because they were exposed to music in English whereas in Goa
Konkani and Portuguese music was more appreciated.Helga
Helga do Rosario Gomes
2003-08-13 00:30:41 UTC
Permalink
Au contraire! I said that jazz was probably popular in Bombay as people in
Bombay were more tuned to music in English unlike Goans who appreciated
Portuguese and Konkani music. The only jazz I heard was when my neighbor was
trying to impress us village types with his rendition of Satchmo's 'What a
wonderful world' on his wacky guitar!
--Helga

----- Original Message -----
From: "Miguel" <miguel12 at sancharnet.in>
To: <goanet at goanet.org>
Sent: Tuesday, August 12, 2003 2:19 PM
Subject: Re: [Goanet]Another article by Naresh Fernandes
Post by Miguel
Jazz in Goa before 1961? Never heard it ...or heard of it. In fact I never
heard /heard of Jazz being played in Goa all through the 1960s and 1970s!
Where did Helga hear all that jazz?
That is not Latin and Greek.It is the reality of art even today.
Post by Helga do Rosario Gomes
Gilbert, perhaps you meant that JAZZ flourished in Bombay more than in
Goa . Jazz was popular with the well heeled 'Bombaywallas'
probably because they were exposed to music in English whereas in Goa
Konkani and Portuguese music was more appreciated.Helga
Helga do Rosario Gomes
2003-08-13 02:20:50 UTC
Permalink
Hi Gilbert!
I wasnt correcting you just clarifying!
Yes patronage of the arts or the lack of it is a very old problem - even
older than Van Gogh and artists who have been encouraged by kings and
wealthy men and women should consider themselves lucky for there are many
who have not. In India we have not laid great emphasis on the Arts in the
schools either.But even with all this apathy we still produced Emiliano
Cruz, Remo Fernandes and so many talented tiatristas!
But comparing Goa and Bombay as many people tend to do doesnt really make
sense - Goa was and still is a very small place that charms everyone while
Bombay is a metropolis with money. So its understandable that musicians
gravitated to it then and now - wasn't that what the Big Apple was all
about? I heard that all the great jazz and blues singers said that you
hadn't made it until you had plucked the Big Apple which was New York. I
could be wrong about the origin of term but not about the importance of
making it big in NY.
I cant really comment on what pre- 1961 Goa was like - mine are just stories
woven by my mother and her family for the entertainment of my sister and I.
And I do not know what the 'pobre fidalgos' were doing either - probably
living their lives of 'pobreza' and 'fidalguice'! Well if they were 'pobres'
then that counts them out as patrons of music. As far as I know the 'ricos'
were using their money to built elaborate mansions stuffed with chandeliers
and Macao chinaware. Which reminds me that everyone has got to read Naresh's
other article - its about Macao and its very funny!
--Helga



----- Original Message -----
From: "Gilbert Lawrence" <gilbertlaw at adelphia.net>
To: <goanet at goanet.org>
Sent: Monday, August 11, 2003 11:44 PM
Subject: RE: [Goanet]Another article by Naresh Fernandes
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
Hi Helga,
I thank you for your correction. The point I was making, the artists
cannot live on their art and neither they nor their art can thrive if
there are no paying customers or clientele (when they are alive). Or
else they will be like Van Gough etc. It is for the community to
support them and appreciate their work during their life time as well as
in their formative years.
You will have to admit while there were some "pobre fidalgos" in Goa,
the vast majority of "pre-1961" Goans could not afford the luxury of
art. Furthermore some "empregados" who lived in the "big city" of Panjim
and Margao had electricity and transportation to go to attend cultural
functions. In small village "pre-1961", there was just the church music
and weddings where the same old music and Konkani Cantaram and mandos
were played and sung. The only musician of repute in a village what the
choir master. Or was I living in a different part of Goa than you?
Thomas Albrecht
2003-08-12 11:21:44 UTC
Permalink
Hello

Is somebody there, who can tell me, if it is possible to go by ship from
mumbai to Goa or back in the upcoming winter season? And is there a link/url
for that?

One more question I would have:

I was invited a few years ago by the son of Dr Monteiro (whom I did knew
too in 1972!) in Candolim to book at his place, when I will came to Goa. But
I lost the adress. As I will be in Goa at Xmas - I would ask, if anybody
knows his internet/e-mail adress

Thank you so much

Thomas Albrecht
Germany
Miguel
2003-08-12 18:19:27 UTC
Permalink
Jazz in Goa before 1961? Never heard it ...or heard of it. In fact I never
heard /heard of Jazz being played in Goa all through the 1960s and 1970s!
Where did Helga hear all that jazz?


There is an old couplet that goes: "Three cities in which Homer begged
Fought for the honour of Homer dead"
That is not Latin and Greek.It is the reality of art even today.

Miguel
----- Original Message -----
From: "Gilbert Lawrence" <gilbertlaw at adelphia.net>
To: goanet at goanet.org
. The point I was making, the artists
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
cannot live on their art and neither they nor their art can thrive if
there are no paying customers or clientele (when they are alive). Or
else they will be like Van Gough etc. It is for the community to
support them and appreciate their work during their life time as well as
in their formative years.
"pre-1961" Goans could not afford the luxury of
art. there was just the church music
and weddings . The only musician of repute in a village what the
choir master. Or was I living in a different part of Goa than you?
Gilbert.
----------
Gilbert, perhaps you meant that JAZZ flourished in Bombay more than in
Goa . Jazz was popular with the well heeled 'Bombaywallas'
probably because they were exposed to music in English whereas in Goa
Konkani and Portuguese music was more appreciated.Helga
---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.502 / Virus Database: 300 - Release Date: 7/18/2003
Helga do Rosario Gomes
2003-08-13 02:20:50 UTC
Permalink
Hi Gilbert!
I wasnt correcting you just clarifying!
Yes patronage of the arts or the lack of it is a very old problem - even
older than Van Gogh and artists who have been encouraged by kings and
wealthy men and women should consider themselves lucky for there are many
who have not. In India we have not laid great emphasis on the Arts in the
schools either.But even with all this apathy we still produced Emiliano
Cruz, Remo Fernandes and so many talented tiatristas!
But comparing Goa and Bombay as many people tend to do doesnt really make
sense - Goa was and still is a very small place that charms everyone while
Bombay is a metropolis with money. So its understandable that musicians
gravitated to it then and now - wasn't that what the Big Apple was all
about? I heard that all the great jazz and blues singers said that you
hadn't made it until you had plucked the Big Apple which was New York. I
could be wrong about the origin of term but not about the importance of
making it big in NY.
I cant really comment on what pre- 1961 Goa was like - mine are just stories
woven by my mother and her family for the entertainment of my sister and I.
And I do not know what the 'pobre fidalgos' were doing either - probably
living their lives of 'pobreza' and 'fidalguice'! Well if they were 'pobres'
then that counts them out as patrons of music. As far as I know the 'ricos'
were using their money to built elaborate mansions stuffed with chandeliers
and Macao chinaware. Which reminds me that everyone has got to read Naresh's
other article - its about Macao and its very funny!
--Helga



----- Original Message -----
From: "Gilbert Lawrence" <gilbertlaw at adelphia.net>
To: <goanet at goanet.org>
Sent: Monday, August 11, 2003 11:44 PM
Subject: RE: [Goanet]Another article by Naresh Fernandes
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
Hi Helga,
I thank you for your correction. The point I was making, the artists
cannot live on their art and neither they nor their art can thrive if
there are no paying customers or clientele (when they are alive). Or
else they will be like Van Gough etc. It is for the community to
support them and appreciate their work during their life time as well as
in their formative years.
You will have to admit while there were some "pobre fidalgos" in Goa,
the vast majority of "pre-1961" Goans could not afford the luxury of
art. Furthermore some "empregados" who lived in the "big city" of Panjim
and Margao had electricity and transportation to go to attend cultural
functions. In small village "pre-1961", there was just the church music
and weddings where the same old music and Konkani Cantaram and mandos
were played and sung. The only musician of repute in a village what the
choir master. Or was I living in a different part of Goa than you?
Thomas Albrecht
2003-08-12 11:21:44 UTC
Permalink
Hello

Is somebody there, who can tell me, if it is possible to go by ship from
mumbai to Goa or back in the upcoming winter season? And is there a link/url
for that?

One more question I would have:

I was invited a few years ago by the son of Dr Monteiro (whom I did knew
too in 1972!) in Candolim to book at his place, when I will came to Goa. But
I lost the adress. As I will be in Goa at Xmas - I would ask, if anybody
knows his internet/e-mail adress

Thank you so much

Thomas Albrecht
Germany
Miguel
2003-08-12 18:19:27 UTC
Permalink
Jazz in Goa before 1961? Never heard it ...or heard of it. In fact I never
heard /heard of Jazz being played in Goa all through the 1960s and 1970s!
Where did Helga hear all that jazz?


There is an old couplet that goes: "Three cities in which Homer begged
Fought for the honour of Homer dead"
That is not Latin and Greek.It is the reality of art even today.

Miguel
----- Original Message -----
From: "Gilbert Lawrence" <gilbertlaw at adelphia.net>
To: goanet at goanet.org
. The point I was making, the artists
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
cannot live on their art and neither they nor their art can thrive if
there are no paying customers or clientele (when they are alive). Or
else they will be like Van Gough etc. It is for the community to
support them and appreciate their work during their life time as well as
in their formative years.
"pre-1961" Goans could not afford the luxury of
art. there was just the church music
and weddings . The only musician of repute in a village what the
choir master. Or was I living in a different part of Goa than you?
Gilbert.
----------
Gilbert, perhaps you meant that JAZZ flourished in Bombay more than in
Goa . Jazz was popular with the well heeled 'Bombaywallas'
probably because they were exposed to music in English whereas in Goa
Konkani and Portuguese music was more appreciated.Helga
---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.502 / Virus Database: 300 - Release Date: 7/18/2003
Helga do Rosario Gomes
2003-08-13 02:20:50 UTC
Permalink
Hi Gilbert!
I wasnt correcting you just clarifying!
Yes patronage of the arts or the lack of it is a very old problem - even
older than Van Gogh and artists who have been encouraged by kings and
wealthy men and women should consider themselves lucky for there are many
who have not. In India we have not laid great emphasis on the Arts in the
schools either.But even with all this apathy we still produced Emiliano
Cruz, Remo Fernandes and so many talented tiatristas!
But comparing Goa and Bombay as many people tend to do doesnt really make
sense - Goa was and still is a very small place that charms everyone while
Bombay is a metropolis with money. So its understandable that musicians
gravitated to it then and now - wasn't that what the Big Apple was all
about? I heard that all the great jazz and blues singers said that you
hadn't made it until you had plucked the Big Apple which was New York. I
could be wrong about the origin of term but not about the importance of
making it big in NY.
I cant really comment on what pre- 1961 Goa was like - mine are just stories
woven by my mother and her family for the entertainment of my sister and I.
And I do not know what the 'pobre fidalgos' were doing either - probably
living their lives of 'pobreza' and 'fidalguice'! Well if they were 'pobres'
then that counts them out as patrons of music. As far as I know the 'ricos'
were using their money to built elaborate mansions stuffed with chandeliers
and Macao chinaware. Which reminds me that everyone has got to read Naresh's
other article - its about Macao and its very funny!
--Helga



----- Original Message -----
From: "Gilbert Lawrence" <gilbertlaw at adelphia.net>
To: <goanet at goanet.org>
Sent: Monday, August 11, 2003 11:44 PM
Subject: RE: [Goanet]Another article by Naresh Fernandes
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
Hi Helga,
I thank you for your correction. The point I was making, the artists
cannot live on their art and neither they nor their art can thrive if
there are no paying customers or clientele (when they are alive). Or
else they will be like Van Gough etc. It is for the community to
support them and appreciate their work during their life time as well as
in their formative years.
You will have to admit while there were some "pobre fidalgos" in Goa,
the vast majority of "pre-1961" Goans could not afford the luxury of
art. Furthermore some "empregados" who lived in the "big city" of Panjim
and Margao had electricity and transportation to go to attend cultural
functions. In small village "pre-1961", there was just the church music
and weddings where the same old music and Konkani Cantaram and mandos
were played and sung. The only musician of repute in a village what the
choir master. Or was I living in a different part of Goa than you?
Thomas Albrecht
2003-08-12 11:21:44 UTC
Permalink
Hello

Is somebody there, who can tell me, if it is possible to go by ship from
mumbai to Goa or back in the upcoming winter season? And is there a link/url
for that?

One more question I would have:

I was invited a few years ago by the son of Dr Monteiro (whom I did knew
too in 1972!) in Candolim to book at his place, when I will came to Goa. But
I lost the adress. As I will be in Goa at Xmas - I would ask, if anybody
knows his internet/e-mail adress

Thank you so much

Thomas Albrecht
Germany
Miguel
2003-08-12 18:19:27 UTC
Permalink
Jazz in Goa before 1961? Never heard it ...or heard of it. In fact I never
heard /heard of Jazz being played in Goa all through the 1960s and 1970s!
Where did Helga hear all that jazz?


There is an old couplet that goes: "Three cities in which Homer begged
Fought for the honour of Homer dead"
That is not Latin and Greek.It is the reality of art even today.

Miguel
----- Original Message -----
From: "Gilbert Lawrence" <gilbertlaw at adelphia.net>
To: goanet at goanet.org
. The point I was making, the artists
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
cannot live on their art and neither they nor their art can thrive if
there are no paying customers or clientele (when they are alive). Or
else they will be like Van Gough etc. It is for the community to
support them and appreciate their work during their life time as well as
in their formative years.
"pre-1961" Goans could not afford the luxury of
art. there was just the church music
and weddings . The only musician of repute in a village what the
choir master. Or was I living in a different part of Goa than you?
Gilbert.
----------
Gilbert, perhaps you meant that JAZZ flourished in Bombay more than in
Goa . Jazz was popular with the well heeled 'Bombaywallas'
probably because they were exposed to music in English whereas in Goa
Konkani and Portuguese music was more appreciated.Helga
---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.502 / Virus Database: 300 - Release Date: 7/18/2003
Helga do Rosario Gomes
2003-08-13 02:20:50 UTC
Permalink
Hi Gilbert!
I wasnt correcting you just clarifying!
Yes patronage of the arts or the lack of it is a very old problem - even
older than Van Gogh and artists who have been encouraged by kings and
wealthy men and women should consider themselves lucky for there are many
who have not. In India we have not laid great emphasis on the Arts in the
schools either.But even with all this apathy we still produced Emiliano
Cruz, Remo Fernandes and so many talented tiatristas!
But comparing Goa and Bombay as many people tend to do doesnt really make
sense - Goa was and still is a very small place that charms everyone while
Bombay is a metropolis with money. So its understandable that musicians
gravitated to it then and now - wasn't that what the Big Apple was all
about? I heard that all the great jazz and blues singers said that you
hadn't made it until you had plucked the Big Apple which was New York. I
could be wrong about the origin of term but not about the importance of
making it big in NY.
I cant really comment on what pre- 1961 Goa was like - mine are just stories
woven by my mother and her family for the entertainment of my sister and I.
And I do not know what the 'pobre fidalgos' were doing either - probably
living their lives of 'pobreza' and 'fidalguice'! Well if they were 'pobres'
then that counts them out as patrons of music. As far as I know the 'ricos'
were using their money to built elaborate mansions stuffed with chandeliers
and Macao chinaware. Which reminds me that everyone has got to read Naresh's
other article - its about Macao and its very funny!
--Helga



----- Original Message -----
From: "Gilbert Lawrence" <gilbertlaw at adelphia.net>
To: <goanet at goanet.org>
Sent: Monday, August 11, 2003 11:44 PM
Subject: RE: [Goanet]Another article by Naresh Fernandes
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
Hi Helga,
I thank you for your correction. The point I was making, the artists
cannot live on their art and neither they nor their art can thrive if
there are no paying customers or clientele (when they are alive). Or
else they will be like Van Gough etc. It is for the community to
support them and appreciate their work during their life time as well as
in their formative years.
You will have to admit while there were some "pobre fidalgos" in Goa,
the vast majority of "pre-1961" Goans could not afford the luxury of
art. Furthermore some "empregados" who lived in the "big city" of Panjim
and Margao had electricity and transportation to go to attend cultural
functions. In small village "pre-1961", there was just the church music
and weddings where the same old music and Konkani Cantaram and mandos
were played and sung. The only musician of repute in a village what the
choir master. Or was I living in a different part of Goa than you?
Thomas Albrecht
2003-08-12 11:21:44 UTC
Permalink
Hello

Is somebody there, who can tell me, if it is possible to go by ship from
mumbai to Goa or back in the upcoming winter season? And is there a link/url
for that?

One more question I would have:

I was invited a few years ago by the son of Dr Monteiro (whom I did knew
too in 1972!) in Candolim to book at his place, when I will came to Goa. But
I lost the adress. As I will be in Goa at Xmas - I would ask, if anybody
knows his internet/e-mail adress

Thank you so much

Thomas Albrecht
Germany




##########################################################################
# Send submissions for Goanet to goanet at goanet.org #

# PLEASE remember to stay on-topic (related to Goa), and avoid top-posts #
# More details on Goanet at http://joingoanet.shorturl.com/ #
# Please keep your discussion/tone polite, to reflect respect to others #
##########################################################################
Eugene Correia
2003-08-13 02:20:18 UTC
Permalink
The classic jazz may not have been heard in Goa before
1961. Pieces such as Helga mentioned -- Satchmo's What
a Wonderful World -- was played by the 'swing bands'.
Jazz didn't bloom in Bombay till the late 60s. Prior
to the 60s, there was a mixture of jazz and "big band"
music. Chris Perry was influenced by Miles Davis and
he named one of his sons after the jazz legend. Chris
also tried to imitate the sounds of Louis Armstrong,
especially Hello Dolly.
But classic jazz, of the New Orleans type, was
confined to places like Venic and Gaylord.
I covered the first Jazz Yatra in 1978 at the Rang
Bhavan. It was a great experience listening to Sonny
Rollins.
I also enjoyed Japan's Sadao Watanabe Quintet, who
played some swing.
The Indian group included Louis Banks and Braz
Gonsalves. Rudy Cotton was also there.
Niranjan Jhaveri organized the Jazz Yatra, and I
believe he still does it.

Eugene Correia

__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software
http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com
Gilbert Lawrence
2003-08-13 04:15:19 UTC
Permalink
Hi Helga,

Thanks for your polite response and for clarifying the culture /music
scene in Goa. You are right that we wrongly compare and get defensive.
We need to compare and look for any learning lessons / opportunities to
improve.

In my post I was not talking about jazz in Goa and not even Jazz in
Bombay. I am an authority on neither. My taste (and I know little about
it) is just good-old dance music.

I was not talking about the music /art greats in Bombay, Goa or NY. I
was talking about how to get there (to the top). And what can the Goan
community do to help our youth to get there and in the process enrich
Goan culture for the masses. Does Goa (and Bombay) currently have any
music (solo and band) and singing competitions (like 'Teens and Tunes')
in the various villages and talukas - - Not at the state level for the
'Greats'?

Regards, Gilbert.

----------------------------------------------------------------
Hi Gilbert!
I wasnt correcting you just clarifying!
Yes patronage of the arts or the lack of it is a very old problem - even
older than Van Gogh and artists who have been encouraged by kings and
wealthy men and women should consider themselves lucky for there are
many
who have not. In India we have not laid great emphasis on the Arts in
the
schools either.But even with all this apathy we still produced Emiliano
Cruz, Remo Fernandes and so many talented tiatristas!
But comparing Goa and Bombay as many people tend to do doesnt really
make
sense - Goa was and still is a very small place that charms everyone
while
Bombay is a metropolis with money. So its understandable that musicians
gravitated to it then and now - wasn't that what the Big Apple was all
about? I heard that all the great jazz and blues singers said that you
hadn't made it until you had plucked the Big Apple which was New York. I
could be wrong about the origin of term but not about the importance of
making it big in NY.
I cant really comment on what pre- 1961 Goa was like - mine are just
stories
woven by my mother and her family for the entertainment of my sister
and I.
And I do not know what the 'pobre fidalgos' were doing either -
probably
living their lives of 'pobreza' and 'fidalguice'! Well if they were
'pobres'
then that counts them out as patrons of music. As far as I know the
'ricos'
were using their money to built elaborate mansions stuffed with
chandeliers
and Macao chinaware. Which reminds me that everyone has got to read
Naresh's
other article - its about Macao and its very funny!
--Helga



----- Original Message -----
From: "Gilbert Lawrence" <gilbertlaw at adelphia.net>
To: <goanet at goanet.org>
Sent: Monday, August 11, 2003 11:44 PM
Subject: RE: [Goanet]Another article by Naresh Fernandes
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
Hi Helga,
I thank you for your correction. The point I was making, the artists
cannot live on their art and neither they nor their art can thrive if
there are no paying customers or clientele (when they are alive). Or
else they will be like Van Gough etc. It is for the community to
support them and appreciate their work during their life time as well
as
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
in their formative years.
You will have to admit while there were some "pobre fidalgos" in Goa,
the vast majority of "pre-1961" Goans could not afford the luxury of
art. Furthermore some "empregados" who lived in the "big city" of
Panjim
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
and Margao had electricity and transportation to go to attend cultural
functions. In small village "pre-1961", there was just the church
music
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
and weddings where the same old music and Konkani Cantaram and mandos
were played and sung. The only musician of repute in a village what
the
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
choir master. Or was I living in a different part of Goa than you?
########################################################################
##
# Send submissions for Goanet to goanet at goanet.org
#
# PLEASE remember to stay on-topic (related to Goa), and avoid top-posts
#
# More details on Goanet at http://joingoanet.shorturl.com/
#
# Please keep your discussion/tone polite, to reflect respect to others
#
########################################################################
##
gilbert
2003-08-13 04:26:50 UTC
Permalink
--- In Goanet2003 at yahoogroups.com, "Frederick Noronha (FN)"
Post by Frederick Noronha (FN)
A hovercraft that was launched on this route sometime in the
'nineties
Post by Frederick Noronha (FN)
could not be sustained due to choppy seas, missed trips and the
fact that
Post by Frederick Noronha (FN)
the costly (made-in-Europe) hovercraft were quite close to the then
plane-fares.
-------------------------------------------------------
Fred,
it wasnt a hovercraft, which rides on a cushion of air, with no
underwater drag, but a catamaran, whose underwater dynamic shape
produces lift and reduces drag, thus increasing its speed, unlike a
conventional hull. An hovercraft can beach on hard land, while a
catamaran requires a jetty for passengers to disembark.
regards, Gilbert.
Frederick Noronha (FN)
2003-08-14 19:04:25 UTC
Permalink
I stand corrected. Gilbert is right. FN
Post by gilbert
--- In Goanet2003 at yahoogroups.com, "Frederick Noronha (FN)"
Post by Frederick Noronha (FN)
A hovercraft that was launched on this route sometime in the
'nineties
Post by Frederick Noronha (FN)
could not be sustained due to choppy seas, missed trips and the
fact that
Post by Frederick Noronha (FN)
the costly (made-in-Europe) hovercraft were quite close to the then
plane-fares.
-------------------------------------------------------
Fred,
it wasnt a hovercraft, which rides on a cushion of air, with no
underwater drag, but a catamaran, whose underwater dynamic shape
produces lift and reduces drag, thus increasing its speed, unlike a
conventional hull. An hovercraft can beach on hard land, while a
catamaran requires a jetty for passengers to disembark.
regards, Gilbert.
Frederick Noronha (FN)
2003-08-14 19:04:25 UTC
Permalink
I stand corrected. Gilbert is right. FN
Post by gilbert
--- In Goanet2003 at yahoogroups.com, "Frederick Noronha (FN)"
Post by Frederick Noronha (FN)
A hovercraft that was launched on this route sometime in the
'nineties
Post by Frederick Noronha (FN)
could not be sustained due to choppy seas, missed trips and the
fact that
Post by Frederick Noronha (FN)
the costly (made-in-Europe) hovercraft were quite close to the then
plane-fares.
-------------------------------------------------------
Fred,
it wasnt a hovercraft, which rides on a cushion of air, with no
underwater drag, but a catamaran, whose underwater dynamic shape
produces lift and reduces drag, thus increasing its speed, unlike a
conventional hull. An hovercraft can beach on hard land, while a
catamaran requires a jetty for passengers to disembark.
regards, Gilbert.
Frederick Noronha (FN)
2003-08-14 19:04:25 UTC
Permalink
I stand corrected. Gilbert is right. FN
Post by gilbert
--- In Goanet2003 at yahoogroups.com, "Frederick Noronha (FN)"
Post by Frederick Noronha (FN)
A hovercraft that was launched on this route sometime in the
'nineties
Post by Frederick Noronha (FN)
could not be sustained due to choppy seas, missed trips and the
fact that
Post by Frederick Noronha (FN)
the costly (made-in-Europe) hovercraft were quite close to the then
plane-fares.
-------------------------------------------------------
Fred,
it wasnt a hovercraft, which rides on a cushion of air, with no
underwater drag, but a catamaran, whose underwater dynamic shape
produces lift and reduces drag, thus increasing its speed, unlike a
conventional hull. An hovercraft can beach on hard land, while a
catamaran requires a jetty for passengers to disembark.
regards, Gilbert.
Frederick Noronha (FN)
2003-08-14 19:04:25 UTC
Permalink
I stand corrected. Gilbert is right. FN
Post by gilbert
--- In Goanet2003 at yahoogroups.com, "Frederick Noronha (FN)"
Post by Frederick Noronha (FN)
A hovercraft that was launched on this route sometime in the
'nineties
Post by Frederick Noronha (FN)
could not be sustained due to choppy seas, missed trips and the
fact that
Post by Frederick Noronha (FN)
the costly (made-in-Europe) hovercraft were quite close to the then
plane-fares.
-------------------------------------------------------
Fred,
it wasnt a hovercraft, which rides on a cushion of air, with no
underwater drag, but a catamaran, whose underwater dynamic shape
produces lift and reduces drag, thus increasing its speed, unlike a
conventional hull. An hovercraft can beach on hard land, while a
catamaran requires a jetty for passengers to disembark.
regards, Gilbert.
James Almeida
2003-08-13 11:14:37 UTC
Permalink
From: "Eddie Fernandes" <eddie at fernandes.u-net.com>
Reply-To: goanet at goanet.org
To: <goanet at goanet.org>
Subject: Re: [Goanet]Ship from mumbai to goa?
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2003 08:15:44 +0100
Headline: Indian cruise liners to tap foreign and upmarket desi tourists
Source: Economic Times of India, 3 Aug. 2003 at
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/cms.dll/html/uncomp/articleshow?msid=110306
BANGALORE: The Ministry of Shipping plans to start a domestic "cruise
shipping" service along the west coast on the lines of "Palace on Wheels"
to
cater to foreign and upmarket domestic tourists.
"We want to start domestic cruise shipping, something on the pattern of
Palace on Wheels," Union Minister for Shipping Shatrughan Sinha told PTI
here.
I'm just curious whether the government has any competences to enter and
compete in the cruise ship business. I am positive that "Shotgun" Sinha
does not! :-) This would be a utter wastage of the taxpayer monies.
Would it not be better to leave these initiatives to the private sector?

Best,
James

_________________________________________________________________
STOP MORE SPAM with the new MSN 8 and get 2 months FREE*
http://join.msn.com/?page=features/junkmail
gilbert
2003-08-13 14:45:09 UTC
Permalink
--- In Goanet2003 at yahoogroups.com, "James Almeida" <goanet at g...>
Post by James Almeida
I'm just curious whether the government has any competences to
enter and
Post by James Almeida
compete in the cruise ship business. I am positive that "Shotgun"
Sinha
Post by James Almeida
does not! :-) This would be a utter wastage of the taxpayer
monies.
Post by James Almeida
Would it not be better to leave these initiatives to the private
sector?
Post by James Almeida
Best,
James
------------------------------------------------
You're dead right about the lack of competence because it has been
proven for the nth time that whatever the govt. runs in the travel
and hospitality industry is loss making. In the case of palace on
wheels, the losses are huge because the pricing is too steep, and the
biggest users are govt. bureaucrats taking a free ride with their
families. Even take the case of Goa where the govt. runs hotels in
margao, panjim, mapuca, colva and calangute-all loss making, and
still the govt. has only recently sunk a huge amount of money in
renovating them.Why, you may ask? Simple- rooms are subsidised for
Govt employees, and politicians! The corruption which continues is
mind boggling. The socialist lessons of the soviet union are
difficult to give up, believe me.
regards, Gilbert.
Cecil Pinto
2003-08-09 09:44:31 UTC
Permalink
Love and longing in Mumbai?s Jazz Age (Part 1 of 3 Parts)
by Naresh Fernandes - MansWorld magazine July 2003



For over five decades, well into the late 1960s before prohibition,
taxation and rock-and-roll killed it, Mumbai boasted of one of the most
vibrant jazz scenes in the world, outside of the US. On Churchgate Street,
stretching from the Marine Drive sea front all the way up to Flora
Fountain the sound of jazz spilled out through the doors of packed night
clubs like Ambassador, Napoli, The Talk of the Town, Gaylord?s, Ritz,
Little Hut, Bistro and Volga. Not to speak of the Rendezvous at the Taj.
The legendary pianist and composer Dave Brubeck was impressed enough by the
local musicians to attempt to make some recordings during one of his
visits. Set against this backdrop is the tragic love affair of tenor
saxophonist and band leader Chris Perry and singer Lorna Cordeiro. Naresh
Fernandes tells their story for the first time.


---------


Their eyes give it away. Chris Perry wears a slick black jacket, the
sleeves of his crisp white shirt revealing the glint of dark cuff links.
His fingers clasp a gleaming tenor saxophone with a lover?s
gentleness. Arms crossed coquettishly above her waist, Lorna Cordeiro is
chic in a bouffant and a form-fitting gown that shows a flash of ankle.
They stare into each other?s eyes, mesmerised. Behind them looms a giant
camera aperture borrowed from the opening sequence of the Bond films.

You couldn?t miss the poster as you sauntered down Jamshetji Tata Road in
downtown Bombay. It hung outside the Astoria Hotel, across the street from
the octagonal Art Deco turret of Eros cinema, inviting the city to Chris
and Lorna?s daily shows at the Venice nightclub. It was 1971. India was
savouring its newfound place on the world?s stage. The country?s armed
forces had decisively liberated Bangladesh and the idealism of Independence
had welled up again. India?s middle classes were capturing their polyester
memories on Agfa Click IIIs that cost 46.50 rupees (taxes extra), aspiring
to the lifestyles of ?The Jet Set Air Hostesses? described in The
Illustrated Weekly of India (price: 85 paise), and being encouraged by
newspaper ads to ?Go gay with Gaylord fine filter cigarettes?.

As the City of Gold bubbled through its jazz age, Lorna and Chris
enthralled Bombay with their shows at Venice each night. Remo Fernandes,
who would go on to become the first Indian pop musician to record an album
of original English-language tunes, was among those locked in the spell.
?Two artists sometimes ignite a creative chemistry in each other which goes
beyond all logical explanation. Mere mortals can only look and listen in
awe,? he rhapsodised. ?In such duos, one plus one does not make two. It
makes a number so immeasurable, it defies all laws of calculus.?

But the sparks that flew at Venice gradually built into a roaring
conflagration. As Remo put it: ?Hyper-intense, high-temperament artistic
relationships often end in emotional disaster, like two comets when they
steer too dangerously close. Chris?s and Lorna?s, as we all know, was no
exception.?

Like the myths about the city in which they soared to fame, the tale of
Chris and Lorna has gained so much in the re-telling it?s sometimes
difficult to thresh the apocrypha from the actual. Thirty years after the
two stopped performing together, old-time musicians in the bylanes of Dhobi
Talao and Bandra still beg anonymity as they reminisce in sad whispers.

?He was shameless. He left his wife and three small children for that girl.?

?Chris and Lorna were in love. When they fought, they became mortal
enemies. He destroyed her and he destroyed himself.?

?She was very good singer. Beyond that, she was nothing. She got her break
with Chris Perry. He made contract with her. She couldn?t sing without his
permission. She had no brains, so she signed. Then he went back to his wife.?

?He didn?t let her perform with anyone else. He threatened to break the
legs of one Hindu fellow who tried to get her to sing with him.?

?She hit the bottle, men. She became an alcoholic and just disappeared.?

Chris Perry who was born Pereira died on January 25, 2002, his last years
hobbled by Parkinson?s disease. Lorna has refused to recount her version of
events for publication. But the fidelity of her contralto booming out of
our speakers, embroidered with Chris?s perfectly crafted sax filigrees,
speaks its own truth.


Ronnie Monserrate was 19 when he began to play Sunday gigs at Venice with
the Chris Perry band, sitting in for the regular pianist. Venice had a
reputation. It was the jazzman?s jazz haunt, the rendezvous for musicians
from around the country and occasionally from around the world. Dave
Brubeck swung by when he visited Bombay in 1958, as Duke Ellington had when
his band set out on their famous world tour of 1963. As Ronnie tells it,
the dapper Chris Perry was the musician?s musician: ?He had perfect pitch.
He was an arranger, a composer, a player.? Chris played both trumpet and
saxophone, sometimes switching from one to the other mid-tune, a feat that
required elaborate lip control. His trumpet tone was broad and true. He
didn?t have flashy technique, but the notes he coaxed out of his horn had a
mellowness that kept the fans coming back night after night.

Chris was 43 at the time, Lorna was 25. No one seems quite sure exactly how
they met, but everyone?s agreed that he groomed her into one of the
Bombay?s finest crooners. One version maintains that Lorna got her break
when still in school, after she won the Connie Francis soundalike
competition at Metro cinema. This prompted a musician named Raymond
Albuqerque to invite her to sing in his show at the Bandra Fair. Her
rendition of Underneath the Mango Tree got the crowds so fired up that
Chris Perry, already an established performer, went to her home to audition
her. She was just 16 when she joined Perry?s band.

A vocalist in the Shirley Bassey mould, Lorna belted out every tune like it
was her last time on stage. ?She had a lot of black feel,? is how Ronnie
describes her performances. ?You could see the intensity when she was on
stage. She?d give it her best, every time. She was like a magnet. You
couldn?t help but be attracted to her when she was on stage. And with Chris
Perry band by her side, it was like magic happening. There was incredible
attraction. There was a lot of love in the interaction. It was apparent in
their body language. They brought out the best in each other. They?d look
into each other?s eyes and their understanding was so great that there?d be
spontaneous combustion.?

Offstage, though, things could get awkward. Any man attempting to talk to
Lorna was liable to get a taste of Perry?s famously volatile fists. During
breaks, the musicians would sit around their table, absolutely silent.
?They were jolly people but they were afraid to laugh around Chris,? Ronnie
says. Ronnie was the only exception, perhaps because his youth made him
seem unthreatening. Two decades later, he?d find opportunity to call in
that bond of trust.

Venice was around the corner from Bombay?s swinging jazz strip, Churchgate
Street (now Veer Nariman Road). Pianists, trios and quartets were to be
heard all the way down the 200-metre thoroughfare as it led off from
Churchgate station to the Arabian Sea. First came Berry?s, with tandoori
butter chicken that was the stuff of Bombay legend and accomplished
piano-fronted groups led by Dorothy Jones and Stanley Pinto. Across the
fence was Bombelli?s, named after its Swiss owner, where a trio held sway
as ad men sipped cappuccinos. Then came the Ambassador, where Toni Pinto?s
quintet encapsulated Bombay?s diversity: the group had two Jews a singer
named Ephrim Elias and drummer Abie Cohen, an Anglo-Indian tenor
saxophonist named Norman Mobsby, and, in addition to Pinto, another Goan,
the bassist Clement Furtado.

Pinto?s kingdom was named the Other Room, so called because after the rich
and famous had finished drinking at the bar, they?d say, ?Let?s go to the
other room.? He ruled for 16 years from 1958, his sharply dressed group
spinning out hard-driving bop and light classics, and playing back-up for
cabarets and visiting acrobats, magicians and flamenco dancers. The
Ambassador was owned by the cigar-chomping Jack Voyantzis, an ebullient
Greek who was assisted by his brother, Socrates. The siblings had started
their subcontinental journey in Rangoon, opened a caf? in Delhi, and
finally found their way to Bombay, where they transformed a hotel known as
the Argentinian into the Ambassador. The cream of Bombay society turned out
to catch Toni?s tightly-rehearsed band. Toni remembers once looking up from
his piano to see three of the city?s leading editors appreciatively tapping
their feet: Rusi Karanjia, editor of the left-wing tabloid Blitz, D F
Karaka, editor of the rival Current, and Frank Moraes, editor of the Indian
Express, with his American girlfriend. Another time, as the band was going
through its routine, Toni realised that someone from the back of the room
was playing along on a trumpet. It turned out to be American hornman Eddie
Calvert. ?He came for dinner one night even though he was staying at the
Ritz,? Toni says, and he asked his drummer, Bobby Hadrian, to go back and
get his instrument. Calvert and Toni?s band jammed for an hour, playing
the tunes the American had made famous: Cherry Pink, Begin the Beguine,
Wonderland by Night.

Elsewhere on Churchgate Street, music spilled out through the doors of the
Napoli, The Talk of the Town and Gaylord?s. Opposite Venice, there was jazz
at the Ritz, while at the Little Hut, Neville Thomas led a group calling
itself Three Guys and a Doll. Past Flora Fountain stood Bistro and Volga,
home to a quartet led by the grandfatherly baritone saxophonist Hecke
Kingdom.

Dave Brubeck was impressed enough by the local musicians to attempt to make
some recordings with them during his visit. But Bombay defeated him. He
later recounted the episode to an interviewer: ?The current fluctuated in
Bombay in those days and so the tape would speed up and slow down. Like,
when you were shaving, the speed of the motor would go up and down. It
ruined one of my favourite tapes I've ever made.? Another visiting jazzman,
the pianist Hampton Hawes, was overwhelmed by problems that were rather
more basic. ?Bombay turned me around,? he wrote. ?I?d never seen poverty
before.? Art, he decided, was irrelevant amidst the gnawing deprivation.
?Here I was thinking about making a big splash, a hit record, going home a
hero, and I?m walking the streets with motherfuckers who don?t even know
what a piece of bread is, let along Stravinsky or Charlie Parker. If Bird
was alive and played for them they wouldn?t be able to hear him because
they?d be too damn hungry.?

Admittedly, jazz had always been the preserve of Bombay?s elite. But while
the audiences were upper crust, the musicians who cooked up the syncopated
rhythms were not. Like Toni Pinto, Ronnie Monserrate, Chris and Lorna, the
majority were Roman Catholics strivers from the former Portuguese colony of
Goa, 550 kilometres south of Bombay. They?d been an important part of the
Bombay music scene since the 1920s, when Bombay began to develop its
appetite for what was then called ?hot music?. Jazz had made its way from
New Orleans in the waxy grooves of phonograph records and travelled over
the oceans with touring American bands that played for the administrators
of the Raj. Bombay?s first jazz concerts were performed at the Bandstand,
south of the Oval. Among the earliest jazzmen to play an extended stint in
Bombay was Leon Abbey, a violinist from Minnesota, who led an eight-piece
band at the Taj during the 1935-?36 season. Abbey wore white tails on stage
and played the freshest sounds. He told one interviewer, ?I kept up with
the latest numbers because someone would always come up to the bandstand
and say, ?Old Bean, would you play so and so
?, because as far as he was
concerned, we should know how to play everything that had ever been
written.? Midway through the trip, the Taj management sent Abbey and
saxophonist Art Lanier back to New York to pick up the latest music.

Abbey?s outfit was replaced by the Symphonians, fronted by the cornet
player Cricket Smith. Smith had been featured on the seminal recordings
made by James Reese Europe?s Society Orchestra in 1913 and 1914, capturing
jazz at the moment of its transition from the relatively unsophisticated
ragtime style. Smith ?signed his contract for a fixed amount of money and
two Coronas a day, so every day, the manager would have to bring him his
cigars?, recalls Luis Moreno, a Spanish trumpet player who lived in Bombay
for 20 years. ?He was a character.?

In 1938, pianist Teddy Weatherford, who had played with Louis Armstrong,
took the stage with his men. His swinging style and treble voicing had been
an important influence on jazz during its formative years. The Taj, it
would seem, wasn?t quite the genteel venue it now is not at least from
the way Weatherford?s occasional Russian bassist named ?Innocent Nick?
described the gigs to the jazz magazine Storyville. ?Teddy used to play
downstairs, in the Tavern of the Taj, for the soldiers, sailors and others,
a very rough place,? Nick said. ?Teddy would play for hours without a
break. Even with drinks, he would continue one-handed. He had tremendous
hands.?

For the African-American musicians, Bombay provided refuge from the
apartheid in the U.S. Men like Weatherford and his sidemen, such as the
saxophonist Roy Butler, spent long years shuttling between Europe and the
subcontinent, where racial barriers seemed non-existent, at least for them.
Butler?s years in India as a Weatherford sideman, he told Storyville, were
among his happiest the work was relatively easy, the pay and conditions
good, he was treated splendidly by both management and clientele, and
enjoyed the luxurious life under the British Raj. The Taj management, on
its part, honoured Weatherford by naming a dish after him: Poires Glace
Weatherford. (The absence of colour prejudice was only to be expected.
After all, industrial baron Jamshetji Tata was moved to build the Taj after
being prevented one leisurely Bombay evening from dining at the
Europeans-only Pyrke?s Apollo Hotel. Later, he famously hung a notice in
the Taj forbidding entry to South Africans and dogs.)

Weatherford?s sidemen were an eclectic lot and opened Bombay?s ears to a
wealth of new sounds, the Cuban drumming of Luis Pedroso and the Spanish
brass of Luis Moreno, among them. Butler, who was known as the Reverend in
acknowledgement of his abstemious ways, helped Weatherford drill the band.
Moreno characterised Butler as the ?gentleman of the orchestra?. Moreno
added, ?He never drank in his life and if someone said, ?How about a round
of drink?? Roy would say, ?I?ll have an ice-cream. You enjoy beer, I enjoy
ice-cream.? Butler went on to lead his own band at Greens, located where
the Taj Intercontinental now stands.

Both Weatherford (who married an Anglo-Indian woman, before dying of
cholera in Calcutta in 1945, aged 41) and Butler recruited Goan sidemen,
plugging Bombay into the source of jazz. The trumpet player Frank Fernand,
who played in Weatherford band with his Goan compatriots, Micky Correa and
Josique Menzies, says that his stint with the American taught him to ?play
like a negro?. Moreno helped Fernand develop the ability to hit long, high
notes, eventually extending his range up to E flat. Butler, it must be
noted, was less than thrilled with his Goan employees. ?My short stretch as
a bandleader in India was not too earth-shaking,? he told Storyville. ?The
local musicians were not too familiar with jazz at that time. I understood
that there are some very good jazzmen out there now, but the time was too
short for anything to develop, good or bad.? For their part, some of the
Goan musicians weren?t overly impressed with Butler, either. They believed
his decision to stay in India was motivated by the fear that he wouldn?t
find work in the US. As Fernand put it, ?The faltu fellows stayed, the good
ones went home.?





----
Continued in Part 2
----





This article in Word format was sent to me, on request, by the Editor of
MansWorld Magazine, N.Radhakrishnan, thus saving me the trouble of typing
it out. Please reciprocate his good gesture by visiting the site
http://www.mansworldindia.com


Cheers!

Cecil


====
Gilbert Lawrence
2003-08-09 16:57:01 UTC
Permalink
Hi all,

Great articles on the Goan culture in Bombay in the 1950-1970 and
beyond.
I do wish Bernard Colaco of ?UK / ?Macau and Constantino Xavier of
Portugal will read these articles and know about Goan culture and the
artists in the Bombay / Mumbai Diaspora. Regards, GL

-----Original Message-----
From: goanet-admin at goanet.org [mailto:goanet-admin at goanet.org] On Behalf
Of Cecil Pinto
Sent: Saturday, August 09, 2003 5:45 AM
To: Goa-Goans at yahoogroups.com; konkaniforum at yahoogroups.com
Cc: aldona-net at yahoogroups.com; goanet at goanet.org
Subject: [aldona-net] [Goanet]Chris & Lorna (Part 1) - by Naresh
Fernandes - MansWorld magazine July 2003

Love and longing in Mumbai?s Jazz Age (Part 1 of 3 Parts)
by Naresh Fernandes - MansWorld magazine July 2003



For over five decades, well into the late 1960s before prohibition,
taxation and rock-and-roll killed it, Mumbai boasted of one of the most
vibrant jazz scenes in the world, outside of the US. On Churchgate
Street,
stretching from the Marine Drive sea front all the way up to Flora
Fountain the sound of jazz spilled out through the doors of packed
night
clubs like Ambassador, Napoli, The Talk of the Town, Gaylord?s, Ritz,
Little Hut, Bistro and Volga. Not to speak of the Rendezvous at the Taj.

The legendary pianist and composer Dave Brubeck was impressed enough by
the
local musicians to attempt to make some recordings during one of his
visits. Set against this backdrop is the tragic love affair of tenor
saxophonist and band leader Chris Perry and singer Lorna Cordeiro.
Naresh
Fernandes tells their story for the first time.


---------


Their eyes give it away. Chris Perry wears a slick black jacket, the
sleeves of his crisp white shirt revealing the glint of dark cuff links.

His fingers clasp a gleaming tenor saxophone with a lover?s
gentleness. Arms crossed coquettishly above her waist, Lorna Cordeiro
is
chic in a bouffant and a form-fitting gown that shows a flash of ankle.
They stare into each other?s eyes, mesmerised. Behind them looms a giant

camera aperture borrowed from the opening sequence of the Bond films.

You couldn?t miss the poster as you sauntered down Jamshetji Tata Road
in
downtown Bombay. It hung outside the Astoria Hotel, across the street
from
the octagonal Art Deco turret of Eros cinema, inviting the city to Chris

and Lorna?s daily shows at the Venice nightclub. It was 1971. India was
savouring its newfound place on the world?s stage. The country?s armed
forces had decisively liberated Bangladesh and the idealism of
Independence
had welled up again. India?s middle classes were capturing their
polyester
memories on Agfa Click IIIs that cost 46.50 rupees (taxes extra),
aspiring
to the lifestyles of ?The Jet Set Air Hostesses? described in The
Illustrated Weekly of India (price: 85 paise), and being encouraged by
newspaper ads to ?Go gay with Gaylord fine filter cigarettes?.

As the City of Gold bubbled through its jazz age, Lorna and Chris
enthralled Bombay with their shows at Venice each night. Remo Fernandes,

who would go on to become the first Indian pop musician to record an
album
of original English-language tunes, was among those locked in the spell.

?Two artists sometimes ignite a creative chemistry in each other which
goes
beyond all logical explanation. Mere mortals can only look and listen in

awe,? he rhapsodised. ?In such duos, one plus one does not make two. It
makes a number so immeasurable, it defies all laws of calculus.?

But the sparks that flew at Venice gradually built into a roaring
conflagration. As Remo put it: ?Hyper-intense, high-temperament artistic

relationships often end in emotional disaster, like two comets when they

steer too dangerously close. Chris?s and Lorna?s, as we all know, was no

exception.?

Like the myths about the city in which they soared to fame, the tale of
Chris and Lorna has gained so much in the re-telling it?s sometimes
difficult to thresh the apocrypha from the actual. Thirty years after
the
two stopped performing together, old-time musicians in the bylanes of
Dhobi
Talao and Bandra still beg anonymity as they reminisce in sad whispers.

?He was shameless. He left his wife and three small children for that
girl.?

?Chris and Lorna were in love. When they fought, they became mortal
enemies. He destroyed her and he destroyed himself.?

?She was very good singer. Beyond that, she was nothing. She got her
break
with Chris Perry. He made contract with her. She couldn?t sing without
his
permission. She had no brains, so she signed. Then he went back to his
wife.?

?He didn?t let her perform with anyone else. He threatened to break the
legs of one Hindu fellow who tried to get her to sing with him.?

?She hit the bottle, men. She became an alcoholic and just disappeared.?

Chris Perry who was born Pereira died on January 25, 2002, his last
years
hobbled by Parkinson?s disease. Lorna has refused to recount her version
of
events for publication. But the fidelity of her contralto booming out of

our speakers, embroidered with Chris?s perfectly crafted sax filigrees,
speaks its own truth.


Ronnie Monserrate was 19 when he began to play Sunday gigs at Venice
with
the Chris Perry band, sitting in for the regular pianist. Venice had a
reputation. It was the jazzman?s jazz haunt, the rendezvous for
musicians
from around the country and occasionally from around the world. Dave
Brubeck swung by when he visited Bombay in 1958, as Duke Ellington had
when
his band set out on their famous world tour of 1963. As Ronnie tells it,

the dapper Chris Perry was the musician?s musician: ?He had perfect
pitch.
He was an arranger, a composer, a player.? Chris played both trumpet and

saxophone, sometimes switching from one to the other mid-tune, a feat
that
required elaborate lip control. His trumpet tone was broad and true. He
didn?t have flashy technique, but the notes he coaxed out of his horn
had a
mellowness that kept the fans coming back night after night.

Chris was 43 at the time, Lorna was 25. No one seems quite sure exactly
how
they met, but everyone?s agreed that he groomed her into one of the
Bombay?s finest crooners. One version maintains that Lorna got her break

when still in school, after she won the Connie Francis soundalike
competition at Metro cinema. This prompted a musician named Raymond
Albuqerque to invite her to sing in his show at the Bandra Fair. Her
rendition of Underneath the Mango Tree got the crowds so fired up that
Chris Perry, already an established performer, went to her home to
audition
her. She was just 16 when she joined Perry?s band.

A vocalist in the Shirley Bassey mould, Lorna belted out every tune like
it
was her last time on stage. ?She had a lot of black feel,? is how Ronnie

describes her performances. ?You could see the intensity when she was
on
stage. She?d give it her best, every time. She was like a magnet. You
couldn?t help but be attracted to her when she was on stage. And with
Chris
Perry band by her side, it was like magic happening. There was
incredible
attraction. There was a lot of love in the interaction. It was apparent
in
their body language. They brought out the best in each other. They?d
look
into each other?s eyes and their understanding was so great that there?d
be
spontaneous combustion.?

Offstage, though, things could get awkward. Any man attempting to talk
to
Lorna was liable to get a taste of Perry?s famously volatile fists.
During
breaks, the musicians would sit around their table, absolutely silent.
?They were jolly people but they were afraid to laugh around Chris,?
Ronnie
says. Ronnie was the only exception, perhaps because his youth made him
seem unthreatening. Two decades later, he?d find opportunity to call in
that bond of trust.

Venice was around the corner from Bombay?s swinging jazz strip,
Churchgate
Street (now Veer Nariman Road). Pianists, trios and quartets were to be
heard all the way down the 200-metre thoroughfare as it led off from
Churchgate station to the Arabian Sea. First came Berry?s, with tandoori

butter chicken that was the stuff of Bombay legend and accomplished
piano-fronted groups led by Dorothy Jones and Stanley Pinto. Across the
fence was Bombelli?s, named after its Swiss owner, where a trio held
sway
as ad men sipped cappuccinos. Then came the Ambassador, where Toni
Pinto?s
quintet encapsulated Bombay?s diversity: the group had two Jews a
singer
named Ephrim Elias and drummer Abie Cohen, an Anglo-Indian tenor
saxophonist named Norman Mobsby, and, in addition to Pinto, another
Goan,
the bassist Clement Furtado.

Pinto?s kingdom was named the Other Room, so called because after the
rich
and famous had finished drinking at the bar, they?d say, ?Let?s go to
the
other room.? He ruled for 16 years from 1958, his sharply dressed group
spinning out hard-driving bop and light classics, and playing back-up
for
cabarets and visiting acrobats, magicians and flamenco dancers. The
Ambassador was owned by the cigar-chomping Jack Voyantzis, an ebullient
Greek who was assisted by his brother, Socrates. The siblings had
started
their subcontinental journey in Rangoon, opened a caf? in Delhi, and
finally found their way to Bombay, where they transformed a hotel known
as
the Argentinian into the Ambassador. The cream of Bombay society turned
out
to catch Toni?s tightly-rehearsed band. Toni remembers once looking up
from
his piano to see three of the city?s leading editors appreciatively
tapping
their feet: Rusi Karanjia, editor of the left-wing tabloid Blitz, D F
Karaka, editor of the rival Current, and Frank Moraes, editor of the
Indian
Express, with his American girlfriend. Another time, as the band was
going
through its routine, Toni realised that someone from the back of the
room
was playing along on a trumpet. It turned out to be American hornman
Eddie
Calvert. ?He came for dinner one night even though he was staying at the

Ritz,? Toni says, and he asked his drummer, Bobby Hadrian, to go back
and
get his instrument. Calvert and Toni?s band jammed for an hour, playing

the tunes the American had made famous: Cherry Pink, Begin the Beguine,
Wonderland by Night.

Elsewhere on Churchgate Street, music spilled out through the doors of
the
Napoli, The Talk of the Town and Gaylord?s. Opposite Venice, there was
jazz
at the Ritz, while at the Little Hut, Neville Thomas led a group calling

itself Three Guys and a Doll. Past Flora Fountain stood Bistro and
Volga,
home to a quartet led by the grandfatherly baritone saxophonist Hecke
Kingdom.

Dave Brubeck was impressed enough by the local musicians to attempt to
make
some recordings with them during his visit. But Bombay defeated him. He
later recounted the episode to an interviewer: ?The current fluctuated
in
Bombay in those days and so the tape would speed up and slow down. Like,

when you were shaving, the speed of the motor would go up and down. It
ruined one of my favourite tapes I've ever made.? Another visiting
jazzman,
the pianist Hampton Hawes, was overwhelmed by problems that were rather
more basic. ?Bombay turned me around,? he wrote. ?I?d never seen poverty

before.? Art, he decided, was irrelevant amidst the gnawing deprivation.

?Here I was thinking about making a big splash, a hit record, going home
a
hero, and I?m walking the streets with motherfuckers who don?t even know

what a piece of bread is, let along Stravinsky or Charlie Parker. If
Bird
was alive and played for them they wouldn?t be able to hear him because
they?d be too damn hungry.?

Admittedly, jazz had always been the preserve of Bombay?s elite. But
while
the audiences were upper crust, the musicians who cooked up the
syncopated
rhythms were not. Like Toni Pinto, Ronnie Monserrate, Chris and Lorna,
the
majority were Roman Catholics strivers from the former Portuguese colony
of
Goa, 550 kilometres south of Bombay. They?d been an important part of
the
Bombay music scene since the 1920s, when Bombay began to develop its
appetite for what was then called ?hot music?. Jazz had made its way
from
New Orleans in the waxy grooves of phonograph records and travelled over

the oceans with touring American bands that played for the
administrators
of the Raj. Bombay?s first jazz concerts were performed at the
Bandstand,
south of the Oval. Among the earliest jazzmen to play an extended stint
in
Bombay was Leon Abbey, a violinist from Minnesota, who led an
eight-piece
band at the Taj during the 1935-?36 season. Abbey wore white tails on
stage
and played the freshest sounds. He told one interviewer, ?I kept up with

the latest numbers because someone would always come up to the bandstand

and say, ?Old Bean, would you play so and so
?, because as far as he was

concerned, we should know how to play everything that had ever been
written.? Midway through the trip, the Taj management sent Abbey and
saxophonist Art Lanier back to New York to pick up the latest music.

Abbey?s outfit was replaced by the Symphonians, fronted by the cornet
player Cricket Smith. Smith had been featured on the seminal recordings
made by James Reese Europe?s Society Orchestra in 1913 and 1914,
capturing
jazz at the moment of its transition from the relatively unsophisticated

ragtime style. Smith ?signed his contract for a fixed amount of money
and
two Coronas a day, so every day, the manager would have to bring him his

cigars?, recalls Luis Moreno, a Spanish trumpet player who lived in
Bombay
for 20 years. ?He was a character.?

In 1938, pianist Teddy Weatherford, who had played with Louis Armstrong,

took the stage with his men. His swinging style and treble voicing had
been
an important influence on jazz during its formative years. The Taj, it
would seem, wasn?t quite the genteel venue it now is not at least from

the way Weatherford?s occasional Russian bassist named ?Innocent Nick?
described the gigs to the jazz magazine Storyville. ?Teddy used to play
downstairs, in the Tavern of the Taj, for the soldiers, sailors and
others,
a very rough place,? Nick said. ?Teddy would play for hours without a
break. Even with drinks, he would continue one-handed. He had tremendous

hands.?

For the African-American musicians, Bombay provided refuge from the
apartheid in the U.S. Men like Weatherford and his sidemen, such as the
saxophonist Roy Butler, spent long years shuttling between Europe and
the
subcontinent, where racial barriers seemed non-existent, at least for
them.
Butler?s years in India as a Weatherford sideman, he told Storyville,
were
among his happiest the work was relatively easy, the pay and conditions

good, he was treated splendidly by both management and clientele, and
enjoyed the luxurious life under the British Raj. The Taj management, on

its part, honoured Weatherford by naming a dish after him: Poires Glace
Weatherford. (The absence of colour prejudice was only to be expected.
After all, industrial baron Jamshetji Tata was moved to build the Taj
after
being prevented one leisurely Bombay evening from dining at the
Europeans-only Pyrke?s Apollo Hotel. Later, he famously hung a notice in

the Taj forbidding entry to South Africans and dogs.)

Weatherford?s sidemen were an eclectic lot and opened Bombay?s ears to a

wealth of new sounds, the Cuban drumming of Luis Pedroso and the Spanish

brass of Luis Moreno, among them. Butler, who was known as the Reverend
in
acknowledgement of his abstemious ways, helped Weatherford drill the
band.
Moreno characterised Butler as the ?gentleman of the orchestra?. Moreno
added, ?He never drank in his life and if someone said, ?How about a
round
of drink?? Roy would say, ?I?ll have an ice-cream. You enjoy beer, I
enjoy
ice-cream.? Butler went on to lead his own band at Greens, located where

the Taj Intercontinental now stands.

Both Weatherford (who married an Anglo-Indian woman, before dying of
cholera in Calcutta in 1945, aged 41) and Butler recruited Goan sidemen,

plugging Bombay into the source of jazz. The trumpet player Frank
Fernand,
who played in Weatherford band with his Goan compatriots, Micky Correa
and
Josique Menzies, says that his stint with the American taught him to
?play
like a negro?. Moreno helped Fernand develop the ability to hit long,
high
notes, eventually extending his range up to E flat. Butler, it must be
noted, was less than thrilled with his Goan employees. ?My short stretch
as
a bandleader in India was not too earth-shaking,? he told Storyville.
?The
local musicians were not too familiar with jazz at that time. I
understood
that there are some very good jazzmen out there now, but the time was
too
short for anything to develop, good or bad.? For their part, some of the

Goan musicians weren?t overly impressed with Butler, either. They
believed
his decision to stay in India was motivated by the fear that he wouldn?t

find work in the US. As Fernand put it, ?The faltu fellows stayed, the
good
ones went home.?





----
Continued in Part 2
----





This article in Word format was sent to me, on request, by the Editor of

MansWorld Magazine, N.Radhakrishnan, thus saving me the trouble of
typing
it out. Please reciprocate his good gesture by visiting the site
http://www.mansworldindia.com


Cheers!

Cecil


====



########################################################################
##
# Send submissions for Goanet to goanet at goanet.org
#
# PLEASE remember to stay on-topic (related to Goa), and avoid top-posts
#
# More details on Goanet at http://joingoanet.shorturl.com/
#
# Please keep your discussion/tone polite, to reflect respect to others
#
########################################################################
##

------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor ---------------------~-->
Low on Ink? Get 80% off inkjet cartridges & Free Shipping at
77Colors.com.
We have your brand: HP, Epson, Lexmark, Canon, Compaq and more!
http://www.c1tracking.com/l.asp?cid=5981
http://us.click.yahoo.com/DmnqpB/IyhGAA/ySSFAA/8XQrlB/TM
---------------------------------------------------------------------~->

To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
aldona-net-unsubscribe at yahoogroups.com



Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
Bernado Colaco
2003-08-10 03:49:37 UTC
Permalink
I wonder when Jazz music coming from capitalism was a
part of Goan culture? Ok, Sodam chintalim vehtelem
munon.... was a class act!

Cola?o
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
Hi all,
Great articles on the Goan culture in Bombay in the
1950-1970 and
beyond.
I do wish Bernard Colaco of ?UK / ?Macau and
Constantino Xavier of
Portugal will read these articles and know about
Goan culture and the
artists in the Bombay / Mumbai Diaspora. Regards, GL
===
__________________________________________________
Yahoo! Plus - For a better Internet experience
http://uk.promotions.yahoo.com/yplus/yoffer.html
Gabe Menezes
2003-08-10 17:22:05 UTC
Permalink
Sent: Saturday, August 09, 2003 10:44 AM
Subject: [Goanet]Chris & Lorna (Part 1) - by Naresh Fernandes - MansWorld
magazine July 2003


Love and longing in Mumbai's Jazz Age (Part 1 of 3 Parts)
by Naresh Fernandes - MansWorld magazine July 2003


RESPONSE:

A fantastically written article which not only sheds light on Chris Perry's
and Lorna's story but which also tells us about Bombay's famous jazz of
years gone by. To boot, it gives a history lesson on the migration of Goans
to Bombay and their occupations.

My father was born in Chadan Waddi (Dhobi Thalao). It was from here that he
emigrated as a young man to Nairobi, Kenya. The story goes that he was
always reminiscing about Bombay, so much so that he got given the nick name
Bomboikar. He is dead and gone now. If any one want to know my back ground
from Kenya I only have to tell them that I am Bomboikar's son and
immediately they know where I come from !

Cheers,

Gabe
Bernado Colaco
2003-08-11 12:01:11 UTC
Permalink
Since Goa is a potpouri of cultures let us now accept
capitalistic Jazz as a part of our culture (Thanks to
Goans in Mumbai). I hope this will solve the name
calling issue.:))

--- "Frederick Noronha (FN)" <fred at bytesforall.org>
wrote: > On Sun, 10 Aug 2003, [iso-8859-1] Bernado
Colaco
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
Post by Bernado Colaco
I wonder when Jazz music coming from capitalism
was a
Post by Bernado Colaco
part of Goan culture? Ok, Sodam chintalim vehtelem
munon.... was a class act!
Cola?o
--- Gilbert Lawrence <gilbertlaw at adelphia.net>
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
Hi all,
Great articles on the Goan culture in Bombay in
the
Post by Bernado Colaco
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
1950-1970 and
beyond.
I do wish Bernard Colaco of ?UK / ?Macau and
Constantino Xavier of
Portugal will read these articles and know about
Goan culture and the
artists in the Bombay / Mumbai Diaspora.
Regards, GL
Bernado at his usual xenophobic self. (Even if he
hasn't explained his
real identity, and why he claims to be based in
London while getting his
posts put out via Macau. Neither his claims to know
what pre-1961 Goan
really was, while later claiming he was born
post-1961.)
*What* is Goan culture? What is the culture of Goans
today? Is it
something frozen in time? Is it something restricted
to only one
language? (Prof Peter Nazareth comments that Goans
write in 13
languages.)
If he follow Bernado's twisted logic of "cultural
purity" we could next
be arguing that man originated in Goa...
Or is it something that today encompasses various
continents, various
languages, and the influences that have come to set
on this tiny place on
planet earth?
To one's mind, Goa is a melting pot (of various
people, coming in at
different points of time, and various rulers or
immigrants or invaders,
who have shaped the region into being what it is).
We are a fruit salad
of sorts, and there's nothing wrong with that. Over
the centuries,
different groups have been negotiating cultural and
physical space with
each other, sometimes peacefully and sometimes
violently.
As much as we claim to have wrong done to ourselves,
if we dig deep enough
we'd find that our own groups have wronged others in
the past.
The earlier we acknowledge this reality the better.
To argue that Jazz cannot have anything to do with
Goa is a few steps away
from saying that the Mando cannot be really Goan,
since it was first sung
only sometime around the nineteenth century and, in
any case, has a range
of global influences ranging from the Portuguese and
the European to the
Far East Asian costumes the women-singers wore. Or,
it is close to an
argument that chief minister Parrikar recently
repeated, that English
*cannot* be a legit language in Goa because of its
foreign origins.
All stem from a similar set of insecurities, and a
desire to dominate by
defining things in a way convenient to oneself.
FN
__________________________________________________
Yahoo! Plus - For a better Internet experience
http://uk.promotions.yahoo.com/yplus/yoffer.html
Eugene Correia
2003-08-11 14:38:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gabe Menezes
A fantastically written article which not only sheds
light on Chris Perry's
and Lorna's story but which also tells us about
Bombay's famous jazz of
years gone by. To boot, it gives a history lesson on
the migration of Goans
to Bombay and their occupations.
Cheers,
Gabe
Naresh's piece is good reading at least for many who
were not aware of the role of Goans in Mumbai's music
world.
But Naresh's saying that people said Chris left his
wife and family for Lorna isn't true. That Chris
wouldn't abandon his wife and family was one of the
issues in Chris and Lorna's relationship.
Chris was domineering, to say the least. He
"controlled" Lorna and, according to some, he made a
contract with Lorna that will never sing for anyone
except him.
Even after their break-up he tried his best to prevent
her from singing for bands and in films. He and his
brothers and friends would create trouble for bands
who engaged Lorna to sign for weddings and parties.
Chris was a "dada" in the Goan music world. He and his
brother Paul were "toughies" and none dared to mess
with them.
I often saw Chris and Lorna arguing near Lorna's home
late at nights. I would nod a hello and proceed or
sometimes ignore them. They, along with other
Dhobitalao musicians, eat at a roadside stall.
They would come walking across Cross Maidan where a
new restaurant had opened (forget name), long after
their Venice days.
At my meetings with Orlando and others, we often
discussed Goan musicians. Many of those names Naresh
has mentioned came up.
I knew some of them or saw some of them in action. I
had once a long talk with Frank Fernand on the
contribution of Goans to Hindi film music. Maybe,
Naresh's third part will have more names such as
Sebastian Fernandes, whose son lives in Toronto. He
was one of the greatest "arranger" in Hindi film
industry.
Need to hear of another jazz great, Braz Gonsalves.
Still a big name in the jazz world. Made an
unsuccessful stint in Toronto where he migrated. He
returned back. I believe Braz's wife, Yvonne, a singer
in her own right, is one of Chic Chocolate's daughter
(nee verification).
Braz's daughter is an accomplished singer. She didn't
migrate as her boyfriend and she were in a band
playign at the Taj.
We had long talks during his brief stay in Toronto,
and earlier when he and Chris came for the First Int'l
Goan Convention in 1988. Both together were great, and
the recording of their show on casette is a treasure.
I am not sure if copies are still available.
After my dad retired from Indian Navy (civilian), he
played in the Hindi film music. During his Navy days
he played occasionally for the Bombay Orchestra, and
often at the Grand Hotel (Ballard Estate) for D'Mello
and his quartet, which played chamber music.
He would tell me many stories of fine musicians of his
time and before him. Wish I had made notes of it.
Someone asked how Naresh may have sourced it. One of
his best sources could be Dr. Thereza Albuquerque. Her
book, The Catholics of Bombay, deals with musicians
and many of the names are mentioned there. If anyone
has a chance to read it, please do so.
Besides, Ronnie Monserrate is another source. But
Ronnie was young to know many things and most of the
tales have been passed his father's generation to his
own.
He quoted Anglo-Lusitanian, a fine paper. Another good
source is perhaps Goan World, and copies of it are
lying with the Heras Institute at St. Xavier's in
Mumbai.
Naresh is young (perhaps in his mid30s), and I met him
when he was in New York working for the Wall Street
Journal. When I learnt he was leaving WSJ to go back
to the Times of India as news editor or deputy news
editor, I sent him an email asking why he was leaving
a good job.
His reply that the US doesn't interest him, and he
needs to do journalism where he could be a
contributing force.
Gilbert Lawrence
2003-08-12 00:27:23 UTC
Permalink
Please disregard the prior post. OR the subject need to be changed to
"Vishy Washy's stand on Rape".

Response:
This is the strangest apologetic response I have ever read. Is the
following what you will tell the girl you just raped? Is this what you
will tell her parents and brothers and elders and the law?

Here is another suggestion. Go over the post you made on "Rape" with
your Mother and your father. Perhaps they will enlighten you - better
late than never!!!.

I do not feel like sending you my regards. GL

-----------------------------------------
You guys are turning out Vishwanath into Pepsi and Coca-cola. Things are
blown out of proportion.

Regards
Vishwanath

----------------

Well said Gilbert!

Remember now, these are the people who are the public faces of the Right
Wing Hindutva movement ( just as wicked as the Rt Wing Nuts among
Muslims and alleged Christians ).

I would have excused this vile comment from Mr. Shirwaikar if

1. He made a slip
2. He was being glib or
3. He was not conversant in the English language
Gilbert Lawrence
2003-08-12 01:03:23 UTC
Permalink
Eugene Correia writes:
Naresh's piece is good reading at least for many who were not aware of
the role of Goans in Mumbai's music world.

Comment:
Great and informative piece by Naresh Fernandes. This was a very well
researched article. From the responses, the Bombay Goans were very
nostalgic. And those Goans, who left Goa and Bombay bypassing all this
culture, got a lesson on Goan culture in Bombay.

One of the reasons why Goan culture in Bombay flourished and prospered-
perhaps more than in Goa was because of the market place. In Bombay
there were the financial resources of the listeners and the clientele
who appreciated that music and dance. Most of the clientele for these
Goan Musical Greats were rich Bombaywallas who frequented the night
clubs, other club houses, ritzy eating establishments and Bollywood.

But before the Goans became Greats in Bombay and in Naresh Fernandes'
article, the 'not so rich' Goans supported and nourished the Goan
artists. Here may be a learning lesson for the current Goan Diasporas.
But before we get to that, the breeding ground for young musically
inclined Goan boys to develop and polish their act were the Goan
functions - weddings and dances (through out the year and specially
Christmas and New Year season) hosted by the Catholic Gymkhana, Byculla
Mechanics, the Bandra gymkhana etc.

The foremost to stimulate the spirit of competition and excellence were
the "Teens and Tunes" musical and dance competitions. The article did
not mention about this institution and whether it still exists. Perhaps
some GoaNetters form Bombay may enlighten us on this. In the seventies,
we had the high school and college 4-5 member band groups with names
like: five stars, Caravels, Drifters, Gay Dukes, Gemini four to name a
few, among many others that vied for the annual top three spots in the
young Goan music world. These young boys were basically home grown
without fancy/expensive equipment that struggled and were motivated to
learn and master the art. There were no school or college music
departments as we have in the USA.

In the Goan Diaspora, with all the support system in the schools and in
the home, we have not been able to stimulate many young Goan boys and
girls into music. And those that made it did so on their own without
much Goan community support. The only time the Goan community
appreciated these artists was after the world at large gave them
accolades and recognized their talent. Perhaps Toronto has some Goan
young music groups. But to the best of my knowledge New York City and
Chicago do not have any. How can the community nurture that talent?
Every Indian function I attend has performances by 7-15 year-old boys
and girls on Indian music and dance and that is great.

This is a call to action by the Goan community in the Diaspora!!!
Gilbert Lawrence
2003-08-12 03:44:11 UTC
Permalink
Hi Helga,
I thank you for your correction. The point I was making, the artists
cannot live on their art and neither they nor their art can thrive if
there are no paying customers or clientele (when they are alive). Or
else they will be like Van Gough etc. It is for the community to
support them and appreciate their work during their life time as well as
in their formative years.

You will have to admit while there were some "pobre fidalgos" in Goa,
the vast majority of "pre-1961" Goans could not afford the luxury of
art. Furthermore some "empregados" who lived in the "big city" of Panjim
and Margao had electricity and transportation to go to attend cultural
functions. In small village "pre-1961", there was just the church music
and weddings where the same old music and Konkani Cantaram and mandos
were played and sung. The only musician of repute in a village what the
choir master. Or was I living in a different part of Goa than you?

Gilbert.

----------
Gilbert, perhaps you meant that JAZZ flourished in Bombay more than in
Goa
because Goan culture has always flourished in Goa! Our mandos and our
tiatros will never die. Jazz was popular with the well heeled
'Bombaywallas'
probably because they were exposed to music in English whereas in Goa
Konkani and Portuguese music was more appreciated.
The article by Naresh Ferandes was excellent - he have us a glimpse
into a
Bombay we had not imagined. I chanced upon another of his articles TOMB
RAIDER -Looking for St. Francis Xavier which can be found at
http://www.transitionmagazine.com/online/tombraider.htm
Its hilarious and I think everyone will enjoy it. There is a verse or a
poem
by Eunice de Souza which could have been my old aunt speaking!
---Helga
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
One of the reasons why Goan culture in Bombay flourished and
prospered-
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
perhaps more than in Goa was because of the market place.
########################################################################
##
# Send submissions for Goanet to goanet at goanet.org
#
# PLEASE remember to stay on-topic (related to Goa), and avoid top-posts
#
# More details on Goanet at http://joingoanet.shorturl.com/
#
# Please keep your discussion/tone polite, to reflect respect to others
#
########################################################################
##
Thomas Albrecht
2003-08-12 11:21:44 UTC
Permalink
Hello

Is somebody there, who can tell me, if it is possible to go by ship from
mumbai to Goa or back in the upcoming winter season? And is there a link/url
for that?

One more question I would have:

I was invited a few years ago by the son of Dr Monteiro (whom I did knew
too in 1972!) in Candolim to book at his place, when I will came to Goa. But
I lost the adress. As I will be in Goa at Xmas - I would ask, if anybody
knows his internet/e-mail adress

Thank you so much

Thomas Albrecht
Germany




##########################################################################
# Send submissions for Goanet to goanet at goanet.org #

# PLEASE remember to stay on-topic (related to Goa), and avoid top-posts #
# More details on Goanet at http://joingoanet.shorturl.com/ #
# Please keep your discussion/tone polite, to reflect respect to others #
##########################################################################
Eugene Correia
2003-08-13 02:20:18 UTC
Permalink
The classic jazz may not have been heard in Goa before
1961. Pieces such as Helga mentioned -- Satchmo's What
a Wonderful World -- was played by the 'swing bands'.
Jazz didn't bloom in Bombay till the late 60s. Prior
to the 60s, there was a mixture of jazz and "big band"
music. Chris Perry was influenced by Miles Davis and
he named one of his sons after the jazz legend. Chris
also tried to imitate the sounds of Louis Armstrong,
especially Hello Dolly.
But classic jazz, of the New Orleans type, was
confined to places like Venic and Gaylord.
I covered the first Jazz Yatra in 1978 at the Rang
Bhavan. It was a great experience listening to Sonny
Rollins.
I also enjoyed Japan's Sadao Watanabe Quintet, who
played some swing.
The Indian group included Louis Banks and Braz
Gonsalves. Rudy Cotton was also there.
Niranjan Jhaveri organized the Jazz Yatra, and I
believe he still does it.

Eugene Correia

__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software
http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com
Gilbert Lawrence
2003-08-13 04:15:19 UTC
Permalink
Hi Helga,

Thanks for your polite response and for clarifying the culture /music
scene in Goa. You are right that we wrongly compare and get defensive.
We need to compare and look for any learning lessons / opportunities to
improve.

In my post I was not talking about jazz in Goa and not even Jazz in
Bombay. I am an authority on neither. My taste (and I know little about
it) is just good-old dance music.

I was not talking about the music /art greats in Bombay, Goa or NY. I
was talking about how to get there (to the top). And what can the Goan
community do to help our youth to get there and in the process enrich
Goan culture for the masses. Does Goa (and Bombay) currently have any
music (solo and band) and singing competitions (like 'Teens and Tunes')
in the various villages and talukas - - Not at the state level for the
'Greats'?

Regards, Gilbert.

----------------------------------------------------------------
Hi Gilbert!
I wasnt correcting you just clarifying!
Yes patronage of the arts or the lack of it is a very old problem - even
older than Van Gogh and artists who have been encouraged by kings and
wealthy men and women should consider themselves lucky for there are
many
who have not. In India we have not laid great emphasis on the Arts in
the
schools either.But even with all this apathy we still produced Emiliano
Cruz, Remo Fernandes and so many talented tiatristas!
But comparing Goa and Bombay as many people tend to do doesnt really
make
sense - Goa was and still is a very small place that charms everyone
while
Bombay is a metropolis with money. So its understandable that musicians
gravitated to it then and now - wasn't that what the Big Apple was all
about? I heard that all the great jazz and blues singers said that you
hadn't made it until you had plucked the Big Apple which was New York. I
could be wrong about the origin of term but not about the importance of
making it big in NY.
I cant really comment on what pre- 1961 Goa was like - mine are just
stories
woven by my mother and her family for the entertainment of my sister
and I.
And I do not know what the 'pobre fidalgos' were doing either -
probably
living their lives of 'pobreza' and 'fidalguice'! Well if they were
'pobres'
then that counts them out as patrons of music. As far as I know the
'ricos'
were using their money to built elaborate mansions stuffed with
chandeliers
and Macao chinaware. Which reminds me that everyone has got to read
Naresh's
other article - its about Macao and its very funny!
--Helga



----- Original Message -----
From: "Gilbert Lawrence" <gilbertlaw at adelphia.net>
To: <goanet at goanet.org>
Sent: Monday, August 11, 2003 11:44 PM
Subject: RE: [Goanet]Another article by Naresh Fernandes
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
Hi Helga,
I thank you for your correction. The point I was making, the artists
cannot live on their art and neither they nor their art can thrive if
there are no paying customers or clientele (when they are alive). Or
else they will be like Van Gough etc. It is for the community to
support them and appreciate their work during their life time as well
as
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
in their formative years.
You will have to admit while there were some "pobre fidalgos" in Goa,
the vast majority of "pre-1961" Goans could not afford the luxury of
art. Furthermore some "empregados" who lived in the "big city" of
Panjim
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
and Margao had electricity and transportation to go to attend cultural
functions. In small village "pre-1961", there was just the church
music
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
and weddings where the same old music and Konkani Cantaram and mandos
were played and sung. The only musician of repute in a village what
the
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
choir master. Or was I living in a different part of Goa than you?
########################################################################
##
# Send submissions for Goanet to goanet at goanet.org
#
# PLEASE remember to stay on-topic (related to Goa), and avoid top-posts
#
# More details on Goanet at http://joingoanet.shorturl.com/
#
# Please keep your discussion/tone polite, to reflect respect to others
#
########################################################################
##
gilbert
2003-08-13 04:26:50 UTC
Permalink
--- In Goanet2003 at yahoogroups.com, "Frederick Noronha (FN)"
Post by Frederick Noronha (FN)
A hovercraft that was launched on this route sometime in the
'nineties
Post by Frederick Noronha (FN)
could not be sustained due to choppy seas, missed trips and the
fact that
Post by Frederick Noronha (FN)
the costly (made-in-Europe) hovercraft were quite close to the then
plane-fares.
-------------------------------------------------------
Fred,
it wasnt a hovercraft, which rides on a cushion of air, with no
underwater drag, but a catamaran, whose underwater dynamic shape
produces lift and reduces drag, thus increasing its speed, unlike a
conventional hull. An hovercraft can beach on hard land, while a
catamaran requires a jetty for passengers to disembark.
regards, Gilbert.
James Almeida
2003-08-13 11:14:37 UTC
Permalink
From: "Eddie Fernandes" <eddie at fernandes.u-net.com>
Reply-To: goanet at goanet.org
To: <goanet at goanet.org>
Subject: Re: [Goanet]Ship from mumbai to goa?
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2003 08:15:44 +0100
Headline: Indian cruise liners to tap foreign and upmarket desi tourists
Source: Economic Times of India, 3 Aug. 2003 at
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/cms.dll/html/uncomp/articleshow?msid=110306
BANGALORE: The Ministry of Shipping plans to start a domestic "cruise
shipping" service along the west coast on the lines of "Palace on Wheels"
to
cater to foreign and upmarket domestic tourists.
"We want to start domestic cruise shipping, something on the pattern of
Palace on Wheels," Union Minister for Shipping Shatrughan Sinha told PTI
here.
I'm just curious whether the government has any competences to enter and
compete in the cruise ship business. I am positive that "Shotgun" Sinha
does not! :-) This would be a utter wastage of the taxpayer monies.
Would it not be better to leave these initiatives to the private sector?

Best,
James

_________________________________________________________________
STOP MORE SPAM with the new MSN 8 and get 2 months FREE*
http://join.msn.com/?page=features/junkmail
gilbert
2003-08-13 14:45:09 UTC
Permalink
--- In Goanet2003 at yahoogroups.com, "James Almeida" <goanet at g...>
Post by James Almeida
I'm just curious whether the government has any competences to
enter and
Post by James Almeida
compete in the cruise ship business. I am positive that "Shotgun"
Sinha
Post by James Almeida
does not! :-) This would be a utter wastage of the taxpayer
monies.
Post by James Almeida
Would it not be better to leave these initiatives to the private
sector?
Post by James Almeida
Best,
James
------------------------------------------------
You're dead right about the lack of competence because it has been
proven for the nth time that whatever the govt. runs in the travel
and hospitality industry is loss making. In the case of palace on
wheels, the losses are huge because the pricing is too steep, and the
biggest users are govt. bureaucrats taking a free ride with their
families. Even take the case of Goa where the govt. runs hotels in
margao, panjim, mapuca, colva and calangute-all loss making, and
still the govt. has only recently sunk a huge amount of money in
renovating them.Why, you may ask? Simple- rooms are subsidised for
Govt employees, and politicians! The corruption which continues is
mind boggling. The socialist lessons of the soviet union are
difficult to give up, believe me.
regards, Gilbert.
Cecil Pinto
2003-08-09 09:44:31 UTC
Permalink
Love and longing in Mumbai?s Jazz Age (Part 1 of 3 Parts)
by Naresh Fernandes - MansWorld magazine July 2003



For over five decades, well into the late 1960s before prohibition,
taxation and rock-and-roll killed it, Mumbai boasted of one of the most
vibrant jazz scenes in the world, outside of the US. On Churchgate Street,
stretching from the Marine Drive sea front all the way up to Flora
Fountain the sound of jazz spilled out through the doors of packed night
clubs like Ambassador, Napoli, The Talk of the Town, Gaylord?s, Ritz,
Little Hut, Bistro and Volga. Not to speak of the Rendezvous at the Taj.
The legendary pianist and composer Dave Brubeck was impressed enough by the
local musicians to attempt to make some recordings during one of his
visits. Set against this backdrop is the tragic love affair of tenor
saxophonist and band leader Chris Perry and singer Lorna Cordeiro. Naresh
Fernandes tells their story for the first time.


---------


Their eyes give it away. Chris Perry wears a slick black jacket, the
sleeves of his crisp white shirt revealing the glint of dark cuff links.
His fingers clasp a gleaming tenor saxophone with a lover?s
gentleness. Arms crossed coquettishly above her waist, Lorna Cordeiro is
chic in a bouffant and a form-fitting gown that shows a flash of ankle.
They stare into each other?s eyes, mesmerised. Behind them looms a giant
camera aperture borrowed from the opening sequence of the Bond films.

You couldn?t miss the poster as you sauntered down Jamshetji Tata Road in
downtown Bombay. It hung outside the Astoria Hotel, across the street from
the octagonal Art Deco turret of Eros cinema, inviting the city to Chris
and Lorna?s daily shows at the Venice nightclub. It was 1971. India was
savouring its newfound place on the world?s stage. The country?s armed
forces had decisively liberated Bangladesh and the idealism of Independence
had welled up again. India?s middle classes were capturing their polyester
memories on Agfa Click IIIs that cost 46.50 rupees (taxes extra), aspiring
to the lifestyles of ?The Jet Set Air Hostesses? described in The
Illustrated Weekly of India (price: 85 paise), and being encouraged by
newspaper ads to ?Go gay with Gaylord fine filter cigarettes?.

As the City of Gold bubbled through its jazz age, Lorna and Chris
enthralled Bombay with their shows at Venice each night. Remo Fernandes,
who would go on to become the first Indian pop musician to record an album
of original English-language tunes, was among those locked in the spell.
?Two artists sometimes ignite a creative chemistry in each other which goes
beyond all logical explanation. Mere mortals can only look and listen in
awe,? he rhapsodised. ?In such duos, one plus one does not make two. It
makes a number so immeasurable, it defies all laws of calculus.?

But the sparks that flew at Venice gradually built into a roaring
conflagration. As Remo put it: ?Hyper-intense, high-temperament artistic
relationships often end in emotional disaster, like two comets when they
steer too dangerously close. Chris?s and Lorna?s, as we all know, was no
exception.?

Like the myths about the city in which they soared to fame, the tale of
Chris and Lorna has gained so much in the re-telling it?s sometimes
difficult to thresh the apocrypha from the actual. Thirty years after the
two stopped performing together, old-time musicians in the bylanes of Dhobi
Talao and Bandra still beg anonymity as they reminisce in sad whispers.

?He was shameless. He left his wife and three small children for that girl.?

?Chris and Lorna were in love. When they fought, they became mortal
enemies. He destroyed her and he destroyed himself.?

?She was very good singer. Beyond that, she was nothing. She got her break
with Chris Perry. He made contract with her. She couldn?t sing without his
permission. She had no brains, so she signed. Then he went back to his wife.?

?He didn?t let her perform with anyone else. He threatened to break the
legs of one Hindu fellow who tried to get her to sing with him.?

?She hit the bottle, men. She became an alcoholic and just disappeared.?

Chris Perry who was born Pereira died on January 25, 2002, his last years
hobbled by Parkinson?s disease. Lorna has refused to recount her version of
events for publication. But the fidelity of her contralto booming out of
our speakers, embroidered with Chris?s perfectly crafted sax filigrees,
speaks its own truth.


Ronnie Monserrate was 19 when he began to play Sunday gigs at Venice with
the Chris Perry band, sitting in for the regular pianist. Venice had a
reputation. It was the jazzman?s jazz haunt, the rendezvous for musicians
from around the country and occasionally from around the world. Dave
Brubeck swung by when he visited Bombay in 1958, as Duke Ellington had when
his band set out on their famous world tour of 1963. As Ronnie tells it,
the dapper Chris Perry was the musician?s musician: ?He had perfect pitch.
He was an arranger, a composer, a player.? Chris played both trumpet and
saxophone, sometimes switching from one to the other mid-tune, a feat that
required elaborate lip control. His trumpet tone was broad and true. He
didn?t have flashy technique, but the notes he coaxed out of his horn had a
mellowness that kept the fans coming back night after night.

Chris was 43 at the time, Lorna was 25. No one seems quite sure exactly how
they met, but everyone?s agreed that he groomed her into one of the
Bombay?s finest crooners. One version maintains that Lorna got her break
when still in school, after she won the Connie Francis soundalike
competition at Metro cinema. This prompted a musician named Raymond
Albuqerque to invite her to sing in his show at the Bandra Fair. Her
rendition of Underneath the Mango Tree got the crowds so fired up that
Chris Perry, already an established performer, went to her home to audition
her. She was just 16 when she joined Perry?s band.

A vocalist in the Shirley Bassey mould, Lorna belted out every tune like it
was her last time on stage. ?She had a lot of black feel,? is how Ronnie
describes her performances. ?You could see the intensity when she was on
stage. She?d give it her best, every time. She was like a magnet. You
couldn?t help but be attracted to her when she was on stage. And with Chris
Perry band by her side, it was like magic happening. There was incredible
attraction. There was a lot of love in the interaction. It was apparent in
their body language. They brought out the best in each other. They?d look
into each other?s eyes and their understanding was so great that there?d be
spontaneous combustion.?

Offstage, though, things could get awkward. Any man attempting to talk to
Lorna was liable to get a taste of Perry?s famously volatile fists. During
breaks, the musicians would sit around their table, absolutely silent.
?They were jolly people but they were afraid to laugh around Chris,? Ronnie
says. Ronnie was the only exception, perhaps because his youth made him
seem unthreatening. Two decades later, he?d find opportunity to call in
that bond of trust.

Venice was around the corner from Bombay?s swinging jazz strip, Churchgate
Street (now Veer Nariman Road). Pianists, trios and quartets were to be
heard all the way down the 200-metre thoroughfare as it led off from
Churchgate station to the Arabian Sea. First came Berry?s, with tandoori
butter chicken that was the stuff of Bombay legend and accomplished
piano-fronted groups led by Dorothy Jones and Stanley Pinto. Across the
fence was Bombelli?s, named after its Swiss owner, where a trio held sway
as ad men sipped cappuccinos. Then came the Ambassador, where Toni Pinto?s
quintet encapsulated Bombay?s diversity: the group had two Jews a singer
named Ephrim Elias and drummer Abie Cohen, an Anglo-Indian tenor
saxophonist named Norman Mobsby, and, in addition to Pinto, another Goan,
the bassist Clement Furtado.

Pinto?s kingdom was named the Other Room, so called because after the rich
and famous had finished drinking at the bar, they?d say, ?Let?s go to the
other room.? He ruled for 16 years from 1958, his sharply dressed group
spinning out hard-driving bop and light classics, and playing back-up for
cabarets and visiting acrobats, magicians and flamenco dancers. The
Ambassador was owned by the cigar-chomping Jack Voyantzis, an ebullient
Greek who was assisted by his brother, Socrates. The siblings had started
their subcontinental journey in Rangoon, opened a caf? in Delhi, and
finally found their way to Bombay, where they transformed a hotel known as
the Argentinian into the Ambassador. The cream of Bombay society turned out
to catch Toni?s tightly-rehearsed band. Toni remembers once looking up from
his piano to see three of the city?s leading editors appreciatively tapping
their feet: Rusi Karanjia, editor of the left-wing tabloid Blitz, D F
Karaka, editor of the rival Current, and Frank Moraes, editor of the Indian
Express, with his American girlfriend. Another time, as the band was going
through its routine, Toni realised that someone from the back of the room
was playing along on a trumpet. It turned out to be American hornman Eddie
Calvert. ?He came for dinner one night even though he was staying at the
Ritz,? Toni says, and he asked his drummer, Bobby Hadrian, to go back and
get his instrument. Calvert and Toni?s band jammed for an hour, playing
the tunes the American had made famous: Cherry Pink, Begin the Beguine,
Wonderland by Night.

Elsewhere on Churchgate Street, music spilled out through the doors of the
Napoli, The Talk of the Town and Gaylord?s. Opposite Venice, there was jazz
at the Ritz, while at the Little Hut, Neville Thomas led a group calling
itself Three Guys and a Doll. Past Flora Fountain stood Bistro and Volga,
home to a quartet led by the grandfatherly baritone saxophonist Hecke
Kingdom.

Dave Brubeck was impressed enough by the local musicians to attempt to make
some recordings with them during his visit. But Bombay defeated him. He
later recounted the episode to an interviewer: ?The current fluctuated in
Bombay in those days and so the tape would speed up and slow down. Like,
when you were shaving, the speed of the motor would go up and down. It
ruined one of my favourite tapes I've ever made.? Another visiting jazzman,
the pianist Hampton Hawes, was overwhelmed by problems that were rather
more basic. ?Bombay turned me around,? he wrote. ?I?d never seen poverty
before.? Art, he decided, was irrelevant amidst the gnawing deprivation.
?Here I was thinking about making a big splash, a hit record, going home a
hero, and I?m walking the streets with motherfuckers who don?t even know
what a piece of bread is, let along Stravinsky or Charlie Parker. If Bird
was alive and played for them they wouldn?t be able to hear him because
they?d be too damn hungry.?

Admittedly, jazz had always been the preserve of Bombay?s elite. But while
the audiences were upper crust, the musicians who cooked up the syncopated
rhythms were not. Like Toni Pinto, Ronnie Monserrate, Chris and Lorna, the
majority were Roman Catholics strivers from the former Portuguese colony of
Goa, 550 kilometres south of Bombay. They?d been an important part of the
Bombay music scene since the 1920s, when Bombay began to develop its
appetite for what was then called ?hot music?. Jazz had made its way from
New Orleans in the waxy grooves of phonograph records and travelled over
the oceans with touring American bands that played for the administrators
of the Raj. Bombay?s first jazz concerts were performed at the Bandstand,
south of the Oval. Among the earliest jazzmen to play an extended stint in
Bombay was Leon Abbey, a violinist from Minnesota, who led an eight-piece
band at the Taj during the 1935-?36 season. Abbey wore white tails on stage
and played the freshest sounds. He told one interviewer, ?I kept up with
the latest numbers because someone would always come up to the bandstand
and say, ?Old Bean, would you play so and so
?, because as far as he was
concerned, we should know how to play everything that had ever been
written.? Midway through the trip, the Taj management sent Abbey and
saxophonist Art Lanier back to New York to pick up the latest music.

Abbey?s outfit was replaced by the Symphonians, fronted by the cornet
player Cricket Smith. Smith had been featured on the seminal recordings
made by James Reese Europe?s Society Orchestra in 1913 and 1914, capturing
jazz at the moment of its transition from the relatively unsophisticated
ragtime style. Smith ?signed his contract for a fixed amount of money and
two Coronas a day, so every day, the manager would have to bring him his
cigars?, recalls Luis Moreno, a Spanish trumpet player who lived in Bombay
for 20 years. ?He was a character.?

In 1938, pianist Teddy Weatherford, who had played with Louis Armstrong,
took the stage with his men. His swinging style and treble voicing had been
an important influence on jazz during its formative years. The Taj, it
would seem, wasn?t quite the genteel venue it now is not at least from
the way Weatherford?s occasional Russian bassist named ?Innocent Nick?
described the gigs to the jazz magazine Storyville. ?Teddy used to play
downstairs, in the Tavern of the Taj, for the soldiers, sailors and others,
a very rough place,? Nick said. ?Teddy would play for hours without a
break. Even with drinks, he would continue one-handed. He had tremendous
hands.?

For the African-American musicians, Bombay provided refuge from the
apartheid in the U.S. Men like Weatherford and his sidemen, such as the
saxophonist Roy Butler, spent long years shuttling between Europe and the
subcontinent, where racial barriers seemed non-existent, at least for them.
Butler?s years in India as a Weatherford sideman, he told Storyville, were
among his happiest the work was relatively easy, the pay and conditions
good, he was treated splendidly by both management and clientele, and
enjoyed the luxurious life under the British Raj. The Taj management, on
its part, honoured Weatherford by naming a dish after him: Poires Glace
Weatherford. (The absence of colour prejudice was only to be expected.
After all, industrial baron Jamshetji Tata was moved to build the Taj after
being prevented one leisurely Bombay evening from dining at the
Europeans-only Pyrke?s Apollo Hotel. Later, he famously hung a notice in
the Taj forbidding entry to South Africans and dogs.)

Weatherford?s sidemen were an eclectic lot and opened Bombay?s ears to a
wealth of new sounds, the Cuban drumming of Luis Pedroso and the Spanish
brass of Luis Moreno, among them. Butler, who was known as the Reverend in
acknowledgement of his abstemious ways, helped Weatherford drill the band.
Moreno characterised Butler as the ?gentleman of the orchestra?. Moreno
added, ?He never drank in his life and if someone said, ?How about a round
of drink?? Roy would say, ?I?ll have an ice-cream. You enjoy beer, I enjoy
ice-cream.? Butler went on to lead his own band at Greens, located where
the Taj Intercontinental now stands.

Both Weatherford (who married an Anglo-Indian woman, before dying of
cholera in Calcutta in 1945, aged 41) and Butler recruited Goan sidemen,
plugging Bombay into the source of jazz. The trumpet player Frank Fernand,
who played in Weatherford band with his Goan compatriots, Micky Correa and
Josique Menzies, says that his stint with the American taught him to ?play
like a negro?. Moreno helped Fernand develop the ability to hit long, high
notes, eventually extending his range up to E flat. Butler, it must be
noted, was less than thrilled with his Goan employees. ?My short stretch as
a bandleader in India was not too earth-shaking,? he told Storyville. ?The
local musicians were not too familiar with jazz at that time. I understood
that there are some very good jazzmen out there now, but the time was too
short for anything to develop, good or bad.? For their part, some of the
Goan musicians weren?t overly impressed with Butler, either. They believed
his decision to stay in India was motivated by the fear that he wouldn?t
find work in the US. As Fernand put it, ?The faltu fellows stayed, the good
ones went home.?





----
Continued in Part 2
----





This article in Word format was sent to me, on request, by the Editor of
MansWorld Magazine, N.Radhakrishnan, thus saving me the trouble of typing
it out. Please reciprocate his good gesture by visiting the site
http://www.mansworldindia.com


Cheers!

Cecil


====
Gilbert Lawrence
2003-08-09 16:57:01 UTC
Permalink
Hi all,

Great articles on the Goan culture in Bombay in the 1950-1970 and
beyond.
I do wish Bernard Colaco of ?UK / ?Macau and Constantino Xavier of
Portugal will read these articles and know about Goan culture and the
artists in the Bombay / Mumbai Diaspora. Regards, GL

-----Original Message-----
From: goanet-admin at goanet.org [mailto:goanet-admin at goanet.org] On Behalf
Of Cecil Pinto
Sent: Saturday, August 09, 2003 5:45 AM
To: Goa-Goans at yahoogroups.com; konkaniforum at yahoogroups.com
Cc: aldona-net at yahoogroups.com; goanet at goanet.org
Subject: [aldona-net] [Goanet]Chris & Lorna (Part 1) - by Naresh
Fernandes - MansWorld magazine July 2003

Love and longing in Mumbai?s Jazz Age (Part 1 of 3 Parts)
by Naresh Fernandes - MansWorld magazine July 2003



For over five decades, well into the late 1960s before prohibition,
taxation and rock-and-roll killed it, Mumbai boasted of one of the most
vibrant jazz scenes in the world, outside of the US. On Churchgate
Street,
stretching from the Marine Drive sea front all the way up to Flora
Fountain the sound of jazz spilled out through the doors of packed
night
clubs like Ambassador, Napoli, The Talk of the Town, Gaylord?s, Ritz,
Little Hut, Bistro and Volga. Not to speak of the Rendezvous at the Taj.

The legendary pianist and composer Dave Brubeck was impressed enough by
the
local musicians to attempt to make some recordings during one of his
visits. Set against this backdrop is the tragic love affair of tenor
saxophonist and band leader Chris Perry and singer Lorna Cordeiro.
Naresh
Fernandes tells their story for the first time.


---------


Their eyes give it away. Chris Perry wears a slick black jacket, the
sleeves of his crisp white shirt revealing the glint of dark cuff links.

His fingers clasp a gleaming tenor saxophone with a lover?s
gentleness. Arms crossed coquettishly above her waist, Lorna Cordeiro
is
chic in a bouffant and a form-fitting gown that shows a flash of ankle.
They stare into each other?s eyes, mesmerised. Behind them looms a giant

camera aperture borrowed from the opening sequence of the Bond films.

You couldn?t miss the poster as you sauntered down Jamshetji Tata Road
in
downtown Bombay. It hung outside the Astoria Hotel, across the street
from
the octagonal Art Deco turret of Eros cinema, inviting the city to Chris

and Lorna?s daily shows at the Venice nightclub. It was 1971. India was
savouring its newfound place on the world?s stage. The country?s armed
forces had decisively liberated Bangladesh and the idealism of
Independence
had welled up again. India?s middle classes were capturing their
polyester
memories on Agfa Click IIIs that cost 46.50 rupees (taxes extra),
aspiring
to the lifestyles of ?The Jet Set Air Hostesses? described in The
Illustrated Weekly of India (price: 85 paise), and being encouraged by
newspaper ads to ?Go gay with Gaylord fine filter cigarettes?.

As the City of Gold bubbled through its jazz age, Lorna and Chris
enthralled Bombay with their shows at Venice each night. Remo Fernandes,

who would go on to become the first Indian pop musician to record an
album
of original English-language tunes, was among those locked in the spell.

?Two artists sometimes ignite a creative chemistry in each other which
goes
beyond all logical explanation. Mere mortals can only look and listen in

awe,? he rhapsodised. ?In such duos, one plus one does not make two. It
makes a number so immeasurable, it defies all laws of calculus.?

But the sparks that flew at Venice gradually built into a roaring
conflagration. As Remo put it: ?Hyper-intense, high-temperament artistic

relationships often end in emotional disaster, like two comets when they

steer too dangerously close. Chris?s and Lorna?s, as we all know, was no

exception.?

Like the myths about the city in which they soared to fame, the tale of
Chris and Lorna has gained so much in the re-telling it?s sometimes
difficult to thresh the apocrypha from the actual. Thirty years after
the
two stopped performing together, old-time musicians in the bylanes of
Dhobi
Talao and Bandra still beg anonymity as they reminisce in sad whispers.

?He was shameless. He left his wife and three small children for that
girl.?

?Chris and Lorna were in love. When they fought, they became mortal
enemies. He destroyed her and he destroyed himself.?

?She was very good singer. Beyond that, she was nothing. She got her
break
with Chris Perry. He made contract with her. She couldn?t sing without
his
permission. She had no brains, so she signed. Then he went back to his
wife.?

?He didn?t let her perform with anyone else. He threatened to break the
legs of one Hindu fellow who tried to get her to sing with him.?

?She hit the bottle, men. She became an alcoholic and just disappeared.?

Chris Perry who was born Pereira died on January 25, 2002, his last
years
hobbled by Parkinson?s disease. Lorna has refused to recount her version
of
events for publication. But the fidelity of her contralto booming out of

our speakers, embroidered with Chris?s perfectly crafted sax filigrees,
speaks its own truth.


Ronnie Monserrate was 19 when he began to play Sunday gigs at Venice
with
the Chris Perry band, sitting in for the regular pianist. Venice had a
reputation. It was the jazzman?s jazz haunt, the rendezvous for
musicians
from around the country and occasionally from around the world. Dave
Brubeck swung by when he visited Bombay in 1958, as Duke Ellington had
when
his band set out on their famous world tour of 1963. As Ronnie tells it,

the dapper Chris Perry was the musician?s musician: ?He had perfect
pitch.
He was an arranger, a composer, a player.? Chris played both trumpet and

saxophone, sometimes switching from one to the other mid-tune, a feat
that
required elaborate lip control. His trumpet tone was broad and true. He
didn?t have flashy technique, but the notes he coaxed out of his horn
had a
mellowness that kept the fans coming back night after night.

Chris was 43 at the time, Lorna was 25. No one seems quite sure exactly
how
they met, but everyone?s agreed that he groomed her into one of the
Bombay?s finest crooners. One version maintains that Lorna got her break

when still in school, after she won the Connie Francis soundalike
competition at Metro cinema. This prompted a musician named Raymond
Albuqerque to invite her to sing in his show at the Bandra Fair. Her
rendition of Underneath the Mango Tree got the crowds so fired up that
Chris Perry, already an established performer, went to her home to
audition
her. She was just 16 when she joined Perry?s band.

A vocalist in the Shirley Bassey mould, Lorna belted out every tune like
it
was her last time on stage. ?She had a lot of black feel,? is how Ronnie

describes her performances. ?You could see the intensity when she was
on
stage. She?d give it her best, every time. She was like a magnet. You
couldn?t help but be attracted to her when she was on stage. And with
Chris
Perry band by her side, it was like magic happening. There was
incredible
attraction. There was a lot of love in the interaction. It was apparent
in
their body language. They brought out the best in each other. They?d
look
into each other?s eyes and their understanding was so great that there?d
be
spontaneous combustion.?

Offstage, though, things could get awkward. Any man attempting to talk
to
Lorna was liable to get a taste of Perry?s famously volatile fists.
During
breaks, the musicians would sit around their table, absolutely silent.
?They were jolly people but they were afraid to laugh around Chris,?
Ronnie
says. Ronnie was the only exception, perhaps because his youth made him
seem unthreatening. Two decades later, he?d find opportunity to call in
that bond of trust.

Venice was around the corner from Bombay?s swinging jazz strip,
Churchgate
Street (now Veer Nariman Road). Pianists, trios and quartets were to be
heard all the way down the 200-metre thoroughfare as it led off from
Churchgate station to the Arabian Sea. First came Berry?s, with tandoori

butter chicken that was the stuff of Bombay legend and accomplished
piano-fronted groups led by Dorothy Jones and Stanley Pinto. Across the
fence was Bombelli?s, named after its Swiss owner, where a trio held
sway
as ad men sipped cappuccinos. Then came the Ambassador, where Toni
Pinto?s
quintet encapsulated Bombay?s diversity: the group had two Jews a
singer
named Ephrim Elias and drummer Abie Cohen, an Anglo-Indian tenor
saxophonist named Norman Mobsby, and, in addition to Pinto, another
Goan,
the bassist Clement Furtado.

Pinto?s kingdom was named the Other Room, so called because after the
rich
and famous had finished drinking at the bar, they?d say, ?Let?s go to
the
other room.? He ruled for 16 years from 1958, his sharply dressed group
spinning out hard-driving bop and light classics, and playing back-up
for
cabarets and visiting acrobats, magicians and flamenco dancers. The
Ambassador was owned by the cigar-chomping Jack Voyantzis, an ebullient
Greek who was assisted by his brother, Socrates. The siblings had
started
their subcontinental journey in Rangoon, opened a caf? in Delhi, and
finally found their way to Bombay, where they transformed a hotel known
as
the Argentinian into the Ambassador. The cream of Bombay society turned
out
to catch Toni?s tightly-rehearsed band. Toni remembers once looking up
from
his piano to see three of the city?s leading editors appreciatively
tapping
their feet: Rusi Karanjia, editor of the left-wing tabloid Blitz, D F
Karaka, editor of the rival Current, and Frank Moraes, editor of the
Indian
Express, with his American girlfriend. Another time, as the band was
going
through its routine, Toni realised that someone from the back of the
room
was playing along on a trumpet. It turned out to be American hornman
Eddie
Calvert. ?He came for dinner one night even though he was staying at the

Ritz,? Toni says, and he asked his drummer, Bobby Hadrian, to go back
and
get his instrument. Calvert and Toni?s band jammed for an hour, playing

the tunes the American had made famous: Cherry Pink, Begin the Beguine,
Wonderland by Night.

Elsewhere on Churchgate Street, music spilled out through the doors of
the
Napoli, The Talk of the Town and Gaylord?s. Opposite Venice, there was
jazz
at the Ritz, while at the Little Hut, Neville Thomas led a group calling

itself Three Guys and a Doll. Past Flora Fountain stood Bistro and
Volga,
home to a quartet led by the grandfatherly baritone saxophonist Hecke
Kingdom.

Dave Brubeck was impressed enough by the local musicians to attempt to
make
some recordings with them during his visit. But Bombay defeated him. He
later recounted the episode to an interviewer: ?The current fluctuated
in
Bombay in those days and so the tape would speed up and slow down. Like,

when you were shaving, the speed of the motor would go up and down. It
ruined one of my favourite tapes I've ever made.? Another visiting
jazzman,
the pianist Hampton Hawes, was overwhelmed by problems that were rather
more basic. ?Bombay turned me around,? he wrote. ?I?d never seen poverty

before.? Art, he decided, was irrelevant amidst the gnawing deprivation.

?Here I was thinking about making a big splash, a hit record, going home
a
hero, and I?m walking the streets with motherfuckers who don?t even know

what a piece of bread is, let along Stravinsky or Charlie Parker. If
Bird
was alive and played for them they wouldn?t be able to hear him because
they?d be too damn hungry.?

Admittedly, jazz had always been the preserve of Bombay?s elite. But
while
the audiences were upper crust, the musicians who cooked up the
syncopated
rhythms were not. Like Toni Pinto, Ronnie Monserrate, Chris and Lorna,
the
majority were Roman Catholics strivers from the former Portuguese colony
of
Goa, 550 kilometres south of Bombay. They?d been an important part of
the
Bombay music scene since the 1920s, when Bombay began to develop its
appetite for what was then called ?hot music?. Jazz had made its way
from
New Orleans in the waxy grooves of phonograph records and travelled over

the oceans with touring American bands that played for the
administrators
of the Raj. Bombay?s first jazz concerts were performed at the
Bandstand,
south of the Oval. Among the earliest jazzmen to play an extended stint
in
Bombay was Leon Abbey, a violinist from Minnesota, who led an
eight-piece
band at the Taj during the 1935-?36 season. Abbey wore white tails on
stage
and played the freshest sounds. He told one interviewer, ?I kept up with

the latest numbers because someone would always come up to the bandstand

and say, ?Old Bean, would you play so and so
?, because as far as he was

concerned, we should know how to play everything that had ever been
written.? Midway through the trip, the Taj management sent Abbey and
saxophonist Art Lanier back to New York to pick up the latest music.

Abbey?s outfit was replaced by the Symphonians, fronted by the cornet
player Cricket Smith. Smith had been featured on the seminal recordings
made by James Reese Europe?s Society Orchestra in 1913 and 1914,
capturing
jazz at the moment of its transition from the relatively unsophisticated

ragtime style. Smith ?signed his contract for a fixed amount of money
and
two Coronas a day, so every day, the manager would have to bring him his

cigars?, recalls Luis Moreno, a Spanish trumpet player who lived in
Bombay
for 20 years. ?He was a character.?

In 1938, pianist Teddy Weatherford, who had played with Louis Armstrong,

took the stage with his men. His swinging style and treble voicing had
been
an important influence on jazz during its formative years. The Taj, it
would seem, wasn?t quite the genteel venue it now is not at least from

the way Weatherford?s occasional Russian bassist named ?Innocent Nick?
described the gigs to the jazz magazine Storyville. ?Teddy used to play
downstairs, in the Tavern of the Taj, for the soldiers, sailors and
others,
a very rough place,? Nick said. ?Teddy would play for hours without a
break. Even with drinks, he would continue one-handed. He had tremendous

hands.?

For the African-American musicians, Bombay provided refuge from the
apartheid in the U.S. Men like Weatherford and his sidemen, such as the
saxophonist Roy Butler, spent long years shuttling between Europe and
the
subcontinent, where racial barriers seemed non-existent, at least for
them.
Butler?s years in India as a Weatherford sideman, he told Storyville,
were
among his happiest the work was relatively easy, the pay and conditions

good, he was treated splendidly by both management and clientele, and
enjoyed the luxurious life under the British Raj. The Taj management, on

its part, honoured Weatherford by naming a dish after him: Poires Glace
Weatherford. (The absence of colour prejudice was only to be expected.
After all, industrial baron Jamshetji Tata was moved to build the Taj
after
being prevented one leisurely Bombay evening from dining at the
Europeans-only Pyrke?s Apollo Hotel. Later, he famously hung a notice in

the Taj forbidding entry to South Africans and dogs.)

Weatherford?s sidemen were an eclectic lot and opened Bombay?s ears to a

wealth of new sounds, the Cuban drumming of Luis Pedroso and the Spanish

brass of Luis Moreno, among them. Butler, who was known as the Reverend
in
acknowledgement of his abstemious ways, helped Weatherford drill the
band.
Moreno characterised Butler as the ?gentleman of the orchestra?. Moreno
added, ?He never drank in his life and if someone said, ?How about a
round
of drink?? Roy would say, ?I?ll have an ice-cream. You enjoy beer, I
enjoy
ice-cream.? Butler went on to lead his own band at Greens, located where

the Taj Intercontinental now stands.

Both Weatherford (who married an Anglo-Indian woman, before dying of
cholera in Calcutta in 1945, aged 41) and Butler recruited Goan sidemen,

plugging Bombay into the source of jazz. The trumpet player Frank
Fernand,
who played in Weatherford band with his Goan compatriots, Micky Correa
and
Josique Menzies, says that his stint with the American taught him to
?play
like a negro?. Moreno helped Fernand develop the ability to hit long,
high
notes, eventually extending his range up to E flat. Butler, it must be
noted, was less than thrilled with his Goan employees. ?My short stretch
as
a bandleader in India was not too earth-shaking,? he told Storyville.
?The
local musicians were not too familiar with jazz at that time. I
understood
that there are some very good jazzmen out there now, but the time was
too
short for anything to develop, good or bad.? For their part, some of the

Goan musicians weren?t overly impressed with Butler, either. They
believed
his decision to stay in India was motivated by the fear that he wouldn?t

find work in the US. As Fernand put it, ?The faltu fellows stayed, the
good
ones went home.?





----
Continued in Part 2
----





This article in Word format was sent to me, on request, by the Editor of

MansWorld Magazine, N.Radhakrishnan, thus saving me the trouble of
typing
it out. Please reciprocate his good gesture by visiting the site
http://www.mansworldindia.com


Cheers!

Cecil


====



########################################################################
##
# Send submissions for Goanet to goanet at goanet.org
#
# PLEASE remember to stay on-topic (related to Goa), and avoid top-posts
#
# More details on Goanet at http://joingoanet.shorturl.com/
#
# Please keep your discussion/tone polite, to reflect respect to others
#
########################################################################
##

------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor ---------------------~-->
Low on Ink? Get 80% off inkjet cartridges & Free Shipping at
77Colors.com.
We have your brand: HP, Epson, Lexmark, Canon, Compaq and more!
http://www.c1tracking.com/l.asp?cid=5981
http://us.click.yahoo.com/DmnqpB/IyhGAA/ySSFAA/8XQrlB/TM
---------------------------------------------------------------------~->

To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
aldona-net-unsubscribe at yahoogroups.com



Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
Bernado Colaco
2003-08-10 03:49:37 UTC
Permalink
I wonder when Jazz music coming from capitalism was a
part of Goan culture? Ok, Sodam chintalim vehtelem
munon.... was a class act!

Cola?o
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
Hi all,
Great articles on the Goan culture in Bombay in the
1950-1970 and
beyond.
I do wish Bernard Colaco of ?UK / ?Macau and
Constantino Xavier of
Portugal will read these articles and know about
Goan culture and the
artists in the Bombay / Mumbai Diaspora. Regards, GL
===
__________________________________________________
Yahoo! Plus - For a better Internet experience
http://uk.promotions.yahoo.com/yplus/yoffer.html
Gabe Menezes
2003-08-10 17:22:05 UTC
Permalink
Sent: Saturday, August 09, 2003 10:44 AM
Subject: [Goanet]Chris & Lorna (Part 1) - by Naresh Fernandes - MansWorld
magazine July 2003


Love and longing in Mumbai's Jazz Age (Part 1 of 3 Parts)
by Naresh Fernandes - MansWorld magazine July 2003


RESPONSE:

A fantastically written article which not only sheds light on Chris Perry's
and Lorna's story but which also tells us about Bombay's famous jazz of
years gone by. To boot, it gives a history lesson on the migration of Goans
to Bombay and their occupations.

My father was born in Chadan Waddi (Dhobi Thalao). It was from here that he
emigrated as a young man to Nairobi, Kenya. The story goes that he was
always reminiscing about Bombay, so much so that he got given the nick name
Bomboikar. He is dead and gone now. If any one want to know my back ground
from Kenya I only have to tell them that I am Bomboikar's son and
immediately they know where I come from !

Cheers,

Gabe
Bernado Colaco
2003-08-11 12:01:11 UTC
Permalink
Since Goa is a potpouri of cultures let us now accept
capitalistic Jazz as a part of our culture (Thanks to
Goans in Mumbai). I hope this will solve the name
calling issue.:))

--- "Frederick Noronha (FN)" <fred at bytesforall.org>
wrote: > On Sun, 10 Aug 2003, [iso-8859-1] Bernado
Colaco
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
Post by Bernado Colaco
I wonder when Jazz music coming from capitalism
was a
Post by Bernado Colaco
part of Goan culture? Ok, Sodam chintalim vehtelem
munon.... was a class act!
Cola?o
--- Gilbert Lawrence <gilbertlaw at adelphia.net>
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
Hi all,
Great articles on the Goan culture in Bombay in
the
Post by Bernado Colaco
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
1950-1970 and
beyond.
I do wish Bernard Colaco of ?UK / ?Macau and
Constantino Xavier of
Portugal will read these articles and know about
Goan culture and the
artists in the Bombay / Mumbai Diaspora.
Regards, GL
Bernado at his usual xenophobic self. (Even if he
hasn't explained his
real identity, and why he claims to be based in
London while getting his
posts put out via Macau. Neither his claims to know
what pre-1961 Goan
really was, while later claiming he was born
post-1961.)
*What* is Goan culture? What is the culture of Goans
today? Is it
something frozen in time? Is it something restricted
to only one
language? (Prof Peter Nazareth comments that Goans
write in 13
languages.)
If he follow Bernado's twisted logic of "cultural
purity" we could next
be arguing that man originated in Goa...
Or is it something that today encompasses various
continents, various
languages, and the influences that have come to set
on this tiny place on
planet earth?
To one's mind, Goa is a melting pot (of various
people, coming in at
different points of time, and various rulers or
immigrants or invaders,
who have shaped the region into being what it is).
We are a fruit salad
of sorts, and there's nothing wrong with that. Over
the centuries,
different groups have been negotiating cultural and
physical space with
each other, sometimes peacefully and sometimes
violently.
As much as we claim to have wrong done to ourselves,
if we dig deep enough
we'd find that our own groups have wronged others in
the past.
The earlier we acknowledge this reality the better.
To argue that Jazz cannot have anything to do with
Goa is a few steps away
from saying that the Mando cannot be really Goan,
since it was first sung
only sometime around the nineteenth century and, in
any case, has a range
of global influences ranging from the Portuguese and
the European to the
Far East Asian costumes the women-singers wore. Or,
it is close to an
argument that chief minister Parrikar recently
repeated, that English
*cannot* be a legit language in Goa because of its
foreign origins.
All stem from a similar set of insecurities, and a
desire to dominate by
defining things in a way convenient to oneself.
FN
__________________________________________________
Yahoo! Plus - For a better Internet experience
http://uk.promotions.yahoo.com/yplus/yoffer.html
Eugene Correia
2003-08-11 14:38:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gabe Menezes
A fantastically written article which not only sheds
light on Chris Perry's
and Lorna's story but which also tells us about
Bombay's famous jazz of
years gone by. To boot, it gives a history lesson on
the migration of Goans
to Bombay and their occupations.
Cheers,
Gabe
Naresh's piece is good reading at least for many who
were not aware of the role of Goans in Mumbai's music
world.
But Naresh's saying that people said Chris left his
wife and family for Lorna isn't true. That Chris
wouldn't abandon his wife and family was one of the
issues in Chris and Lorna's relationship.
Chris was domineering, to say the least. He
"controlled" Lorna and, according to some, he made a
contract with Lorna that will never sing for anyone
except him.
Even after their break-up he tried his best to prevent
her from singing for bands and in films. He and his
brothers and friends would create trouble for bands
who engaged Lorna to sign for weddings and parties.
Chris was a "dada" in the Goan music world. He and his
brother Paul were "toughies" and none dared to mess
with them.
I often saw Chris and Lorna arguing near Lorna's home
late at nights. I would nod a hello and proceed or
sometimes ignore them. They, along with other
Dhobitalao musicians, eat at a roadside stall.
They would come walking across Cross Maidan where a
new restaurant had opened (forget name), long after
their Venice days.
At my meetings with Orlando and others, we often
discussed Goan musicians. Many of those names Naresh
has mentioned came up.
I knew some of them or saw some of them in action. I
had once a long talk with Frank Fernand on the
contribution of Goans to Hindi film music. Maybe,
Naresh's third part will have more names such as
Sebastian Fernandes, whose son lives in Toronto. He
was one of the greatest "arranger" in Hindi film
industry.
Need to hear of another jazz great, Braz Gonsalves.
Still a big name in the jazz world. Made an
unsuccessful stint in Toronto where he migrated. He
returned back. I believe Braz's wife, Yvonne, a singer
in her own right, is one of Chic Chocolate's daughter
(nee verification).
Braz's daughter is an accomplished singer. She didn't
migrate as her boyfriend and she were in a band
playign at the Taj.
We had long talks during his brief stay in Toronto,
and earlier when he and Chris came for the First Int'l
Goan Convention in 1988. Both together were great, and
the recording of their show on casette is a treasure.
I am not sure if copies are still available.
After my dad retired from Indian Navy (civilian), he
played in the Hindi film music. During his Navy days
he played occasionally for the Bombay Orchestra, and
often at the Grand Hotel (Ballard Estate) for D'Mello
and his quartet, which played chamber music.
He would tell me many stories of fine musicians of his
time and before him. Wish I had made notes of it.
Someone asked how Naresh may have sourced it. One of
his best sources could be Dr. Thereza Albuquerque. Her
book, The Catholics of Bombay, deals with musicians
and many of the names are mentioned there. If anyone
has a chance to read it, please do so.
Besides, Ronnie Monserrate is another source. But
Ronnie was young to know many things and most of the
tales have been passed his father's generation to his
own.
He quoted Anglo-Lusitanian, a fine paper. Another good
source is perhaps Goan World, and copies of it are
lying with the Heras Institute at St. Xavier's in
Mumbai.
Naresh is young (perhaps in his mid30s), and I met him
when he was in New York working for the Wall Street
Journal. When I learnt he was leaving WSJ to go back
to the Times of India as news editor or deputy news
editor, I sent him an email asking why he was leaving
a good job.
His reply that the US doesn't interest him, and he
needs to do journalism where he could be a
contributing force.
Gilbert Lawrence
2003-08-12 00:27:23 UTC
Permalink
Please disregard the prior post. OR the subject need to be changed to
"Vishy Washy's stand on Rape".

Response:
This is the strangest apologetic response I have ever read. Is the
following what you will tell the girl you just raped? Is this what you
will tell her parents and brothers and elders and the law?

Here is another suggestion. Go over the post you made on "Rape" with
your Mother and your father. Perhaps they will enlighten you - better
late than never!!!.

I do not feel like sending you my regards. GL

-----------------------------------------
You guys are turning out Vishwanath into Pepsi and Coca-cola. Things are
blown out of proportion.

Regards
Vishwanath

----------------

Well said Gilbert!

Remember now, these are the people who are the public faces of the Right
Wing Hindutva movement ( just as wicked as the Rt Wing Nuts among
Muslims and alleged Christians ).

I would have excused this vile comment from Mr. Shirwaikar if

1. He made a slip
2. He was being glib or
3. He was not conversant in the English language
Gilbert Lawrence
2003-08-12 01:03:23 UTC
Permalink
Eugene Correia writes:
Naresh's piece is good reading at least for many who were not aware of
the role of Goans in Mumbai's music world.

Comment:
Great and informative piece by Naresh Fernandes. This was a very well
researched article. From the responses, the Bombay Goans were very
nostalgic. And those Goans, who left Goa and Bombay bypassing all this
culture, got a lesson on Goan culture in Bombay.

One of the reasons why Goan culture in Bombay flourished and prospered-
perhaps more than in Goa was because of the market place. In Bombay
there were the financial resources of the listeners and the clientele
who appreciated that music and dance. Most of the clientele for these
Goan Musical Greats were rich Bombaywallas who frequented the night
clubs, other club houses, ritzy eating establishments and Bollywood.

But before the Goans became Greats in Bombay and in Naresh Fernandes'
article, the 'not so rich' Goans supported and nourished the Goan
artists. Here may be a learning lesson for the current Goan Diasporas.
But before we get to that, the breeding ground for young musically
inclined Goan boys to develop and polish their act were the Goan
functions - weddings and dances (through out the year and specially
Christmas and New Year season) hosted by the Catholic Gymkhana, Byculla
Mechanics, the Bandra gymkhana etc.

The foremost to stimulate the spirit of competition and excellence were
the "Teens and Tunes" musical and dance competitions. The article did
not mention about this institution and whether it still exists. Perhaps
some GoaNetters form Bombay may enlighten us on this. In the seventies,
we had the high school and college 4-5 member band groups with names
like: five stars, Caravels, Drifters, Gay Dukes, Gemini four to name a
few, among many others that vied for the annual top three spots in the
young Goan music world. These young boys were basically home grown
without fancy/expensive equipment that struggled and were motivated to
learn and master the art. There were no school or college music
departments as we have in the USA.

In the Goan Diaspora, with all the support system in the schools and in
the home, we have not been able to stimulate many young Goan boys and
girls into music. And those that made it did so on their own without
much Goan community support. The only time the Goan community
appreciated these artists was after the world at large gave them
accolades and recognized their talent. Perhaps Toronto has some Goan
young music groups. But to the best of my knowledge New York City and
Chicago do not have any. How can the community nurture that talent?
Every Indian function I attend has performances by 7-15 year-old boys
and girls on Indian music and dance and that is great.

This is a call to action by the Goan community in the Diaspora!!!
Gilbert Lawrence
2003-08-12 03:44:11 UTC
Permalink
Hi Helga,
I thank you for your correction. The point I was making, the artists
cannot live on their art and neither they nor their art can thrive if
there are no paying customers or clientele (when they are alive). Or
else they will be like Van Gough etc. It is for the community to
support them and appreciate their work during their life time as well as
in their formative years.

You will have to admit while there were some "pobre fidalgos" in Goa,
the vast majority of "pre-1961" Goans could not afford the luxury of
art. Furthermore some "empregados" who lived in the "big city" of Panjim
and Margao had electricity and transportation to go to attend cultural
functions. In small village "pre-1961", there was just the church music
and weddings where the same old music and Konkani Cantaram and mandos
were played and sung. The only musician of repute in a village what the
choir master. Or was I living in a different part of Goa than you?

Gilbert.

----------
Gilbert, perhaps you meant that JAZZ flourished in Bombay more than in
Goa
because Goan culture has always flourished in Goa! Our mandos and our
tiatros will never die. Jazz was popular with the well heeled
'Bombaywallas'
probably because they were exposed to music in English whereas in Goa
Konkani and Portuguese music was more appreciated.
The article by Naresh Ferandes was excellent - he have us a glimpse
into a
Bombay we had not imagined. I chanced upon another of his articles TOMB
RAIDER -Looking for St. Francis Xavier which can be found at
http://www.transitionmagazine.com/online/tombraider.htm
Its hilarious and I think everyone will enjoy it. There is a verse or a
poem
by Eunice de Souza which could have been my old aunt speaking!
---Helga
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
One of the reasons why Goan culture in Bombay flourished and
prospered-
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
perhaps more than in Goa was because of the market place.
########################################################################
##
# Send submissions for Goanet to goanet at goanet.org
#
# PLEASE remember to stay on-topic (related to Goa), and avoid top-posts
#
# More details on Goanet at http://joingoanet.shorturl.com/
#
# Please keep your discussion/tone polite, to reflect respect to others
#
########################################################################
##
Thomas Albrecht
2003-08-12 11:21:44 UTC
Permalink
Hello

Is somebody there, who can tell me, if it is possible to go by ship from
mumbai to Goa or back in the upcoming winter season? And is there a link/url
for that?

One more question I would have:

I was invited a few years ago by the son of Dr Monteiro (whom I did knew
too in 1972!) in Candolim to book at his place, when I will came to Goa. But
I lost the adress. As I will be in Goa at Xmas - I would ask, if anybody
knows his internet/e-mail adress

Thank you so much

Thomas Albrecht
Germany




##########################################################################
# Send submissions for Goanet to goanet at goanet.org #

# PLEASE remember to stay on-topic (related to Goa), and avoid top-posts #
# More details on Goanet at http://joingoanet.shorturl.com/ #
# Please keep your discussion/tone polite, to reflect respect to others #
##########################################################################
Eugene Correia
2003-08-13 02:20:18 UTC
Permalink
The classic jazz may not have been heard in Goa before
1961. Pieces such as Helga mentioned -- Satchmo's What
a Wonderful World -- was played by the 'swing bands'.
Jazz didn't bloom in Bombay till the late 60s. Prior
to the 60s, there was a mixture of jazz and "big band"
music. Chris Perry was influenced by Miles Davis and
he named one of his sons after the jazz legend. Chris
also tried to imitate the sounds of Louis Armstrong,
especially Hello Dolly.
But classic jazz, of the New Orleans type, was
confined to places like Venic and Gaylord.
I covered the first Jazz Yatra in 1978 at the Rang
Bhavan. It was a great experience listening to Sonny
Rollins.
I also enjoyed Japan's Sadao Watanabe Quintet, who
played some swing.
The Indian group included Louis Banks and Braz
Gonsalves. Rudy Cotton was also there.
Niranjan Jhaveri organized the Jazz Yatra, and I
believe he still does it.

Eugene Correia

__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software
http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com
Gilbert Lawrence
2003-08-13 04:15:19 UTC
Permalink
Hi Helga,

Thanks for your polite response and for clarifying the culture /music
scene in Goa. You are right that we wrongly compare and get defensive.
We need to compare and look for any learning lessons / opportunities to
improve.

In my post I was not talking about jazz in Goa and not even Jazz in
Bombay. I am an authority on neither. My taste (and I know little about
it) is just good-old dance music.

I was not talking about the music /art greats in Bombay, Goa or NY. I
was talking about how to get there (to the top). And what can the Goan
community do to help our youth to get there and in the process enrich
Goan culture for the masses. Does Goa (and Bombay) currently have any
music (solo and band) and singing competitions (like 'Teens and Tunes')
in the various villages and talukas - - Not at the state level for the
'Greats'?

Regards, Gilbert.

----------------------------------------------------------------
Hi Gilbert!
I wasnt correcting you just clarifying!
Yes patronage of the arts or the lack of it is a very old problem - even
older than Van Gogh and artists who have been encouraged by kings and
wealthy men and women should consider themselves lucky for there are
many
who have not. In India we have not laid great emphasis on the Arts in
the
schools either.But even with all this apathy we still produced Emiliano
Cruz, Remo Fernandes and so many talented tiatristas!
But comparing Goa and Bombay as many people tend to do doesnt really
make
sense - Goa was and still is a very small place that charms everyone
while
Bombay is a metropolis with money. So its understandable that musicians
gravitated to it then and now - wasn't that what the Big Apple was all
about? I heard that all the great jazz and blues singers said that you
hadn't made it until you had plucked the Big Apple which was New York. I
could be wrong about the origin of term but not about the importance of
making it big in NY.
I cant really comment on what pre- 1961 Goa was like - mine are just
stories
woven by my mother and her family for the entertainment of my sister
and I.
And I do not know what the 'pobre fidalgos' were doing either -
probably
living their lives of 'pobreza' and 'fidalguice'! Well if they were
'pobres'
then that counts them out as patrons of music. As far as I know the
'ricos'
were using their money to built elaborate mansions stuffed with
chandeliers
and Macao chinaware. Which reminds me that everyone has got to read
Naresh's
other article - its about Macao and its very funny!
--Helga



----- Original Message -----
From: "Gilbert Lawrence" <gilbertlaw at adelphia.net>
To: <goanet at goanet.org>
Sent: Monday, August 11, 2003 11:44 PM
Subject: RE: [Goanet]Another article by Naresh Fernandes
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
Hi Helga,
I thank you for your correction. The point I was making, the artists
cannot live on their art and neither they nor their art can thrive if
there are no paying customers or clientele (when they are alive). Or
else they will be like Van Gough etc. It is for the community to
support them and appreciate their work during their life time as well
as
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
in their formative years.
You will have to admit while there were some "pobre fidalgos" in Goa,
the vast majority of "pre-1961" Goans could not afford the luxury of
art. Furthermore some "empregados" who lived in the "big city" of
Panjim
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
and Margao had electricity and transportation to go to attend cultural
functions. In small village "pre-1961", there was just the church
music
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
and weddings where the same old music and Konkani Cantaram and mandos
were played and sung. The only musician of repute in a village what
the
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
choir master. Or was I living in a different part of Goa than you?
########################################################################
##
# Send submissions for Goanet to goanet at goanet.org
#
# PLEASE remember to stay on-topic (related to Goa), and avoid top-posts
#
# More details on Goanet at http://joingoanet.shorturl.com/
#
# Please keep your discussion/tone polite, to reflect respect to others
#
########################################################################
##
gilbert
2003-08-13 04:26:50 UTC
Permalink
--- In Goanet2003 at yahoogroups.com, "Frederick Noronha (FN)"
Post by Frederick Noronha (FN)
A hovercraft that was launched on this route sometime in the
'nineties
Post by Frederick Noronha (FN)
could not be sustained due to choppy seas, missed trips and the
fact that
Post by Frederick Noronha (FN)
the costly (made-in-Europe) hovercraft were quite close to the then
plane-fares.
-------------------------------------------------------
Fred,
it wasnt a hovercraft, which rides on a cushion of air, with no
underwater drag, but a catamaran, whose underwater dynamic shape
produces lift and reduces drag, thus increasing its speed, unlike a
conventional hull. An hovercraft can beach on hard land, while a
catamaran requires a jetty for passengers to disembark.
regards, Gilbert.
James Almeida
2003-08-13 11:14:37 UTC
Permalink
From: "Eddie Fernandes" <eddie at fernandes.u-net.com>
Reply-To: goanet at goanet.org
To: <goanet at goanet.org>
Subject: Re: [Goanet]Ship from mumbai to goa?
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2003 08:15:44 +0100
Headline: Indian cruise liners to tap foreign and upmarket desi tourists
Source: Economic Times of India, 3 Aug. 2003 at
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/cms.dll/html/uncomp/articleshow?msid=110306
BANGALORE: The Ministry of Shipping plans to start a domestic "cruise
shipping" service along the west coast on the lines of "Palace on Wheels"
to
cater to foreign and upmarket domestic tourists.
"We want to start domestic cruise shipping, something on the pattern of
Palace on Wheels," Union Minister for Shipping Shatrughan Sinha told PTI
here.
I'm just curious whether the government has any competences to enter and
compete in the cruise ship business. I am positive that "Shotgun" Sinha
does not! :-) This would be a utter wastage of the taxpayer monies.
Would it not be better to leave these initiatives to the private sector?

Best,
James

_________________________________________________________________
STOP MORE SPAM with the new MSN 8 and get 2 months FREE*
http://join.msn.com/?page=features/junkmail
gilbert
2003-08-13 14:45:09 UTC
Permalink
--- In Goanet2003 at yahoogroups.com, "James Almeida" <goanet at g...>
Post by James Almeida
I'm just curious whether the government has any competences to
enter and
Post by James Almeida
compete in the cruise ship business. I am positive that "Shotgun"
Sinha
Post by James Almeida
does not! :-) This would be a utter wastage of the taxpayer
monies.
Post by James Almeida
Would it not be better to leave these initiatives to the private
sector?
Post by James Almeida
Best,
James
------------------------------------------------
You're dead right about the lack of competence because it has been
proven for the nth time that whatever the govt. runs in the travel
and hospitality industry is loss making. In the case of palace on
wheels, the losses are huge because the pricing is too steep, and the
biggest users are govt. bureaucrats taking a free ride with their
families. Even take the case of Goa where the govt. runs hotels in
margao, panjim, mapuca, colva and calangute-all loss making, and
still the govt. has only recently sunk a huge amount of money in
renovating them.Why, you may ask? Simple- rooms are subsidised for
Govt employees, and politicians! The corruption which continues is
mind boggling. The socialist lessons of the soviet union are
difficult to give up, believe me.
regards, Gilbert.
Cecil Pinto
2003-08-09 09:44:31 UTC
Permalink
Love and longing in Mumbai?s Jazz Age (Part 1 of 3 Parts)
by Naresh Fernandes - MansWorld magazine July 2003



For over five decades, well into the late 1960s before prohibition,
taxation and rock-and-roll killed it, Mumbai boasted of one of the most
vibrant jazz scenes in the world, outside of the US. On Churchgate Street,
stretching from the Marine Drive sea front all the way up to Flora
Fountain the sound of jazz spilled out through the doors of packed night
clubs like Ambassador, Napoli, The Talk of the Town, Gaylord?s, Ritz,
Little Hut, Bistro and Volga. Not to speak of the Rendezvous at the Taj.
The legendary pianist and composer Dave Brubeck was impressed enough by the
local musicians to attempt to make some recordings during one of his
visits. Set against this backdrop is the tragic love affair of tenor
saxophonist and band leader Chris Perry and singer Lorna Cordeiro. Naresh
Fernandes tells their story for the first time.


---------


Their eyes give it away. Chris Perry wears a slick black jacket, the
sleeves of his crisp white shirt revealing the glint of dark cuff links.
His fingers clasp a gleaming tenor saxophone with a lover?s
gentleness. Arms crossed coquettishly above her waist, Lorna Cordeiro is
chic in a bouffant and a form-fitting gown that shows a flash of ankle.
They stare into each other?s eyes, mesmerised. Behind them looms a giant
camera aperture borrowed from the opening sequence of the Bond films.

You couldn?t miss the poster as you sauntered down Jamshetji Tata Road in
downtown Bombay. It hung outside the Astoria Hotel, across the street from
the octagonal Art Deco turret of Eros cinema, inviting the city to Chris
and Lorna?s daily shows at the Venice nightclub. It was 1971. India was
savouring its newfound place on the world?s stage. The country?s armed
forces had decisively liberated Bangladesh and the idealism of Independence
had welled up again. India?s middle classes were capturing their polyester
memories on Agfa Click IIIs that cost 46.50 rupees (taxes extra), aspiring
to the lifestyles of ?The Jet Set Air Hostesses? described in The
Illustrated Weekly of India (price: 85 paise), and being encouraged by
newspaper ads to ?Go gay with Gaylord fine filter cigarettes?.

As the City of Gold bubbled through its jazz age, Lorna and Chris
enthralled Bombay with their shows at Venice each night. Remo Fernandes,
who would go on to become the first Indian pop musician to record an album
of original English-language tunes, was among those locked in the spell.
?Two artists sometimes ignite a creative chemistry in each other which goes
beyond all logical explanation. Mere mortals can only look and listen in
awe,? he rhapsodised. ?In such duos, one plus one does not make two. It
makes a number so immeasurable, it defies all laws of calculus.?

But the sparks that flew at Venice gradually built into a roaring
conflagration. As Remo put it: ?Hyper-intense, high-temperament artistic
relationships often end in emotional disaster, like two comets when they
steer too dangerously close. Chris?s and Lorna?s, as we all know, was no
exception.?

Like the myths about the city in which they soared to fame, the tale of
Chris and Lorna has gained so much in the re-telling it?s sometimes
difficult to thresh the apocrypha from the actual. Thirty years after the
two stopped performing together, old-time musicians in the bylanes of Dhobi
Talao and Bandra still beg anonymity as they reminisce in sad whispers.

?He was shameless. He left his wife and three small children for that girl.?

?Chris and Lorna were in love. When they fought, they became mortal
enemies. He destroyed her and he destroyed himself.?

?She was very good singer. Beyond that, she was nothing. She got her break
with Chris Perry. He made contract with her. She couldn?t sing without his
permission. She had no brains, so she signed. Then he went back to his wife.?

?He didn?t let her perform with anyone else. He threatened to break the
legs of one Hindu fellow who tried to get her to sing with him.?

?She hit the bottle, men. She became an alcoholic and just disappeared.?

Chris Perry who was born Pereira died on January 25, 2002, his last years
hobbled by Parkinson?s disease. Lorna has refused to recount her version of
events for publication. But the fidelity of her contralto booming out of
our speakers, embroidered with Chris?s perfectly crafted sax filigrees,
speaks its own truth.


Ronnie Monserrate was 19 when he began to play Sunday gigs at Venice with
the Chris Perry band, sitting in for the regular pianist. Venice had a
reputation. It was the jazzman?s jazz haunt, the rendezvous for musicians
from around the country and occasionally from around the world. Dave
Brubeck swung by when he visited Bombay in 1958, as Duke Ellington had when
his band set out on their famous world tour of 1963. As Ronnie tells it,
the dapper Chris Perry was the musician?s musician: ?He had perfect pitch.
He was an arranger, a composer, a player.? Chris played both trumpet and
saxophone, sometimes switching from one to the other mid-tune, a feat that
required elaborate lip control. His trumpet tone was broad and true. He
didn?t have flashy technique, but the notes he coaxed out of his horn had a
mellowness that kept the fans coming back night after night.

Chris was 43 at the time, Lorna was 25. No one seems quite sure exactly how
they met, but everyone?s agreed that he groomed her into one of the
Bombay?s finest crooners. One version maintains that Lorna got her break
when still in school, after she won the Connie Francis soundalike
competition at Metro cinema. This prompted a musician named Raymond
Albuqerque to invite her to sing in his show at the Bandra Fair. Her
rendition of Underneath the Mango Tree got the crowds so fired up that
Chris Perry, already an established performer, went to her home to audition
her. She was just 16 when she joined Perry?s band.

A vocalist in the Shirley Bassey mould, Lorna belted out every tune like it
was her last time on stage. ?She had a lot of black feel,? is how Ronnie
describes her performances. ?You could see the intensity when she was on
stage. She?d give it her best, every time. She was like a magnet. You
couldn?t help but be attracted to her when she was on stage. And with Chris
Perry band by her side, it was like magic happening. There was incredible
attraction. There was a lot of love in the interaction. It was apparent in
their body language. They brought out the best in each other. They?d look
into each other?s eyes and their understanding was so great that there?d be
spontaneous combustion.?

Offstage, though, things could get awkward. Any man attempting to talk to
Lorna was liable to get a taste of Perry?s famously volatile fists. During
breaks, the musicians would sit around their table, absolutely silent.
?They were jolly people but they were afraid to laugh around Chris,? Ronnie
says. Ronnie was the only exception, perhaps because his youth made him
seem unthreatening. Two decades later, he?d find opportunity to call in
that bond of trust.

Venice was around the corner from Bombay?s swinging jazz strip, Churchgate
Street (now Veer Nariman Road). Pianists, trios and quartets were to be
heard all the way down the 200-metre thoroughfare as it led off from
Churchgate station to the Arabian Sea. First came Berry?s, with tandoori
butter chicken that was the stuff of Bombay legend and accomplished
piano-fronted groups led by Dorothy Jones and Stanley Pinto. Across the
fence was Bombelli?s, named after its Swiss owner, where a trio held sway
as ad men sipped cappuccinos. Then came the Ambassador, where Toni Pinto?s
quintet encapsulated Bombay?s diversity: the group had two Jews a singer
named Ephrim Elias and drummer Abie Cohen, an Anglo-Indian tenor
saxophonist named Norman Mobsby, and, in addition to Pinto, another Goan,
the bassist Clement Furtado.

Pinto?s kingdom was named the Other Room, so called because after the rich
and famous had finished drinking at the bar, they?d say, ?Let?s go to the
other room.? He ruled for 16 years from 1958, his sharply dressed group
spinning out hard-driving bop and light classics, and playing back-up for
cabarets and visiting acrobats, magicians and flamenco dancers. The
Ambassador was owned by the cigar-chomping Jack Voyantzis, an ebullient
Greek who was assisted by his brother, Socrates. The siblings had started
their subcontinental journey in Rangoon, opened a caf? in Delhi, and
finally found their way to Bombay, where they transformed a hotel known as
the Argentinian into the Ambassador. The cream of Bombay society turned out
to catch Toni?s tightly-rehearsed band. Toni remembers once looking up from
his piano to see three of the city?s leading editors appreciatively tapping
their feet: Rusi Karanjia, editor of the left-wing tabloid Blitz, D F
Karaka, editor of the rival Current, and Frank Moraes, editor of the Indian
Express, with his American girlfriend. Another time, as the band was going
through its routine, Toni realised that someone from the back of the room
was playing along on a trumpet. It turned out to be American hornman Eddie
Calvert. ?He came for dinner one night even though he was staying at the
Ritz,? Toni says, and he asked his drummer, Bobby Hadrian, to go back and
get his instrument. Calvert and Toni?s band jammed for an hour, playing
the tunes the American had made famous: Cherry Pink, Begin the Beguine,
Wonderland by Night.

Elsewhere on Churchgate Street, music spilled out through the doors of the
Napoli, The Talk of the Town and Gaylord?s. Opposite Venice, there was jazz
at the Ritz, while at the Little Hut, Neville Thomas led a group calling
itself Three Guys and a Doll. Past Flora Fountain stood Bistro and Volga,
home to a quartet led by the grandfatherly baritone saxophonist Hecke
Kingdom.

Dave Brubeck was impressed enough by the local musicians to attempt to make
some recordings with them during his visit. But Bombay defeated him. He
later recounted the episode to an interviewer: ?The current fluctuated in
Bombay in those days and so the tape would speed up and slow down. Like,
when you were shaving, the speed of the motor would go up and down. It
ruined one of my favourite tapes I've ever made.? Another visiting jazzman,
the pianist Hampton Hawes, was overwhelmed by problems that were rather
more basic. ?Bombay turned me around,? he wrote. ?I?d never seen poverty
before.? Art, he decided, was irrelevant amidst the gnawing deprivation.
?Here I was thinking about making a big splash, a hit record, going home a
hero, and I?m walking the streets with motherfuckers who don?t even know
what a piece of bread is, let along Stravinsky or Charlie Parker. If Bird
was alive and played for them they wouldn?t be able to hear him because
they?d be too damn hungry.?

Admittedly, jazz had always been the preserve of Bombay?s elite. But while
the audiences were upper crust, the musicians who cooked up the syncopated
rhythms were not. Like Toni Pinto, Ronnie Monserrate, Chris and Lorna, the
majority were Roman Catholics strivers from the former Portuguese colony of
Goa, 550 kilometres south of Bombay. They?d been an important part of the
Bombay music scene since the 1920s, when Bombay began to develop its
appetite for what was then called ?hot music?. Jazz had made its way from
New Orleans in the waxy grooves of phonograph records and travelled over
the oceans with touring American bands that played for the administrators
of the Raj. Bombay?s first jazz concerts were performed at the Bandstand,
south of the Oval. Among the earliest jazzmen to play an extended stint in
Bombay was Leon Abbey, a violinist from Minnesota, who led an eight-piece
band at the Taj during the 1935-?36 season. Abbey wore white tails on stage
and played the freshest sounds. He told one interviewer, ?I kept up with
the latest numbers because someone would always come up to the bandstand
and say, ?Old Bean, would you play so and so
?, because as far as he was
concerned, we should know how to play everything that had ever been
written.? Midway through the trip, the Taj management sent Abbey and
saxophonist Art Lanier back to New York to pick up the latest music.

Abbey?s outfit was replaced by the Symphonians, fronted by the cornet
player Cricket Smith. Smith had been featured on the seminal recordings
made by James Reese Europe?s Society Orchestra in 1913 and 1914, capturing
jazz at the moment of its transition from the relatively unsophisticated
ragtime style. Smith ?signed his contract for a fixed amount of money and
two Coronas a day, so every day, the manager would have to bring him his
cigars?, recalls Luis Moreno, a Spanish trumpet player who lived in Bombay
for 20 years. ?He was a character.?

In 1938, pianist Teddy Weatherford, who had played with Louis Armstrong,
took the stage with his men. His swinging style and treble voicing had been
an important influence on jazz during its formative years. The Taj, it
would seem, wasn?t quite the genteel venue it now is not at least from
the way Weatherford?s occasional Russian bassist named ?Innocent Nick?
described the gigs to the jazz magazine Storyville. ?Teddy used to play
downstairs, in the Tavern of the Taj, for the soldiers, sailors and others,
a very rough place,? Nick said. ?Teddy would play for hours without a
break. Even with drinks, he would continue one-handed. He had tremendous
hands.?

For the African-American musicians, Bombay provided refuge from the
apartheid in the U.S. Men like Weatherford and his sidemen, such as the
saxophonist Roy Butler, spent long years shuttling between Europe and the
subcontinent, where racial barriers seemed non-existent, at least for them.
Butler?s years in India as a Weatherford sideman, he told Storyville, were
among his happiest the work was relatively easy, the pay and conditions
good, he was treated splendidly by both management and clientele, and
enjoyed the luxurious life under the British Raj. The Taj management, on
its part, honoured Weatherford by naming a dish after him: Poires Glace
Weatherford. (The absence of colour prejudice was only to be expected.
After all, industrial baron Jamshetji Tata was moved to build the Taj after
being prevented one leisurely Bombay evening from dining at the
Europeans-only Pyrke?s Apollo Hotel. Later, he famously hung a notice in
the Taj forbidding entry to South Africans and dogs.)

Weatherford?s sidemen were an eclectic lot and opened Bombay?s ears to a
wealth of new sounds, the Cuban drumming of Luis Pedroso and the Spanish
brass of Luis Moreno, among them. Butler, who was known as the Reverend in
acknowledgement of his abstemious ways, helped Weatherford drill the band.
Moreno characterised Butler as the ?gentleman of the orchestra?. Moreno
added, ?He never drank in his life and if someone said, ?How about a round
of drink?? Roy would say, ?I?ll have an ice-cream. You enjoy beer, I enjoy
ice-cream.? Butler went on to lead his own band at Greens, located where
the Taj Intercontinental now stands.

Both Weatherford (who married an Anglo-Indian woman, before dying of
cholera in Calcutta in 1945, aged 41) and Butler recruited Goan sidemen,
plugging Bombay into the source of jazz. The trumpet player Frank Fernand,
who played in Weatherford band with his Goan compatriots, Micky Correa and
Josique Menzies, says that his stint with the American taught him to ?play
like a negro?. Moreno helped Fernand develop the ability to hit long, high
notes, eventually extending his range up to E flat. Butler, it must be
noted, was less than thrilled with his Goan employees. ?My short stretch as
a bandleader in India was not too earth-shaking,? he told Storyville. ?The
local musicians were not too familiar with jazz at that time. I understood
that there are some very good jazzmen out there now, but the time was too
short for anything to develop, good or bad.? For their part, some of the
Goan musicians weren?t overly impressed with Butler, either. They believed
his decision to stay in India was motivated by the fear that he wouldn?t
find work in the US. As Fernand put it, ?The faltu fellows stayed, the good
ones went home.?





----
Continued in Part 2
----





This article in Word format was sent to me, on request, by the Editor of
MansWorld Magazine, N.Radhakrishnan, thus saving me the trouble of typing
it out. Please reciprocate his good gesture by visiting the site
http://www.mansworldindia.com


Cheers!

Cecil


====
Gilbert Lawrence
2003-08-09 16:57:01 UTC
Permalink
Hi all,

Great articles on the Goan culture in Bombay in the 1950-1970 and
beyond.
I do wish Bernard Colaco of ?UK / ?Macau and Constantino Xavier of
Portugal will read these articles and know about Goan culture and the
artists in the Bombay / Mumbai Diaspora. Regards, GL

-----Original Message-----
From: goanet-admin at goanet.org [mailto:goanet-admin at goanet.org] On Behalf
Of Cecil Pinto
Sent: Saturday, August 09, 2003 5:45 AM
To: Goa-Goans at yahoogroups.com; konkaniforum at yahoogroups.com
Cc: aldona-net at yahoogroups.com; goanet at goanet.org
Subject: [aldona-net] [Goanet]Chris & Lorna (Part 1) - by Naresh
Fernandes - MansWorld magazine July 2003

Love and longing in Mumbai?s Jazz Age (Part 1 of 3 Parts)
by Naresh Fernandes - MansWorld magazine July 2003



For over five decades, well into the late 1960s before prohibition,
taxation and rock-and-roll killed it, Mumbai boasted of one of the most
vibrant jazz scenes in the world, outside of the US. On Churchgate
Street,
stretching from the Marine Drive sea front all the way up to Flora
Fountain the sound of jazz spilled out through the doors of packed
night
clubs like Ambassador, Napoli, The Talk of the Town, Gaylord?s, Ritz,
Little Hut, Bistro and Volga. Not to speak of the Rendezvous at the Taj.

The legendary pianist and composer Dave Brubeck was impressed enough by
the
local musicians to attempt to make some recordings during one of his
visits. Set against this backdrop is the tragic love affair of tenor
saxophonist and band leader Chris Perry and singer Lorna Cordeiro.
Naresh
Fernandes tells their story for the first time.


---------


Their eyes give it away. Chris Perry wears a slick black jacket, the
sleeves of his crisp white shirt revealing the glint of dark cuff links.

His fingers clasp a gleaming tenor saxophone with a lover?s
gentleness. Arms crossed coquettishly above her waist, Lorna Cordeiro
is
chic in a bouffant and a form-fitting gown that shows a flash of ankle.
They stare into each other?s eyes, mesmerised. Behind them looms a giant

camera aperture borrowed from the opening sequence of the Bond films.

You couldn?t miss the poster as you sauntered down Jamshetji Tata Road
in
downtown Bombay. It hung outside the Astoria Hotel, across the street
from
the octagonal Art Deco turret of Eros cinema, inviting the city to Chris

and Lorna?s daily shows at the Venice nightclub. It was 1971. India was
savouring its newfound place on the world?s stage. The country?s armed
forces had decisively liberated Bangladesh and the idealism of
Independence
had welled up again. India?s middle classes were capturing their
polyester
memories on Agfa Click IIIs that cost 46.50 rupees (taxes extra),
aspiring
to the lifestyles of ?The Jet Set Air Hostesses? described in The
Illustrated Weekly of India (price: 85 paise), and being encouraged by
newspaper ads to ?Go gay with Gaylord fine filter cigarettes?.

As the City of Gold bubbled through its jazz age, Lorna and Chris
enthralled Bombay with their shows at Venice each night. Remo Fernandes,

who would go on to become the first Indian pop musician to record an
album
of original English-language tunes, was among those locked in the spell.

?Two artists sometimes ignite a creative chemistry in each other which
goes
beyond all logical explanation. Mere mortals can only look and listen in

awe,? he rhapsodised. ?In such duos, one plus one does not make two. It
makes a number so immeasurable, it defies all laws of calculus.?

But the sparks that flew at Venice gradually built into a roaring
conflagration. As Remo put it: ?Hyper-intense, high-temperament artistic

relationships often end in emotional disaster, like two comets when they

steer too dangerously close. Chris?s and Lorna?s, as we all know, was no

exception.?

Like the myths about the city in which they soared to fame, the tale of
Chris and Lorna has gained so much in the re-telling it?s sometimes
difficult to thresh the apocrypha from the actual. Thirty years after
the
two stopped performing together, old-time musicians in the bylanes of
Dhobi
Talao and Bandra still beg anonymity as they reminisce in sad whispers.

?He was shameless. He left his wife and three small children for that
girl.?

?Chris and Lorna were in love. When they fought, they became mortal
enemies. He destroyed her and he destroyed himself.?

?She was very good singer. Beyond that, she was nothing. She got her
break
with Chris Perry. He made contract with her. She couldn?t sing without
his
permission. She had no brains, so she signed. Then he went back to his
wife.?

?He didn?t let her perform with anyone else. He threatened to break the
legs of one Hindu fellow who tried to get her to sing with him.?

?She hit the bottle, men. She became an alcoholic and just disappeared.?

Chris Perry who was born Pereira died on January 25, 2002, his last
years
hobbled by Parkinson?s disease. Lorna has refused to recount her version
of
events for publication. But the fidelity of her contralto booming out of

our speakers, embroidered with Chris?s perfectly crafted sax filigrees,
speaks its own truth.


Ronnie Monserrate was 19 when he began to play Sunday gigs at Venice
with
the Chris Perry band, sitting in for the regular pianist. Venice had a
reputation. It was the jazzman?s jazz haunt, the rendezvous for
musicians
from around the country and occasionally from around the world. Dave
Brubeck swung by when he visited Bombay in 1958, as Duke Ellington had
when
his band set out on their famous world tour of 1963. As Ronnie tells it,

the dapper Chris Perry was the musician?s musician: ?He had perfect
pitch.
He was an arranger, a composer, a player.? Chris played both trumpet and

saxophone, sometimes switching from one to the other mid-tune, a feat
that
required elaborate lip control. His trumpet tone was broad and true. He
didn?t have flashy technique, but the notes he coaxed out of his horn
had a
mellowness that kept the fans coming back night after night.

Chris was 43 at the time, Lorna was 25. No one seems quite sure exactly
how
they met, but everyone?s agreed that he groomed her into one of the
Bombay?s finest crooners. One version maintains that Lorna got her break

when still in school, after she won the Connie Francis soundalike
competition at Metro cinema. This prompted a musician named Raymond
Albuqerque to invite her to sing in his show at the Bandra Fair. Her
rendition of Underneath the Mango Tree got the crowds so fired up that
Chris Perry, already an established performer, went to her home to
audition
her. She was just 16 when she joined Perry?s band.

A vocalist in the Shirley Bassey mould, Lorna belted out every tune like
it
was her last time on stage. ?She had a lot of black feel,? is how Ronnie

describes her performances. ?You could see the intensity when she was
on
stage. She?d give it her best, every time. She was like a magnet. You
couldn?t help but be attracted to her when she was on stage. And with
Chris
Perry band by her side, it was like magic happening. There was
incredible
attraction. There was a lot of love in the interaction. It was apparent
in
their body language. They brought out the best in each other. They?d
look
into each other?s eyes and their understanding was so great that there?d
be
spontaneous combustion.?

Offstage, though, things could get awkward. Any man attempting to talk
to
Lorna was liable to get a taste of Perry?s famously volatile fists.
During
breaks, the musicians would sit around their table, absolutely silent.
?They were jolly people but they were afraid to laugh around Chris,?
Ronnie
says. Ronnie was the only exception, perhaps because his youth made him
seem unthreatening. Two decades later, he?d find opportunity to call in
that bond of trust.

Venice was around the corner from Bombay?s swinging jazz strip,
Churchgate
Street (now Veer Nariman Road). Pianists, trios and quartets were to be
heard all the way down the 200-metre thoroughfare as it led off from
Churchgate station to the Arabian Sea. First came Berry?s, with tandoori

butter chicken that was the stuff of Bombay legend and accomplished
piano-fronted groups led by Dorothy Jones and Stanley Pinto. Across the
fence was Bombelli?s, named after its Swiss owner, where a trio held
sway
as ad men sipped cappuccinos. Then came the Ambassador, where Toni
Pinto?s
quintet encapsulated Bombay?s diversity: the group had two Jews a
singer
named Ephrim Elias and drummer Abie Cohen, an Anglo-Indian tenor
saxophonist named Norman Mobsby, and, in addition to Pinto, another
Goan,
the bassist Clement Furtado.

Pinto?s kingdom was named the Other Room, so called because after the
rich
and famous had finished drinking at the bar, they?d say, ?Let?s go to
the
other room.? He ruled for 16 years from 1958, his sharply dressed group
spinning out hard-driving bop and light classics, and playing back-up
for
cabarets and visiting acrobats, magicians and flamenco dancers. The
Ambassador was owned by the cigar-chomping Jack Voyantzis, an ebullient
Greek who was assisted by his brother, Socrates. The siblings had
started
their subcontinental journey in Rangoon, opened a caf? in Delhi, and
finally found their way to Bombay, where they transformed a hotel known
as
the Argentinian into the Ambassador. The cream of Bombay society turned
out
to catch Toni?s tightly-rehearsed band. Toni remembers once looking up
from
his piano to see three of the city?s leading editors appreciatively
tapping
their feet: Rusi Karanjia, editor of the left-wing tabloid Blitz, D F
Karaka, editor of the rival Current, and Frank Moraes, editor of the
Indian
Express, with his American girlfriend. Another time, as the band was
going
through its routine, Toni realised that someone from the back of the
room
was playing along on a trumpet. It turned out to be American hornman
Eddie
Calvert. ?He came for dinner one night even though he was staying at the

Ritz,? Toni says, and he asked his drummer, Bobby Hadrian, to go back
and
get his instrument. Calvert and Toni?s band jammed for an hour, playing

the tunes the American had made famous: Cherry Pink, Begin the Beguine,
Wonderland by Night.

Elsewhere on Churchgate Street, music spilled out through the doors of
the
Napoli, The Talk of the Town and Gaylord?s. Opposite Venice, there was
jazz
at the Ritz, while at the Little Hut, Neville Thomas led a group calling

itself Three Guys and a Doll. Past Flora Fountain stood Bistro and
Volga,
home to a quartet led by the grandfatherly baritone saxophonist Hecke
Kingdom.

Dave Brubeck was impressed enough by the local musicians to attempt to
make
some recordings with them during his visit. But Bombay defeated him. He
later recounted the episode to an interviewer: ?The current fluctuated
in
Bombay in those days and so the tape would speed up and slow down. Like,

when you were shaving, the speed of the motor would go up and down. It
ruined one of my favourite tapes I've ever made.? Another visiting
jazzman,
the pianist Hampton Hawes, was overwhelmed by problems that were rather
more basic. ?Bombay turned me around,? he wrote. ?I?d never seen poverty

before.? Art, he decided, was irrelevant amidst the gnawing deprivation.

?Here I was thinking about making a big splash, a hit record, going home
a
hero, and I?m walking the streets with motherfuckers who don?t even know

what a piece of bread is, let along Stravinsky or Charlie Parker. If
Bird
was alive and played for them they wouldn?t be able to hear him because
they?d be too damn hungry.?

Admittedly, jazz had always been the preserve of Bombay?s elite. But
while
the audiences were upper crust, the musicians who cooked up the
syncopated
rhythms were not. Like Toni Pinto, Ronnie Monserrate, Chris and Lorna,
the
majority were Roman Catholics strivers from the former Portuguese colony
of
Goa, 550 kilometres south of Bombay. They?d been an important part of
the
Bombay music scene since the 1920s, when Bombay began to develop its
appetite for what was then called ?hot music?. Jazz had made its way
from
New Orleans in the waxy grooves of phonograph records and travelled over

the oceans with touring American bands that played for the
administrators
of the Raj. Bombay?s first jazz concerts were performed at the
Bandstand,
south of the Oval. Among the earliest jazzmen to play an extended stint
in
Bombay was Leon Abbey, a violinist from Minnesota, who led an
eight-piece
band at the Taj during the 1935-?36 season. Abbey wore white tails on
stage
and played the freshest sounds. He told one interviewer, ?I kept up with

the latest numbers because someone would always come up to the bandstand

and say, ?Old Bean, would you play so and so
?, because as far as he was

concerned, we should know how to play everything that had ever been
written.? Midway through the trip, the Taj management sent Abbey and
saxophonist Art Lanier back to New York to pick up the latest music.

Abbey?s outfit was replaced by the Symphonians, fronted by the cornet
player Cricket Smith. Smith had been featured on the seminal recordings
made by James Reese Europe?s Society Orchestra in 1913 and 1914,
capturing
jazz at the moment of its transition from the relatively unsophisticated

ragtime style. Smith ?signed his contract for a fixed amount of money
and
two Coronas a day, so every day, the manager would have to bring him his

cigars?, recalls Luis Moreno, a Spanish trumpet player who lived in
Bombay
for 20 years. ?He was a character.?

In 1938, pianist Teddy Weatherford, who had played with Louis Armstrong,

took the stage with his men. His swinging style and treble voicing had
been
an important influence on jazz during its formative years. The Taj, it
would seem, wasn?t quite the genteel venue it now is not at least from

the way Weatherford?s occasional Russian bassist named ?Innocent Nick?
described the gigs to the jazz magazine Storyville. ?Teddy used to play
downstairs, in the Tavern of the Taj, for the soldiers, sailors and
others,
a very rough place,? Nick said. ?Teddy would play for hours without a
break. Even with drinks, he would continue one-handed. He had tremendous

hands.?

For the African-American musicians, Bombay provided refuge from the
apartheid in the U.S. Men like Weatherford and his sidemen, such as the
saxophonist Roy Butler, spent long years shuttling between Europe and
the
subcontinent, where racial barriers seemed non-existent, at least for
them.
Butler?s years in India as a Weatherford sideman, he told Storyville,
were
among his happiest the work was relatively easy, the pay and conditions

good, he was treated splendidly by both management and clientele, and
enjoyed the luxurious life under the British Raj. The Taj management, on

its part, honoured Weatherford by naming a dish after him: Poires Glace
Weatherford. (The absence of colour prejudice was only to be expected.
After all, industrial baron Jamshetji Tata was moved to build the Taj
after
being prevented one leisurely Bombay evening from dining at the
Europeans-only Pyrke?s Apollo Hotel. Later, he famously hung a notice in

the Taj forbidding entry to South Africans and dogs.)

Weatherford?s sidemen were an eclectic lot and opened Bombay?s ears to a

wealth of new sounds, the Cuban drumming of Luis Pedroso and the Spanish

brass of Luis Moreno, among them. Butler, who was known as the Reverend
in
acknowledgement of his abstemious ways, helped Weatherford drill the
band.
Moreno characterised Butler as the ?gentleman of the orchestra?. Moreno
added, ?He never drank in his life and if someone said, ?How about a
round
of drink?? Roy would say, ?I?ll have an ice-cream. You enjoy beer, I
enjoy
ice-cream.? Butler went on to lead his own band at Greens, located where

the Taj Intercontinental now stands.

Both Weatherford (who married an Anglo-Indian woman, before dying of
cholera in Calcutta in 1945, aged 41) and Butler recruited Goan sidemen,

plugging Bombay into the source of jazz. The trumpet player Frank
Fernand,
who played in Weatherford band with his Goan compatriots, Micky Correa
and
Josique Menzies, says that his stint with the American taught him to
?play
like a negro?. Moreno helped Fernand develop the ability to hit long,
high
notes, eventually extending his range up to E flat. Butler, it must be
noted, was less than thrilled with his Goan employees. ?My short stretch
as
a bandleader in India was not too earth-shaking,? he told Storyville.
?The
local musicians were not too familiar with jazz at that time. I
understood
that there are some very good jazzmen out there now, but the time was
too
short for anything to develop, good or bad.? For their part, some of the

Goan musicians weren?t overly impressed with Butler, either. They
believed
his decision to stay in India was motivated by the fear that he wouldn?t

find work in the US. As Fernand put it, ?The faltu fellows stayed, the
good
ones went home.?





----
Continued in Part 2
----





This article in Word format was sent to me, on request, by the Editor of

MansWorld Magazine, N.Radhakrishnan, thus saving me the trouble of
typing
it out. Please reciprocate his good gesture by visiting the site
http://www.mansworldindia.com


Cheers!

Cecil


====



########################################################################
##
# Send submissions for Goanet to goanet at goanet.org
#
# PLEASE remember to stay on-topic (related to Goa), and avoid top-posts
#
# More details on Goanet at http://joingoanet.shorturl.com/
#
# Please keep your discussion/tone polite, to reflect respect to others
#
########################################################################
##

------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor ---------------------~-->
Low on Ink? Get 80% off inkjet cartridges & Free Shipping at
77Colors.com.
We have your brand: HP, Epson, Lexmark, Canon, Compaq and more!
http://www.c1tracking.com/l.asp?cid=5981
http://us.click.yahoo.com/DmnqpB/IyhGAA/ySSFAA/8XQrlB/TM
---------------------------------------------------------------------~->

To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
aldona-net-unsubscribe at yahoogroups.com



Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
Bernado Colaco
2003-08-10 03:49:37 UTC
Permalink
I wonder when Jazz music coming from capitalism was a
part of Goan culture? Ok, Sodam chintalim vehtelem
munon.... was a class act!

Cola?o
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
Hi all,
Great articles on the Goan culture in Bombay in the
1950-1970 and
beyond.
I do wish Bernard Colaco of ?UK / ?Macau and
Constantino Xavier of
Portugal will read these articles and know about
Goan culture and the
artists in the Bombay / Mumbai Diaspora. Regards, GL
===
__________________________________________________
Yahoo! Plus - For a better Internet experience
http://uk.promotions.yahoo.com/yplus/yoffer.html
Gabe Menezes
2003-08-10 17:22:05 UTC
Permalink
Sent: Saturday, August 09, 2003 10:44 AM
Subject: [Goanet]Chris & Lorna (Part 1) - by Naresh Fernandes - MansWorld
magazine July 2003


Love and longing in Mumbai's Jazz Age (Part 1 of 3 Parts)
by Naresh Fernandes - MansWorld magazine July 2003


RESPONSE:

A fantastically written article which not only sheds light on Chris Perry's
and Lorna's story but which also tells us about Bombay's famous jazz of
years gone by. To boot, it gives a history lesson on the migration of Goans
to Bombay and their occupations.

My father was born in Chadan Waddi (Dhobi Thalao). It was from here that he
emigrated as a young man to Nairobi, Kenya. The story goes that he was
always reminiscing about Bombay, so much so that he got given the nick name
Bomboikar. He is dead and gone now. If any one want to know my back ground
from Kenya I only have to tell them that I am Bomboikar's son and
immediately they know where I come from !

Cheers,

Gabe
Bernado Colaco
2003-08-11 12:01:11 UTC
Permalink
Since Goa is a potpouri of cultures let us now accept
capitalistic Jazz as a part of our culture (Thanks to
Goans in Mumbai). I hope this will solve the name
calling issue.:))

--- "Frederick Noronha (FN)" <fred at bytesforall.org>
wrote: > On Sun, 10 Aug 2003, [iso-8859-1] Bernado
Colaco
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
Post by Bernado Colaco
I wonder when Jazz music coming from capitalism
was a
Post by Bernado Colaco
part of Goan culture? Ok, Sodam chintalim vehtelem
munon.... was a class act!
Cola?o
--- Gilbert Lawrence <gilbertlaw at adelphia.net>
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
Hi all,
Great articles on the Goan culture in Bombay in
the
Post by Bernado Colaco
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
1950-1970 and
beyond.
I do wish Bernard Colaco of ?UK / ?Macau and
Constantino Xavier of
Portugal will read these articles and know about
Goan culture and the
artists in the Bombay / Mumbai Diaspora.
Regards, GL
Bernado at his usual xenophobic self. (Even if he
hasn't explained his
real identity, and why he claims to be based in
London while getting his
posts put out via Macau. Neither his claims to know
what pre-1961 Goan
really was, while later claiming he was born
post-1961.)
*What* is Goan culture? What is the culture of Goans
today? Is it
something frozen in time? Is it something restricted
to only one
language? (Prof Peter Nazareth comments that Goans
write in 13
languages.)
If he follow Bernado's twisted logic of "cultural
purity" we could next
be arguing that man originated in Goa...
Or is it something that today encompasses various
continents, various
languages, and the influences that have come to set
on this tiny place on
planet earth?
To one's mind, Goa is a melting pot (of various
people, coming in at
different points of time, and various rulers or
immigrants or invaders,
who have shaped the region into being what it is).
We are a fruit salad
of sorts, and there's nothing wrong with that. Over
the centuries,
different groups have been negotiating cultural and
physical space with
each other, sometimes peacefully and sometimes
violently.
As much as we claim to have wrong done to ourselves,
if we dig deep enough
we'd find that our own groups have wronged others in
the past.
The earlier we acknowledge this reality the better.
To argue that Jazz cannot have anything to do with
Goa is a few steps away
from saying that the Mando cannot be really Goan,
since it was first sung
only sometime around the nineteenth century and, in
any case, has a range
of global influences ranging from the Portuguese and
the European to the
Far East Asian costumes the women-singers wore. Or,
it is close to an
argument that chief minister Parrikar recently
repeated, that English
*cannot* be a legit language in Goa because of its
foreign origins.
All stem from a similar set of insecurities, and a
desire to dominate by
defining things in a way convenient to oneself.
FN
__________________________________________________
Yahoo! Plus - For a better Internet experience
http://uk.promotions.yahoo.com/yplus/yoffer.html
Eugene Correia
2003-08-11 14:38:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gabe Menezes
A fantastically written article which not only sheds
light on Chris Perry's
and Lorna's story but which also tells us about
Bombay's famous jazz of
years gone by. To boot, it gives a history lesson on
the migration of Goans
to Bombay and their occupations.
Cheers,
Gabe
Naresh's piece is good reading at least for many who
were not aware of the role of Goans in Mumbai's music
world.
But Naresh's saying that people said Chris left his
wife and family for Lorna isn't true. That Chris
wouldn't abandon his wife and family was one of the
issues in Chris and Lorna's relationship.
Chris was domineering, to say the least. He
"controlled" Lorna and, according to some, he made a
contract with Lorna that will never sing for anyone
except him.
Even after their break-up he tried his best to prevent
her from singing for bands and in films. He and his
brothers and friends would create trouble for bands
who engaged Lorna to sign for weddings and parties.
Chris was a "dada" in the Goan music world. He and his
brother Paul were "toughies" and none dared to mess
with them.
I often saw Chris and Lorna arguing near Lorna's home
late at nights. I would nod a hello and proceed or
sometimes ignore them. They, along with other
Dhobitalao musicians, eat at a roadside stall.
They would come walking across Cross Maidan where a
new restaurant had opened (forget name), long after
their Venice days.
At my meetings with Orlando and others, we often
discussed Goan musicians. Many of those names Naresh
has mentioned came up.
I knew some of them or saw some of them in action. I
had once a long talk with Frank Fernand on the
contribution of Goans to Hindi film music. Maybe,
Naresh's third part will have more names such as
Sebastian Fernandes, whose son lives in Toronto. He
was one of the greatest "arranger" in Hindi film
industry.
Need to hear of another jazz great, Braz Gonsalves.
Still a big name in the jazz world. Made an
unsuccessful stint in Toronto where he migrated. He
returned back. I believe Braz's wife, Yvonne, a singer
in her own right, is one of Chic Chocolate's daughter
(nee verification).
Braz's daughter is an accomplished singer. She didn't
migrate as her boyfriend and she were in a band
playign at the Taj.
We had long talks during his brief stay in Toronto,
and earlier when he and Chris came for the First Int'l
Goan Convention in 1988. Both together were great, and
the recording of their show on casette is a treasure.
I am not sure if copies are still available.
After my dad retired from Indian Navy (civilian), he
played in the Hindi film music. During his Navy days
he played occasionally for the Bombay Orchestra, and
often at the Grand Hotel (Ballard Estate) for D'Mello
and his quartet, which played chamber music.
He would tell me many stories of fine musicians of his
time and before him. Wish I had made notes of it.
Someone asked how Naresh may have sourced it. One of
his best sources could be Dr. Thereza Albuquerque. Her
book, The Catholics of Bombay, deals with musicians
and many of the names are mentioned there. If anyone
has a chance to read it, please do so.
Besides, Ronnie Monserrate is another source. But
Ronnie was young to know many things and most of the
tales have been passed his father's generation to his
own.
He quoted Anglo-Lusitanian, a fine paper. Another good
source is perhaps Goan World, and copies of it are
lying with the Heras Institute at St. Xavier's in
Mumbai.
Naresh is young (perhaps in his mid30s), and I met him
when he was in New York working for the Wall Street
Journal. When I learnt he was leaving WSJ to go back
to the Times of India as news editor or deputy news
editor, I sent him an email asking why he was leaving
a good job.
His reply that the US doesn't interest him, and he
needs to do journalism where he could be a
contributing force.
Gilbert Lawrence
2003-08-12 00:27:23 UTC
Permalink
Please disregard the prior post. OR the subject need to be changed to
"Vishy Washy's stand on Rape".

Response:
This is the strangest apologetic response I have ever read. Is the
following what you will tell the girl you just raped? Is this what you
will tell her parents and brothers and elders and the law?

Here is another suggestion. Go over the post you made on "Rape" with
your Mother and your father. Perhaps they will enlighten you - better
late than never!!!.

I do not feel like sending you my regards. GL

-----------------------------------------
You guys are turning out Vishwanath into Pepsi and Coca-cola. Things are
blown out of proportion.

Regards
Vishwanath

----------------

Well said Gilbert!

Remember now, these are the people who are the public faces of the Right
Wing Hindutva movement ( just as wicked as the Rt Wing Nuts among
Muslims and alleged Christians ).

I would have excused this vile comment from Mr. Shirwaikar if

1. He made a slip
2. He was being glib or
3. He was not conversant in the English language
Gilbert Lawrence
2003-08-12 01:03:23 UTC
Permalink
Eugene Correia writes:
Naresh's piece is good reading at least for many who were not aware of
the role of Goans in Mumbai's music world.

Comment:
Great and informative piece by Naresh Fernandes. This was a very well
researched article. From the responses, the Bombay Goans were very
nostalgic. And those Goans, who left Goa and Bombay bypassing all this
culture, got a lesson on Goan culture in Bombay.

One of the reasons why Goan culture in Bombay flourished and prospered-
perhaps more than in Goa was because of the market place. In Bombay
there were the financial resources of the listeners and the clientele
who appreciated that music and dance. Most of the clientele for these
Goan Musical Greats were rich Bombaywallas who frequented the night
clubs, other club houses, ritzy eating establishments and Bollywood.

But before the Goans became Greats in Bombay and in Naresh Fernandes'
article, the 'not so rich' Goans supported and nourished the Goan
artists. Here may be a learning lesson for the current Goan Diasporas.
But before we get to that, the breeding ground for young musically
inclined Goan boys to develop and polish their act were the Goan
functions - weddings and dances (through out the year and specially
Christmas and New Year season) hosted by the Catholic Gymkhana, Byculla
Mechanics, the Bandra gymkhana etc.

The foremost to stimulate the spirit of competition and excellence were
the "Teens and Tunes" musical and dance competitions. The article did
not mention about this institution and whether it still exists. Perhaps
some GoaNetters form Bombay may enlighten us on this. In the seventies,
we had the high school and college 4-5 member band groups with names
like: five stars, Caravels, Drifters, Gay Dukes, Gemini four to name a
few, among many others that vied for the annual top three spots in the
young Goan music world. These young boys were basically home grown
without fancy/expensive equipment that struggled and were motivated to
learn and master the art. There were no school or college music
departments as we have in the USA.

In the Goan Diaspora, with all the support system in the schools and in
the home, we have not been able to stimulate many young Goan boys and
girls into music. And those that made it did so on their own without
much Goan community support. The only time the Goan community
appreciated these artists was after the world at large gave them
accolades and recognized their talent. Perhaps Toronto has some Goan
young music groups. But to the best of my knowledge New York City and
Chicago do not have any. How can the community nurture that talent?
Every Indian function I attend has performances by 7-15 year-old boys
and girls on Indian music and dance and that is great.

This is a call to action by the Goan community in the Diaspora!!!
Gilbert Lawrence
2003-08-12 03:44:11 UTC
Permalink
Hi Helga,
I thank you for your correction. The point I was making, the artists
cannot live on their art and neither they nor their art can thrive if
there are no paying customers or clientele (when they are alive). Or
else they will be like Van Gough etc. It is for the community to
support them and appreciate their work during their life time as well as
in their formative years.

You will have to admit while there were some "pobre fidalgos" in Goa,
the vast majority of "pre-1961" Goans could not afford the luxury of
art. Furthermore some "empregados" who lived in the "big city" of Panjim
and Margao had electricity and transportation to go to attend cultural
functions. In small village "pre-1961", there was just the church music
and weddings where the same old music and Konkani Cantaram and mandos
were played and sung. The only musician of repute in a village what the
choir master. Or was I living in a different part of Goa than you?

Gilbert.

----------
Gilbert, perhaps you meant that JAZZ flourished in Bombay more than in
Goa
because Goan culture has always flourished in Goa! Our mandos and our
tiatros will never die. Jazz was popular with the well heeled
'Bombaywallas'
probably because they were exposed to music in English whereas in Goa
Konkani and Portuguese music was more appreciated.
The article by Naresh Ferandes was excellent - he have us a glimpse
into a
Bombay we had not imagined. I chanced upon another of his articles TOMB
RAIDER -Looking for St. Francis Xavier which can be found at
http://www.transitionmagazine.com/online/tombraider.htm
Its hilarious and I think everyone will enjoy it. There is a verse or a
poem
by Eunice de Souza which could have been my old aunt speaking!
---Helga
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
One of the reasons why Goan culture in Bombay flourished and
prospered-
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
perhaps more than in Goa was because of the market place.
########################################################################
##
# Send submissions for Goanet to goanet at goanet.org
#
# PLEASE remember to stay on-topic (related to Goa), and avoid top-posts
#
# More details on Goanet at http://joingoanet.shorturl.com/
#
# Please keep your discussion/tone polite, to reflect respect to others
#
########################################################################
##
Thomas Albrecht
2003-08-12 11:21:44 UTC
Permalink
Hello

Is somebody there, who can tell me, if it is possible to go by ship from
mumbai to Goa or back in the upcoming winter season? And is there a link/url
for that?

One more question I would have:

I was invited a few years ago by the son of Dr Monteiro (whom I did knew
too in 1972!) in Candolim to book at his place, when I will came to Goa. But
I lost the adress. As I will be in Goa at Xmas - I would ask, if anybody
knows his internet/e-mail adress

Thank you so much

Thomas Albrecht
Germany




##########################################################################
# Send submissions for Goanet to goanet at goanet.org #

# PLEASE remember to stay on-topic (related to Goa), and avoid top-posts #
# More details on Goanet at http://joingoanet.shorturl.com/ #
# Please keep your discussion/tone polite, to reflect respect to others #
##########################################################################
Eugene Correia
2003-08-13 02:20:18 UTC
Permalink
The classic jazz may not have been heard in Goa before
1961. Pieces such as Helga mentioned -- Satchmo's What
a Wonderful World -- was played by the 'swing bands'.
Jazz didn't bloom in Bombay till the late 60s. Prior
to the 60s, there was a mixture of jazz and "big band"
music. Chris Perry was influenced by Miles Davis and
he named one of his sons after the jazz legend. Chris
also tried to imitate the sounds of Louis Armstrong,
especially Hello Dolly.
But classic jazz, of the New Orleans type, was
confined to places like Venic and Gaylord.
I covered the first Jazz Yatra in 1978 at the Rang
Bhavan. It was a great experience listening to Sonny
Rollins.
I also enjoyed Japan's Sadao Watanabe Quintet, who
played some swing.
The Indian group included Louis Banks and Braz
Gonsalves. Rudy Cotton was also there.
Niranjan Jhaveri organized the Jazz Yatra, and I
believe he still does it.

Eugene Correia

__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software
http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com
Gilbert Lawrence
2003-08-13 04:15:19 UTC
Permalink
Hi Helga,

Thanks for your polite response and for clarifying the culture /music
scene in Goa. You are right that we wrongly compare and get defensive.
We need to compare and look for any learning lessons / opportunities to
improve.

In my post I was not talking about jazz in Goa and not even Jazz in
Bombay. I am an authority on neither. My taste (and I know little about
it) is just good-old dance music.

I was not talking about the music /art greats in Bombay, Goa or NY. I
was talking about how to get there (to the top). And what can the Goan
community do to help our youth to get there and in the process enrich
Goan culture for the masses. Does Goa (and Bombay) currently have any
music (solo and band) and singing competitions (like 'Teens and Tunes')
in the various villages and talukas - - Not at the state level for the
'Greats'?

Regards, Gilbert.

----------------------------------------------------------------
Hi Gilbert!
I wasnt correcting you just clarifying!
Yes patronage of the arts or the lack of it is a very old problem - even
older than Van Gogh and artists who have been encouraged by kings and
wealthy men and women should consider themselves lucky for there are
many
who have not. In India we have not laid great emphasis on the Arts in
the
schools either.But even with all this apathy we still produced Emiliano
Cruz, Remo Fernandes and so many talented tiatristas!
But comparing Goa and Bombay as many people tend to do doesnt really
make
sense - Goa was and still is a very small place that charms everyone
while
Bombay is a metropolis with money. So its understandable that musicians
gravitated to it then and now - wasn't that what the Big Apple was all
about? I heard that all the great jazz and blues singers said that you
hadn't made it until you had plucked the Big Apple which was New York. I
could be wrong about the origin of term but not about the importance of
making it big in NY.
I cant really comment on what pre- 1961 Goa was like - mine are just
stories
woven by my mother and her family for the entertainment of my sister
and I.
And I do not know what the 'pobre fidalgos' were doing either -
probably
living their lives of 'pobreza' and 'fidalguice'! Well if they were
'pobres'
then that counts them out as patrons of music. As far as I know the
'ricos'
were using their money to built elaborate mansions stuffed with
chandeliers
and Macao chinaware. Which reminds me that everyone has got to read
Naresh's
other article - its about Macao and its very funny!
--Helga



----- Original Message -----
From: "Gilbert Lawrence" <gilbertlaw at adelphia.net>
To: <goanet at goanet.org>
Sent: Monday, August 11, 2003 11:44 PM
Subject: RE: [Goanet]Another article by Naresh Fernandes
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
Hi Helga,
I thank you for your correction. The point I was making, the artists
cannot live on their art and neither they nor their art can thrive if
there are no paying customers or clientele (when they are alive). Or
else they will be like Van Gough etc. It is for the community to
support them and appreciate their work during their life time as well
as
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
in their formative years.
You will have to admit while there were some "pobre fidalgos" in Goa,
the vast majority of "pre-1961" Goans could not afford the luxury of
art. Furthermore some "empregados" who lived in the "big city" of
Panjim
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
and Margao had electricity and transportation to go to attend cultural
functions. In small village "pre-1961", there was just the church
music
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
and weddings where the same old music and Konkani Cantaram and mandos
were played and sung. The only musician of repute in a village what
the
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
choir master. Or was I living in a different part of Goa than you?
########################################################################
##
# Send submissions for Goanet to goanet at goanet.org
#
# PLEASE remember to stay on-topic (related to Goa), and avoid top-posts
#
# More details on Goanet at http://joingoanet.shorturl.com/
#
# Please keep your discussion/tone polite, to reflect respect to others
#
########################################################################
##
gilbert
2003-08-13 04:26:50 UTC
Permalink
--- In Goanet2003 at yahoogroups.com, "Frederick Noronha (FN)"
Post by Frederick Noronha (FN)
A hovercraft that was launched on this route sometime in the
'nineties
Post by Frederick Noronha (FN)
could not be sustained due to choppy seas, missed trips and the
fact that
Post by Frederick Noronha (FN)
the costly (made-in-Europe) hovercraft were quite close to the then
plane-fares.
-------------------------------------------------------
Fred,
it wasnt a hovercraft, which rides on a cushion of air, with no
underwater drag, but a catamaran, whose underwater dynamic shape
produces lift and reduces drag, thus increasing its speed, unlike a
conventional hull. An hovercraft can beach on hard land, while a
catamaran requires a jetty for passengers to disembark.
regards, Gilbert.
James Almeida
2003-08-13 11:14:37 UTC
Permalink
From: "Eddie Fernandes" <eddie at fernandes.u-net.com>
Reply-To: goanet at goanet.org
To: <goanet at goanet.org>
Subject: Re: [Goanet]Ship from mumbai to goa?
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2003 08:15:44 +0100
Headline: Indian cruise liners to tap foreign and upmarket desi tourists
Source: Economic Times of India, 3 Aug. 2003 at
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/cms.dll/html/uncomp/articleshow?msid=110306
BANGALORE: The Ministry of Shipping plans to start a domestic "cruise
shipping" service along the west coast on the lines of "Palace on Wheels"
to
cater to foreign and upmarket domestic tourists.
"We want to start domestic cruise shipping, something on the pattern of
Palace on Wheels," Union Minister for Shipping Shatrughan Sinha told PTI
here.
I'm just curious whether the government has any competences to enter and
compete in the cruise ship business. I am positive that "Shotgun" Sinha
does not! :-) This would be a utter wastage of the taxpayer monies.
Would it not be better to leave these initiatives to the private sector?

Best,
James

_________________________________________________________________
STOP MORE SPAM with the new MSN 8 and get 2 months FREE*
http://join.msn.com/?page=features/junkmail
gilbert
2003-08-13 14:45:09 UTC
Permalink
--- In Goanet2003 at yahoogroups.com, "James Almeida" <goanet at g...>
Post by James Almeida
I'm just curious whether the government has any competences to
enter and
Post by James Almeida
compete in the cruise ship business. I am positive that "Shotgun"
Sinha
Post by James Almeida
does not! :-) This would be a utter wastage of the taxpayer
monies.
Post by James Almeida
Would it not be better to leave these initiatives to the private
sector?
Post by James Almeida
Best,
James
------------------------------------------------
You're dead right about the lack of competence because it has been
proven for the nth time that whatever the govt. runs in the travel
and hospitality industry is loss making. In the case of palace on
wheels, the losses are huge because the pricing is too steep, and the
biggest users are govt. bureaucrats taking a free ride with their
families. Even take the case of Goa where the govt. runs hotels in
margao, panjim, mapuca, colva and calangute-all loss making, and
still the govt. has only recently sunk a huge amount of money in
renovating them.Why, you may ask? Simple- rooms are subsidised for
Govt employees, and politicians! The corruption which continues is
mind boggling. The socialist lessons of the soviet union are
difficult to give up, believe me.
regards, Gilbert.
Cecil Pinto
2003-08-09 09:44:31 UTC
Permalink
Love and longing in Mumbai?s Jazz Age (Part 1 of 3 Parts)
by Naresh Fernandes - MansWorld magazine July 2003



For over five decades, well into the late 1960s before prohibition,
taxation and rock-and-roll killed it, Mumbai boasted of one of the most
vibrant jazz scenes in the world, outside of the US. On Churchgate Street,
stretching from the Marine Drive sea front all the way up to Flora
Fountain the sound of jazz spilled out through the doors of packed night
clubs like Ambassador, Napoli, The Talk of the Town, Gaylord?s, Ritz,
Little Hut, Bistro and Volga. Not to speak of the Rendezvous at the Taj.
The legendary pianist and composer Dave Brubeck was impressed enough by the
local musicians to attempt to make some recordings during one of his
visits. Set against this backdrop is the tragic love affair of tenor
saxophonist and band leader Chris Perry and singer Lorna Cordeiro. Naresh
Fernandes tells their story for the first time.


---------


Their eyes give it away. Chris Perry wears a slick black jacket, the
sleeves of his crisp white shirt revealing the glint of dark cuff links.
His fingers clasp a gleaming tenor saxophone with a lover?s
gentleness. Arms crossed coquettishly above her waist, Lorna Cordeiro is
chic in a bouffant and a form-fitting gown that shows a flash of ankle.
They stare into each other?s eyes, mesmerised. Behind them looms a giant
camera aperture borrowed from the opening sequence of the Bond films.

You couldn?t miss the poster as you sauntered down Jamshetji Tata Road in
downtown Bombay. It hung outside the Astoria Hotel, across the street from
the octagonal Art Deco turret of Eros cinema, inviting the city to Chris
and Lorna?s daily shows at the Venice nightclub. It was 1971. India was
savouring its newfound place on the world?s stage. The country?s armed
forces had decisively liberated Bangladesh and the idealism of Independence
had welled up again. India?s middle classes were capturing their polyester
memories on Agfa Click IIIs that cost 46.50 rupees (taxes extra), aspiring
to the lifestyles of ?The Jet Set Air Hostesses? described in The
Illustrated Weekly of India (price: 85 paise), and being encouraged by
newspaper ads to ?Go gay with Gaylord fine filter cigarettes?.

As the City of Gold bubbled through its jazz age, Lorna and Chris
enthralled Bombay with their shows at Venice each night. Remo Fernandes,
who would go on to become the first Indian pop musician to record an album
of original English-language tunes, was among those locked in the spell.
?Two artists sometimes ignite a creative chemistry in each other which goes
beyond all logical explanation. Mere mortals can only look and listen in
awe,? he rhapsodised. ?In such duos, one plus one does not make two. It
makes a number so immeasurable, it defies all laws of calculus.?

But the sparks that flew at Venice gradually built into a roaring
conflagration. As Remo put it: ?Hyper-intense, high-temperament artistic
relationships often end in emotional disaster, like two comets when they
steer too dangerously close. Chris?s and Lorna?s, as we all know, was no
exception.?

Like the myths about the city in which they soared to fame, the tale of
Chris and Lorna has gained so much in the re-telling it?s sometimes
difficult to thresh the apocrypha from the actual. Thirty years after the
two stopped performing together, old-time musicians in the bylanes of Dhobi
Talao and Bandra still beg anonymity as they reminisce in sad whispers.

?He was shameless. He left his wife and three small children for that girl.?

?Chris and Lorna were in love. When they fought, they became mortal
enemies. He destroyed her and he destroyed himself.?

?She was very good singer. Beyond that, she was nothing. She got her break
with Chris Perry. He made contract with her. She couldn?t sing without his
permission. She had no brains, so she signed. Then he went back to his wife.?

?He didn?t let her perform with anyone else. He threatened to break the
legs of one Hindu fellow who tried to get her to sing with him.?

?She hit the bottle, men. She became an alcoholic and just disappeared.?

Chris Perry who was born Pereira died on January 25, 2002, his last years
hobbled by Parkinson?s disease. Lorna has refused to recount her version of
events for publication. But the fidelity of her contralto booming out of
our speakers, embroidered with Chris?s perfectly crafted sax filigrees,
speaks its own truth.


Ronnie Monserrate was 19 when he began to play Sunday gigs at Venice with
the Chris Perry band, sitting in for the regular pianist. Venice had a
reputation. It was the jazzman?s jazz haunt, the rendezvous for musicians
from around the country and occasionally from around the world. Dave
Brubeck swung by when he visited Bombay in 1958, as Duke Ellington had when
his band set out on their famous world tour of 1963. As Ronnie tells it,
the dapper Chris Perry was the musician?s musician: ?He had perfect pitch.
He was an arranger, a composer, a player.? Chris played both trumpet and
saxophone, sometimes switching from one to the other mid-tune, a feat that
required elaborate lip control. His trumpet tone was broad and true. He
didn?t have flashy technique, but the notes he coaxed out of his horn had a
mellowness that kept the fans coming back night after night.

Chris was 43 at the time, Lorna was 25. No one seems quite sure exactly how
they met, but everyone?s agreed that he groomed her into one of the
Bombay?s finest crooners. One version maintains that Lorna got her break
when still in school, after she won the Connie Francis soundalike
competition at Metro cinema. This prompted a musician named Raymond
Albuqerque to invite her to sing in his show at the Bandra Fair. Her
rendition of Underneath the Mango Tree got the crowds so fired up that
Chris Perry, already an established performer, went to her home to audition
her. She was just 16 when she joined Perry?s band.

A vocalist in the Shirley Bassey mould, Lorna belted out every tune like it
was her last time on stage. ?She had a lot of black feel,? is how Ronnie
describes her performances. ?You could see the intensity when she was on
stage. She?d give it her best, every time. She was like a magnet. You
couldn?t help but be attracted to her when she was on stage. And with Chris
Perry band by her side, it was like magic happening. There was incredible
attraction. There was a lot of love in the interaction. It was apparent in
their body language. They brought out the best in each other. They?d look
into each other?s eyes and their understanding was so great that there?d be
spontaneous combustion.?

Offstage, though, things could get awkward. Any man attempting to talk to
Lorna was liable to get a taste of Perry?s famously volatile fists. During
breaks, the musicians would sit around their table, absolutely silent.
?They were jolly people but they were afraid to laugh around Chris,? Ronnie
says. Ronnie was the only exception, perhaps because his youth made him
seem unthreatening. Two decades later, he?d find opportunity to call in
that bond of trust.

Venice was around the corner from Bombay?s swinging jazz strip, Churchgate
Street (now Veer Nariman Road). Pianists, trios and quartets were to be
heard all the way down the 200-metre thoroughfare as it led off from
Churchgate station to the Arabian Sea. First came Berry?s, with tandoori
butter chicken that was the stuff of Bombay legend and accomplished
piano-fronted groups led by Dorothy Jones and Stanley Pinto. Across the
fence was Bombelli?s, named after its Swiss owner, where a trio held sway
as ad men sipped cappuccinos. Then came the Ambassador, where Toni Pinto?s
quintet encapsulated Bombay?s diversity: the group had two Jews a singer
named Ephrim Elias and drummer Abie Cohen, an Anglo-Indian tenor
saxophonist named Norman Mobsby, and, in addition to Pinto, another Goan,
the bassist Clement Furtado.

Pinto?s kingdom was named the Other Room, so called because after the rich
and famous had finished drinking at the bar, they?d say, ?Let?s go to the
other room.? He ruled for 16 years from 1958, his sharply dressed group
spinning out hard-driving bop and light classics, and playing back-up for
cabarets and visiting acrobats, magicians and flamenco dancers. The
Ambassador was owned by the cigar-chomping Jack Voyantzis, an ebullient
Greek who was assisted by his brother, Socrates. The siblings had started
their subcontinental journey in Rangoon, opened a caf? in Delhi, and
finally found their way to Bombay, where they transformed a hotel known as
the Argentinian into the Ambassador. The cream of Bombay society turned out
to catch Toni?s tightly-rehearsed band. Toni remembers once looking up from
his piano to see three of the city?s leading editors appreciatively tapping
their feet: Rusi Karanjia, editor of the left-wing tabloid Blitz, D F
Karaka, editor of the rival Current, and Frank Moraes, editor of the Indian
Express, with his American girlfriend. Another time, as the band was going
through its routine, Toni realised that someone from the back of the room
was playing along on a trumpet. It turned out to be American hornman Eddie
Calvert. ?He came for dinner one night even though he was staying at the
Ritz,? Toni says, and he asked his drummer, Bobby Hadrian, to go back and
get his instrument. Calvert and Toni?s band jammed for an hour, playing
the tunes the American had made famous: Cherry Pink, Begin the Beguine,
Wonderland by Night.

Elsewhere on Churchgate Street, music spilled out through the doors of the
Napoli, The Talk of the Town and Gaylord?s. Opposite Venice, there was jazz
at the Ritz, while at the Little Hut, Neville Thomas led a group calling
itself Three Guys and a Doll. Past Flora Fountain stood Bistro and Volga,
home to a quartet led by the grandfatherly baritone saxophonist Hecke
Kingdom.

Dave Brubeck was impressed enough by the local musicians to attempt to make
some recordings with them during his visit. But Bombay defeated him. He
later recounted the episode to an interviewer: ?The current fluctuated in
Bombay in those days and so the tape would speed up and slow down. Like,
when you were shaving, the speed of the motor would go up and down. It
ruined one of my favourite tapes I've ever made.? Another visiting jazzman,
the pianist Hampton Hawes, was overwhelmed by problems that were rather
more basic. ?Bombay turned me around,? he wrote. ?I?d never seen poverty
before.? Art, he decided, was irrelevant amidst the gnawing deprivation.
?Here I was thinking about making a big splash, a hit record, going home a
hero, and I?m walking the streets with motherfuckers who don?t even know
what a piece of bread is, let along Stravinsky or Charlie Parker. If Bird
was alive and played for them they wouldn?t be able to hear him because
they?d be too damn hungry.?

Admittedly, jazz had always been the preserve of Bombay?s elite. But while
the audiences were upper crust, the musicians who cooked up the syncopated
rhythms were not. Like Toni Pinto, Ronnie Monserrate, Chris and Lorna, the
majority were Roman Catholics strivers from the former Portuguese colony of
Goa, 550 kilometres south of Bombay. They?d been an important part of the
Bombay music scene since the 1920s, when Bombay began to develop its
appetite for what was then called ?hot music?. Jazz had made its way from
New Orleans in the waxy grooves of phonograph records and travelled over
the oceans with touring American bands that played for the administrators
of the Raj. Bombay?s first jazz concerts were performed at the Bandstand,
south of the Oval. Among the earliest jazzmen to play an extended stint in
Bombay was Leon Abbey, a violinist from Minnesota, who led an eight-piece
band at the Taj during the 1935-?36 season. Abbey wore white tails on stage
and played the freshest sounds. He told one interviewer, ?I kept up with
the latest numbers because someone would always come up to the bandstand
and say, ?Old Bean, would you play so and so
?, because as far as he was
concerned, we should know how to play everything that had ever been
written.? Midway through the trip, the Taj management sent Abbey and
saxophonist Art Lanier back to New York to pick up the latest music.

Abbey?s outfit was replaced by the Symphonians, fronted by the cornet
player Cricket Smith. Smith had been featured on the seminal recordings
made by James Reese Europe?s Society Orchestra in 1913 and 1914, capturing
jazz at the moment of its transition from the relatively unsophisticated
ragtime style. Smith ?signed his contract for a fixed amount of money and
two Coronas a day, so every day, the manager would have to bring him his
cigars?, recalls Luis Moreno, a Spanish trumpet player who lived in Bombay
for 20 years. ?He was a character.?

In 1938, pianist Teddy Weatherford, who had played with Louis Armstrong,
took the stage with his men. His swinging style and treble voicing had been
an important influence on jazz during its formative years. The Taj, it
would seem, wasn?t quite the genteel venue it now is not at least from
the way Weatherford?s occasional Russian bassist named ?Innocent Nick?
described the gigs to the jazz magazine Storyville. ?Teddy used to play
downstairs, in the Tavern of the Taj, for the soldiers, sailors and others,
a very rough place,? Nick said. ?Teddy would play for hours without a
break. Even with drinks, he would continue one-handed. He had tremendous
hands.?

For the African-American musicians, Bombay provided refuge from the
apartheid in the U.S. Men like Weatherford and his sidemen, such as the
saxophonist Roy Butler, spent long years shuttling between Europe and the
subcontinent, where racial barriers seemed non-existent, at least for them.
Butler?s years in India as a Weatherford sideman, he told Storyville, were
among his happiest the work was relatively easy, the pay and conditions
good, he was treated splendidly by both management and clientele, and
enjoyed the luxurious life under the British Raj. The Taj management, on
its part, honoured Weatherford by naming a dish after him: Poires Glace
Weatherford. (The absence of colour prejudice was only to be expected.
After all, industrial baron Jamshetji Tata was moved to build the Taj after
being prevented one leisurely Bombay evening from dining at the
Europeans-only Pyrke?s Apollo Hotel. Later, he famously hung a notice in
the Taj forbidding entry to South Africans and dogs.)

Weatherford?s sidemen were an eclectic lot and opened Bombay?s ears to a
wealth of new sounds, the Cuban drumming of Luis Pedroso and the Spanish
brass of Luis Moreno, among them. Butler, who was known as the Reverend in
acknowledgement of his abstemious ways, helped Weatherford drill the band.
Moreno characterised Butler as the ?gentleman of the orchestra?. Moreno
added, ?He never drank in his life and if someone said, ?How about a round
of drink?? Roy would say, ?I?ll have an ice-cream. You enjoy beer, I enjoy
ice-cream.? Butler went on to lead his own band at Greens, located where
the Taj Intercontinental now stands.

Both Weatherford (who married an Anglo-Indian woman, before dying of
cholera in Calcutta in 1945, aged 41) and Butler recruited Goan sidemen,
plugging Bombay into the source of jazz. The trumpet player Frank Fernand,
who played in Weatherford band with his Goan compatriots, Micky Correa and
Josique Menzies, says that his stint with the American taught him to ?play
like a negro?. Moreno helped Fernand develop the ability to hit long, high
notes, eventually extending his range up to E flat. Butler, it must be
noted, was less than thrilled with his Goan employees. ?My short stretch as
a bandleader in India was not too earth-shaking,? he told Storyville. ?The
local musicians were not too familiar with jazz at that time. I understood
that there are some very good jazzmen out there now, but the time was too
short for anything to develop, good or bad.? For their part, some of the
Goan musicians weren?t overly impressed with Butler, either. They believed
his decision to stay in India was motivated by the fear that he wouldn?t
find work in the US. As Fernand put it, ?The faltu fellows stayed, the good
ones went home.?





----
Continued in Part 2
----





This article in Word format was sent to me, on request, by the Editor of
MansWorld Magazine, N.Radhakrishnan, thus saving me the trouble of typing
it out. Please reciprocate his good gesture by visiting the site
http://www.mansworldindia.com


Cheers!

Cecil


====
Gilbert Lawrence
2003-08-09 16:57:01 UTC
Permalink
Hi all,

Great articles on the Goan culture in Bombay in the 1950-1970 and
beyond.
I do wish Bernard Colaco of ?UK / ?Macau and Constantino Xavier of
Portugal will read these articles and know about Goan culture and the
artists in the Bombay / Mumbai Diaspora. Regards, GL

-----Original Message-----
From: goanet-admin at goanet.org [mailto:goanet-admin at goanet.org] On Behalf
Of Cecil Pinto
Sent: Saturday, August 09, 2003 5:45 AM
To: Goa-Goans at yahoogroups.com; konkaniforum at yahoogroups.com
Cc: aldona-net at yahoogroups.com; goanet at goanet.org
Subject: [aldona-net] [Goanet]Chris & Lorna (Part 1) - by Naresh
Fernandes - MansWorld magazine July 2003

Love and longing in Mumbai?s Jazz Age (Part 1 of 3 Parts)
by Naresh Fernandes - MansWorld magazine July 2003



For over five decades, well into the late 1960s before prohibition,
taxation and rock-and-roll killed it, Mumbai boasted of one of the most
vibrant jazz scenes in the world, outside of the US. On Churchgate
Street,
stretching from the Marine Drive sea front all the way up to Flora
Fountain the sound of jazz spilled out through the doors of packed
night
clubs like Ambassador, Napoli, The Talk of the Town, Gaylord?s, Ritz,
Little Hut, Bistro and Volga. Not to speak of the Rendezvous at the Taj.

The legendary pianist and composer Dave Brubeck was impressed enough by
the
local musicians to attempt to make some recordings during one of his
visits. Set against this backdrop is the tragic love affair of tenor
saxophonist and band leader Chris Perry and singer Lorna Cordeiro.
Naresh
Fernandes tells their story for the first time.


---------


Their eyes give it away. Chris Perry wears a slick black jacket, the
sleeves of his crisp white shirt revealing the glint of dark cuff links.

His fingers clasp a gleaming tenor saxophone with a lover?s
gentleness. Arms crossed coquettishly above her waist, Lorna Cordeiro
is
chic in a bouffant and a form-fitting gown that shows a flash of ankle.
They stare into each other?s eyes, mesmerised. Behind them looms a giant

camera aperture borrowed from the opening sequence of the Bond films.

You couldn?t miss the poster as you sauntered down Jamshetji Tata Road
in
downtown Bombay. It hung outside the Astoria Hotel, across the street
from
the octagonal Art Deco turret of Eros cinema, inviting the city to Chris

and Lorna?s daily shows at the Venice nightclub. It was 1971. India was
savouring its newfound place on the world?s stage. The country?s armed
forces had decisively liberated Bangladesh and the idealism of
Independence
had welled up again. India?s middle classes were capturing their
polyester
memories on Agfa Click IIIs that cost 46.50 rupees (taxes extra),
aspiring
to the lifestyles of ?The Jet Set Air Hostesses? described in The
Illustrated Weekly of India (price: 85 paise), and being encouraged by
newspaper ads to ?Go gay with Gaylord fine filter cigarettes?.

As the City of Gold bubbled through its jazz age, Lorna and Chris
enthralled Bombay with their shows at Venice each night. Remo Fernandes,

who would go on to become the first Indian pop musician to record an
album
of original English-language tunes, was among those locked in the spell.

?Two artists sometimes ignite a creative chemistry in each other which
goes
beyond all logical explanation. Mere mortals can only look and listen in

awe,? he rhapsodised. ?In such duos, one plus one does not make two. It
makes a number so immeasurable, it defies all laws of calculus.?

But the sparks that flew at Venice gradually built into a roaring
conflagration. As Remo put it: ?Hyper-intense, high-temperament artistic

relationships often end in emotional disaster, like two comets when they

steer too dangerously close. Chris?s and Lorna?s, as we all know, was no

exception.?

Like the myths about the city in which they soared to fame, the tale of
Chris and Lorna has gained so much in the re-telling it?s sometimes
difficult to thresh the apocrypha from the actual. Thirty years after
the
two stopped performing together, old-time musicians in the bylanes of
Dhobi
Talao and Bandra still beg anonymity as they reminisce in sad whispers.

?He was shameless. He left his wife and three small children for that
girl.?

?Chris and Lorna were in love. When they fought, they became mortal
enemies. He destroyed her and he destroyed himself.?

?She was very good singer. Beyond that, she was nothing. She got her
break
with Chris Perry. He made contract with her. She couldn?t sing without
his
permission. She had no brains, so she signed. Then he went back to his
wife.?

?He didn?t let her perform with anyone else. He threatened to break the
legs of one Hindu fellow who tried to get her to sing with him.?

?She hit the bottle, men. She became an alcoholic and just disappeared.?

Chris Perry who was born Pereira died on January 25, 2002, his last
years
hobbled by Parkinson?s disease. Lorna has refused to recount her version
of
events for publication. But the fidelity of her contralto booming out of

our speakers, embroidered with Chris?s perfectly crafted sax filigrees,
speaks its own truth.


Ronnie Monserrate was 19 when he began to play Sunday gigs at Venice
with
the Chris Perry band, sitting in for the regular pianist. Venice had a
reputation. It was the jazzman?s jazz haunt, the rendezvous for
musicians
from around the country and occasionally from around the world. Dave
Brubeck swung by when he visited Bombay in 1958, as Duke Ellington had
when
his band set out on their famous world tour of 1963. As Ronnie tells it,

the dapper Chris Perry was the musician?s musician: ?He had perfect
pitch.
He was an arranger, a composer, a player.? Chris played both trumpet and

saxophone, sometimes switching from one to the other mid-tune, a feat
that
required elaborate lip control. His trumpet tone was broad and true. He
didn?t have flashy technique, but the notes he coaxed out of his horn
had a
mellowness that kept the fans coming back night after night.

Chris was 43 at the time, Lorna was 25. No one seems quite sure exactly
how
they met, but everyone?s agreed that he groomed her into one of the
Bombay?s finest crooners. One version maintains that Lorna got her break

when still in school, after she won the Connie Francis soundalike
competition at Metro cinema. This prompted a musician named Raymond
Albuqerque to invite her to sing in his show at the Bandra Fair. Her
rendition of Underneath the Mango Tree got the crowds so fired up that
Chris Perry, already an established performer, went to her home to
audition
her. She was just 16 when she joined Perry?s band.

A vocalist in the Shirley Bassey mould, Lorna belted out every tune like
it
was her last time on stage. ?She had a lot of black feel,? is how Ronnie

describes her performances. ?You could see the intensity when she was
on
stage. She?d give it her best, every time. She was like a magnet. You
couldn?t help but be attracted to her when she was on stage. And with
Chris
Perry band by her side, it was like magic happening. There was
incredible
attraction. There was a lot of love in the interaction. It was apparent
in
their body language. They brought out the best in each other. They?d
look
into each other?s eyes and their understanding was so great that there?d
be
spontaneous combustion.?

Offstage, though, things could get awkward. Any man attempting to talk
to
Lorna was liable to get a taste of Perry?s famously volatile fists.
During
breaks, the musicians would sit around their table, absolutely silent.
?They were jolly people but they were afraid to laugh around Chris,?
Ronnie
says. Ronnie was the only exception, perhaps because his youth made him
seem unthreatening. Two decades later, he?d find opportunity to call in
that bond of trust.

Venice was around the corner from Bombay?s swinging jazz strip,
Churchgate
Street (now Veer Nariman Road). Pianists, trios and quartets were to be
heard all the way down the 200-metre thoroughfare as it led off from
Churchgate station to the Arabian Sea. First came Berry?s, with tandoori

butter chicken that was the stuff of Bombay legend and accomplished
piano-fronted groups led by Dorothy Jones and Stanley Pinto. Across the
fence was Bombelli?s, named after its Swiss owner, where a trio held
sway
as ad men sipped cappuccinos. Then came the Ambassador, where Toni
Pinto?s
quintet encapsulated Bombay?s diversity: the group had two Jews a
singer
named Ephrim Elias and drummer Abie Cohen, an Anglo-Indian tenor
saxophonist named Norman Mobsby, and, in addition to Pinto, another
Goan,
the bassist Clement Furtado.

Pinto?s kingdom was named the Other Room, so called because after the
rich
and famous had finished drinking at the bar, they?d say, ?Let?s go to
the
other room.? He ruled for 16 years from 1958, his sharply dressed group
spinning out hard-driving bop and light classics, and playing back-up
for
cabarets and visiting acrobats, magicians and flamenco dancers. The
Ambassador was owned by the cigar-chomping Jack Voyantzis, an ebullient
Greek who was assisted by his brother, Socrates. The siblings had
started
their subcontinental journey in Rangoon, opened a caf? in Delhi, and
finally found their way to Bombay, where they transformed a hotel known
as
the Argentinian into the Ambassador. The cream of Bombay society turned
out
to catch Toni?s tightly-rehearsed band. Toni remembers once looking up
from
his piano to see three of the city?s leading editors appreciatively
tapping
their feet: Rusi Karanjia, editor of the left-wing tabloid Blitz, D F
Karaka, editor of the rival Current, and Frank Moraes, editor of the
Indian
Express, with his American girlfriend. Another time, as the band was
going
through its routine, Toni realised that someone from the back of the
room
was playing along on a trumpet. It turned out to be American hornman
Eddie
Calvert. ?He came for dinner one night even though he was staying at the

Ritz,? Toni says, and he asked his drummer, Bobby Hadrian, to go back
and
get his instrument. Calvert and Toni?s band jammed for an hour, playing

the tunes the American had made famous: Cherry Pink, Begin the Beguine,
Wonderland by Night.

Elsewhere on Churchgate Street, music spilled out through the doors of
the
Napoli, The Talk of the Town and Gaylord?s. Opposite Venice, there was
jazz
at the Ritz, while at the Little Hut, Neville Thomas led a group calling

itself Three Guys and a Doll. Past Flora Fountain stood Bistro and
Volga,
home to a quartet led by the grandfatherly baritone saxophonist Hecke
Kingdom.

Dave Brubeck was impressed enough by the local musicians to attempt to
make
some recordings with them during his visit. But Bombay defeated him. He
later recounted the episode to an interviewer: ?The current fluctuated
in
Bombay in those days and so the tape would speed up and slow down. Like,

when you were shaving, the speed of the motor would go up and down. It
ruined one of my favourite tapes I've ever made.? Another visiting
jazzman,
the pianist Hampton Hawes, was overwhelmed by problems that were rather
more basic. ?Bombay turned me around,? he wrote. ?I?d never seen poverty

before.? Art, he decided, was irrelevant amidst the gnawing deprivation.

?Here I was thinking about making a big splash, a hit record, going home
a
hero, and I?m walking the streets with motherfuckers who don?t even know

what a piece of bread is, let along Stravinsky or Charlie Parker. If
Bird
was alive and played for them they wouldn?t be able to hear him because
they?d be too damn hungry.?

Admittedly, jazz had always been the preserve of Bombay?s elite. But
while
the audiences were upper crust, the musicians who cooked up the
syncopated
rhythms were not. Like Toni Pinto, Ronnie Monserrate, Chris and Lorna,
the
majority were Roman Catholics strivers from the former Portuguese colony
of
Goa, 550 kilometres south of Bombay. They?d been an important part of
the
Bombay music scene since the 1920s, when Bombay began to develop its
appetite for what was then called ?hot music?. Jazz had made its way
from
New Orleans in the waxy grooves of phonograph records and travelled over

the oceans with touring American bands that played for the
administrators
of the Raj. Bombay?s first jazz concerts were performed at the
Bandstand,
south of the Oval. Among the earliest jazzmen to play an extended stint
in
Bombay was Leon Abbey, a violinist from Minnesota, who led an
eight-piece
band at the Taj during the 1935-?36 season. Abbey wore white tails on
stage
and played the freshest sounds. He told one interviewer, ?I kept up with

the latest numbers because someone would always come up to the bandstand

and say, ?Old Bean, would you play so and so
?, because as far as he was

concerned, we should know how to play everything that had ever been
written.? Midway through the trip, the Taj management sent Abbey and
saxophonist Art Lanier back to New York to pick up the latest music.

Abbey?s outfit was replaced by the Symphonians, fronted by the cornet
player Cricket Smith. Smith had been featured on the seminal recordings
made by James Reese Europe?s Society Orchestra in 1913 and 1914,
capturing
jazz at the moment of its transition from the relatively unsophisticated

ragtime style. Smith ?signed his contract for a fixed amount of money
and
two Coronas a day, so every day, the manager would have to bring him his

cigars?, recalls Luis Moreno, a Spanish trumpet player who lived in
Bombay
for 20 years. ?He was a character.?

In 1938, pianist Teddy Weatherford, who had played with Louis Armstrong,

took the stage with his men. His swinging style and treble voicing had
been
an important influence on jazz during its formative years. The Taj, it
would seem, wasn?t quite the genteel venue it now is not at least from

the way Weatherford?s occasional Russian bassist named ?Innocent Nick?
described the gigs to the jazz magazine Storyville. ?Teddy used to play
downstairs, in the Tavern of the Taj, for the soldiers, sailors and
others,
a very rough place,? Nick said. ?Teddy would play for hours without a
break. Even with drinks, he would continue one-handed. He had tremendous

hands.?

For the African-American musicians, Bombay provided refuge from the
apartheid in the U.S. Men like Weatherford and his sidemen, such as the
saxophonist Roy Butler, spent long years shuttling between Europe and
the
subcontinent, where racial barriers seemed non-existent, at least for
them.
Butler?s years in India as a Weatherford sideman, he told Storyville,
were
among his happiest the work was relatively easy, the pay and conditions

good, he was treated splendidly by both management and clientele, and
enjoyed the luxurious life under the British Raj. The Taj management, on

its part, honoured Weatherford by naming a dish after him: Poires Glace
Weatherford. (The absence of colour prejudice was only to be expected.
After all, industrial baron Jamshetji Tata was moved to build the Taj
after
being prevented one leisurely Bombay evening from dining at the
Europeans-only Pyrke?s Apollo Hotel. Later, he famously hung a notice in

the Taj forbidding entry to South Africans and dogs.)

Weatherford?s sidemen were an eclectic lot and opened Bombay?s ears to a

wealth of new sounds, the Cuban drumming of Luis Pedroso and the Spanish

brass of Luis Moreno, among them. Butler, who was known as the Reverend
in
acknowledgement of his abstemious ways, helped Weatherford drill the
band.
Moreno characterised Butler as the ?gentleman of the orchestra?. Moreno
added, ?He never drank in his life and if someone said, ?How about a
round
of drink?? Roy would say, ?I?ll have an ice-cream. You enjoy beer, I
enjoy
ice-cream.? Butler went on to lead his own band at Greens, located where

the Taj Intercontinental now stands.

Both Weatherford (who married an Anglo-Indian woman, before dying of
cholera in Calcutta in 1945, aged 41) and Butler recruited Goan sidemen,

plugging Bombay into the source of jazz. The trumpet player Frank
Fernand,
who played in Weatherford band with his Goan compatriots, Micky Correa
and
Josique Menzies, says that his stint with the American taught him to
?play
like a negro?. Moreno helped Fernand develop the ability to hit long,
high
notes, eventually extending his range up to E flat. Butler, it must be
noted, was less than thrilled with his Goan employees. ?My short stretch
as
a bandleader in India was not too earth-shaking,? he told Storyville.
?The
local musicians were not too familiar with jazz at that time. I
understood
that there are some very good jazzmen out there now, but the time was
too
short for anything to develop, good or bad.? For their part, some of the

Goan musicians weren?t overly impressed with Butler, either. They
believed
his decision to stay in India was motivated by the fear that he wouldn?t

find work in the US. As Fernand put it, ?The faltu fellows stayed, the
good
ones went home.?





----
Continued in Part 2
----





This article in Word format was sent to me, on request, by the Editor of

MansWorld Magazine, N.Radhakrishnan, thus saving me the trouble of
typing
it out. Please reciprocate his good gesture by visiting the site
http://www.mansworldindia.com


Cheers!

Cecil


====



########################################################################
##
# Send submissions for Goanet to goanet at goanet.org
#
# PLEASE remember to stay on-topic (related to Goa), and avoid top-posts
#
# More details on Goanet at http://joingoanet.shorturl.com/
#
# Please keep your discussion/tone polite, to reflect respect to others
#
########################################################################
##

------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor ---------------------~-->
Low on Ink? Get 80% off inkjet cartridges & Free Shipping at
77Colors.com.
We have your brand: HP, Epson, Lexmark, Canon, Compaq and more!
http://www.c1tracking.com/l.asp?cid=5981
http://us.click.yahoo.com/DmnqpB/IyhGAA/ySSFAA/8XQrlB/TM
---------------------------------------------------------------------~->

To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
aldona-net-unsubscribe at yahoogroups.com



Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
Bernado Colaco
2003-08-10 03:49:37 UTC
Permalink
I wonder when Jazz music coming from capitalism was a
part of Goan culture? Ok, Sodam chintalim vehtelem
munon.... was a class act!

Cola?o
Post by Gilbert Lawrence
Hi all,
Great articles on the Goan culture in Bombay in the
1950-1970 and
beyond.
I do wish Bernard Colaco of ?UK / ?Macau and
Constantino Xavier of
Portugal will read these articles and know about
Goan culture and the
artists in the Bombay / Mumbai Diaspora. Regards, GL
===
__________________________________________________
Yahoo! Plus - For a better Internet experience
http://uk.promotions.yahoo.com/yplus/yoffer.html
Gabe Menezes
2003-08-10 17:22:05 UTC
Permalink
Sent: Saturday, August 09, 2003 10:44 AM
Subject: [Goanet]Chris & Lorna (Part 1) - by Naresh Fernandes - MansWorld
magazine July 2003


Love and longing in Mumbai's Jazz Age (Part 1 of 3 Parts)
by Naresh Fernandes - MansWorld magazine July 2003


RESPONSE:

A fantastically written article which not only sheds light on Chris Perry's
and Lorna's story but which also tells us about Bombay's famous jazz of
years gone by. To boot, it gives a history lesson on the migration of Goans
to Bombay and their occupations.

My father was born in Chadan Waddi (Dhobi Thalao). It was from here that he
emigrated as a young man to Nairobi, Kenya. The story goes that he was
always reminiscing about Bombay, so much so that he got given the nick name
Bomboikar. He is dead and gone now. If any one want to know my back ground
from Kenya I only have to tell them that I am Bomboikar's son and
immediately they know where I come from !

Cheers,

Gabe

Continue reading on narkive:
Loading...