Discussion:
[Goanet]Full day school in Goa, makes sense?
Percy Ferrao
2005-05-20 18:16:23 UTC
Permalink
The decision of the Goa Governor, S.C. Jamir, to implement full day school
for students beginning this academic year stating that it will improve the
overall development of the student is hasty and unjustified.

Full day schools in other states of India may be acceptable due to the
infrastructure in place. However, the infrastructure and transport
situation is chaotic in Goa the present time. The main reason why Goa is
among the three most literate states in India, are that in Goa the standard
of teaching is high and there are strong bonds between the teachers and
students. Why then, do we need to stretch the overall amount of teaching
time.

The Governor, before deciding to implement the full day scheme, should have
first checked if the teachers are mentally and physically equipped for the
task. He should have surveyed the schools to see if they had the
infrastructure to carry out full day school.

In particular, canteens, toilets, clean drinking water and recreational
facilities should have been assessed. We have to also consider the monsoon
and heat factors. Would children be able to concentrate in the afternoon
heat ? Give our teachers a break, they too are human and need to recharge
their batteries as they are working in a very stressful environment.

Since the late sixties, Education in Goa has been going through a
metamorphosis witnessed in no other state in India -- English replacing
Portuguese, later on Hindi made a compulsory , S.S.C.L. being replaced by
the higher secondary board, the scrapping of English in primary schools (the
biggest error, now accounting for high number of school drop-outs), raising
the age bar for admission into school and the plans of the dismissed
Parrikar government to make major changes in the education pattern after
standard eight.

Its to the credit of the teachers and students that they have 'adapted' so
well to these changes whilst still keeping Goa among the top three literate
states in India. Nevertheless, all these changes may have had some slight
detrimental effect on the quality of teaching and the performance of the
students, as our literacy levels which were nearly 90% in the 1990 census
remain the same even after a period of fifteen years. There has been no
explanation for this from our Education Ministers and Politicians as to why
we haven't yet achieved 100% literacy.

In fact, persuading the Goa Governor to implement full day school could
perhaps be the idea of the caterers and retailers, who see this as an golden
opportunity to expand their businesses, but can the Governor guarantee the
quality of the school mid-day meals? If developed countries in Europe are
having to deal with junk mid day school meals, food poisoning, obesity and
spread of various diseases most commonly diabetes type 2 not to forget
bullying what do we expect from our state government, where worms are even
found in drinking water supplied to homes.

Full day school could be implemented to counter the growing number of
coaching classes in our state. I support the coaching classes because some
students fall behind or do not fully understand their teachers. Moreover
these classes are not free, and if students wish to pay and improve their
skills, I don't see why they shouldn't have the advantage of coaching
classes, so many have gained by them.


Percy Ferrao
Navelim, Salcete,Goa
Email percyferrao at yahoo.com
Percy Ferrao
2005-05-20 18:16:23 UTC
Permalink
The decision of the Goa Governor, S.C. Jamir, to implement full day school
for students beginning this academic year stating that it will improve the
overall development of the student is hasty and unjustified.

Full day schools in other states of India may be acceptable due to the
infrastructure in place. However, the infrastructure and transport
situation is chaotic in Goa the present time. The main reason why Goa is
among the three most literate states in India, are that in Goa the standard
of teaching is high and there are strong bonds between the teachers and
students. Why then, do we need to stretch the overall amount of teaching
time.

The Governor, before deciding to implement the full day scheme, should have
first checked if the teachers are mentally and physically equipped for the
task. He should have surveyed the schools to see if they had the
infrastructure to carry out full day school.

In particular, canteens, toilets, clean drinking water and recreational
facilities should have been assessed. We have to also consider the monsoon
and heat factors. Would children be able to concentrate in the afternoon
heat ? Give our teachers a break, they too are human and need to recharge
their batteries as they are working in a very stressful environment.

Since the late sixties, Education in Goa has been going through a
metamorphosis witnessed in no other state in India -- English replacing
Portuguese, later on Hindi made a compulsory , S.S.C.L. being replaced by
the higher secondary board, the scrapping of English in primary schools (the
biggest error, now accounting for high number of school drop-outs), raising
the age bar for admission into school and the plans of the dismissed
Parrikar government to make major changes in the education pattern after
standard eight.

Its to the credit of the teachers and students that they have 'adapted' so
well to these changes whilst still keeping Goa among the top three literate
states in India. Nevertheless, all these changes may have had some slight
detrimental effect on the quality of teaching and the performance of the
students, as our literacy levels which were nearly 90% in the 1990 census
remain the same even after a period of fifteen years. There has been no
explanation for this from our Education Ministers and Politicians as to why
we haven't yet achieved 100% literacy.

In fact, persuading the Goa Governor to implement full day school could
perhaps be the idea of the caterers and retailers, who see this as an golden
opportunity to expand their businesses, but can the Governor guarantee the
quality of the school mid-day meals? If developed countries in Europe are
having to deal with junk mid day school meals, food poisoning, obesity and
spread of various diseases most commonly diabetes type 2 not to forget
bullying what do we expect from our state government, where worms are even
found in drinking water supplied to homes.

Full day school could be implemented to counter the growing number of
coaching classes in our state. I support the coaching classes because some
students fall behind or do not fully understand their teachers. Moreover
these classes are not free, and if students wish to pay and improve their
skills, I don't see why they shouldn't have the advantage of coaching
classes, so many have gained by them.


Percy Ferrao
Navelim, Salcete,Goa
Email percyferrao at yahoo.com
Percy Ferrao
2005-05-20 18:16:23 UTC
Permalink
The decision of the Goa Governor, S.C. Jamir, to implement full day school
for students beginning this academic year stating that it will improve the
overall development of the student is hasty and unjustified.

Full day schools in other states of India may be acceptable due to the
infrastructure in place. However, the infrastructure and transport
situation is chaotic in Goa the present time. The main reason why Goa is
among the three most literate states in India, are that in Goa the standard
of teaching is high and there are strong bonds between the teachers and
students. Why then, do we need to stretch the overall amount of teaching
time.

The Governor, before deciding to implement the full day scheme, should have
first checked if the teachers are mentally and physically equipped for the
task. He should have surveyed the schools to see if they had the
infrastructure to carry out full day school.

In particular, canteens, toilets, clean drinking water and recreational
facilities should have been assessed. We have to also consider the monsoon
and heat factors. Would children be able to concentrate in the afternoon
heat ? Give our teachers a break, they too are human and need to recharge
their batteries as they are working in a very stressful environment.

Since the late sixties, Education in Goa has been going through a
metamorphosis witnessed in no other state in India -- English replacing
Portuguese, later on Hindi made a compulsory , S.S.C.L. being replaced by
the higher secondary board, the scrapping of English in primary schools (the
biggest error, now accounting for high number of school drop-outs), raising
the age bar for admission into school and the plans of the dismissed
Parrikar government to make major changes in the education pattern after
standard eight.

Its to the credit of the teachers and students that they have 'adapted' so
well to these changes whilst still keeping Goa among the top three literate
states in India. Nevertheless, all these changes may have had some slight
detrimental effect on the quality of teaching and the performance of the
students, as our literacy levels which were nearly 90% in the 1990 census
remain the same even after a period of fifteen years. There has been no
explanation for this from our Education Ministers and Politicians as to why
we haven't yet achieved 100% literacy.

In fact, persuading the Goa Governor to implement full day school could
perhaps be the idea of the caterers and retailers, who see this as an golden
opportunity to expand their businesses, but can the Governor guarantee the
quality of the school mid-day meals? If developed countries in Europe are
having to deal with junk mid day school meals, food poisoning, obesity and
spread of various diseases most commonly diabetes type 2 not to forget
bullying what do we expect from our state government, where worms are even
found in drinking water supplied to homes.

Full day school could be implemented to counter the growing number of
coaching classes in our state. I support the coaching classes because some
students fall behind or do not fully understand their teachers. Moreover
these classes are not free, and if students wish to pay and improve their
skills, I don't see why they shouldn't have the advantage of coaching
classes, so many have gained by them.


Percy Ferrao
Navelim, Salcete,Goa
Email percyferrao at yahoo.com
Percy Ferrao
2005-05-20 18:16:23 UTC
Permalink
The decision of the Goa Governor, S.C. Jamir, to implement full day school
for students beginning this academic year stating that it will improve the
overall development of the student is hasty and unjustified.

Full day schools in other states of India may be acceptable due to the
infrastructure in place. However, the infrastructure and transport
situation is chaotic in Goa the present time. The main reason why Goa is
among the three most literate states in India, are that in Goa the standard
of teaching is high and there are strong bonds between the teachers and
students. Why then, do we need to stretch the overall amount of teaching
time.

The Governor, before deciding to implement the full day scheme, should have
first checked if the teachers are mentally and physically equipped for the
task. He should have surveyed the schools to see if they had the
infrastructure to carry out full day school.

In particular, canteens, toilets, clean drinking water and recreational
facilities should have been assessed. We have to also consider the monsoon
and heat factors. Would children be able to concentrate in the afternoon
heat ? Give our teachers a break, they too are human and need to recharge
their batteries as they are working in a very stressful environment.

Since the late sixties, Education in Goa has been going through a
metamorphosis witnessed in no other state in India -- English replacing
Portuguese, later on Hindi made a compulsory , S.S.C.L. being replaced by
the higher secondary board, the scrapping of English in primary schools (the
biggest error, now accounting for high number of school drop-outs), raising
the age bar for admission into school and the plans of the dismissed
Parrikar government to make major changes in the education pattern after
standard eight.

Its to the credit of the teachers and students that they have 'adapted' so
well to these changes whilst still keeping Goa among the top three literate
states in India. Nevertheless, all these changes may have had some slight
detrimental effect on the quality of teaching and the performance of the
students, as our literacy levels which were nearly 90% in the 1990 census
remain the same even after a period of fifteen years. There has been no
explanation for this from our Education Ministers and Politicians as to why
we haven't yet achieved 100% literacy.

In fact, persuading the Goa Governor to implement full day school could
perhaps be the idea of the caterers and retailers, who see this as an golden
opportunity to expand their businesses, but can the Governor guarantee the
quality of the school mid-day meals? If developed countries in Europe are
having to deal with junk mid day school meals, food poisoning, obesity and
spread of various diseases most commonly diabetes type 2 not to forget
bullying what do we expect from our state government, where worms are even
found in drinking water supplied to homes.

Full day school could be implemented to counter the growing number of
coaching classes in our state. I support the coaching classes because some
students fall behind or do not fully understand their teachers. Moreover
these classes are not free, and if students wish to pay and improve their
skills, I don't see why they shouldn't have the advantage of coaching
classes, so many have gained by them.


Percy Ferrao
Navelim, Salcete,Goa
Email percyferrao at yahoo.com
Percy Ferrao
2005-05-20 18:16:23 UTC
Permalink
The decision of the Goa Governor, S.C. Jamir, to implement full day school
for students beginning this academic year stating that it will improve the
overall development of the student is hasty and unjustified.

Full day schools in other states of India may be acceptable due to the
infrastructure in place. However, the infrastructure and transport
situation is chaotic in Goa the present time. The main reason why Goa is
among the three most literate states in India, are that in Goa the standard
of teaching is high and there are strong bonds between the teachers and
students. Why then, do we need to stretch the overall amount of teaching
time.

The Governor, before deciding to implement the full day scheme, should have
first checked if the teachers are mentally and physically equipped for the
task. He should have surveyed the schools to see if they had the
infrastructure to carry out full day school.

In particular, canteens, toilets, clean drinking water and recreational
facilities should have been assessed. We have to also consider the monsoon
and heat factors. Would children be able to concentrate in the afternoon
heat ? Give our teachers a break, they too are human and need to recharge
their batteries as they are working in a very stressful environment.

Since the late sixties, Education in Goa has been going through a
metamorphosis witnessed in no other state in India -- English replacing
Portuguese, later on Hindi made a compulsory , S.S.C.L. being replaced by
the higher secondary board, the scrapping of English in primary schools (the
biggest error, now accounting for high number of school drop-outs), raising
the age bar for admission into school and the plans of the dismissed
Parrikar government to make major changes in the education pattern after
standard eight.

Its to the credit of the teachers and students that they have 'adapted' so
well to these changes whilst still keeping Goa among the top three literate
states in India. Nevertheless, all these changes may have had some slight
detrimental effect on the quality of teaching and the performance of the
students, as our literacy levels which were nearly 90% in the 1990 census
remain the same even after a period of fifteen years. There has been no
explanation for this from our Education Ministers and Politicians as to why
we haven't yet achieved 100% literacy.

In fact, persuading the Goa Governor to implement full day school could
perhaps be the idea of the caterers and retailers, who see this as an golden
opportunity to expand their businesses, but can the Governor guarantee the
quality of the school mid-day meals? If developed countries in Europe are
having to deal with junk mid day school meals, food poisoning, obesity and
spread of various diseases most commonly diabetes type 2 not to forget
bullying what do we expect from our state government, where worms are even
found in drinking water supplied to homes.

Full day school could be implemented to counter the growing number of
coaching classes in our state. I support the coaching classes because some
students fall behind or do not fully understand their teachers. Moreover
these classes are not free, and if students wish to pay and improve their
skills, I don't see why they shouldn't have the advantage of coaching
classes, so many have gained by them.


Percy Ferrao
Navelim, Salcete,Goa
Email percyferrao at yahoo.com
Percy Ferrao
2005-05-20 18:16:23 UTC
Permalink
The decision of the Goa Governor, S.C. Jamir, to implement full day school
for students beginning this academic year stating that it will improve the
overall development of the student is hasty and unjustified.

Full day schools in other states of India may be acceptable due to the
infrastructure in place. However, the infrastructure and transport
situation is chaotic in Goa the present time. The main reason why Goa is
among the three most literate states in India, are that in Goa the standard
of teaching is high and there are strong bonds between the teachers and
students. Why then, do we need to stretch the overall amount of teaching
time.

The Governor, before deciding to implement the full day scheme, should have
first checked if the teachers are mentally and physically equipped for the
task. He should have surveyed the schools to see if they had the
infrastructure to carry out full day school.

In particular, canteens, toilets, clean drinking water and recreational
facilities should have been assessed. We have to also consider the monsoon
and heat factors. Would children be able to concentrate in the afternoon
heat ? Give our teachers a break, they too are human and need to recharge
their batteries as they are working in a very stressful environment.

Since the late sixties, Education in Goa has been going through a
metamorphosis witnessed in no other state in India -- English replacing
Portuguese, later on Hindi made a compulsory , S.S.C.L. being replaced by
the higher secondary board, the scrapping of English in primary schools (the
biggest error, now accounting for high number of school drop-outs), raising
the age bar for admission into school and the plans of the dismissed
Parrikar government to make major changes in the education pattern after
standard eight.

Its to the credit of the teachers and students that they have 'adapted' so
well to these changes whilst still keeping Goa among the top three literate
states in India. Nevertheless, all these changes may have had some slight
detrimental effect on the quality of teaching and the performance of the
students, as our literacy levels which were nearly 90% in the 1990 census
remain the same even after a period of fifteen years. There has been no
explanation for this from our Education Ministers and Politicians as to why
we haven't yet achieved 100% literacy.

In fact, persuading the Goa Governor to implement full day school could
perhaps be the idea of the caterers and retailers, who see this as an golden
opportunity to expand their businesses, but can the Governor guarantee the
quality of the school mid-day meals? If developed countries in Europe are
having to deal with junk mid day school meals, food poisoning, obesity and
spread of various diseases most commonly diabetes type 2 not to forget
bullying what do we expect from our state government, where worms are even
found in drinking water supplied to homes.

Full day school could be implemented to counter the growing number of
coaching classes in our state. I support the coaching classes because some
students fall behind or do not fully understand their teachers. Moreover
these classes are not free, and if students wish to pay and improve their
skills, I don't see why they shouldn't have the advantage of coaching
classes, so many have gained by them.


Percy Ferrao
Navelim, Salcete,Goa
Email percyferrao at yahoo.com
Percy Ferrao
2005-05-20 18:16:23 UTC
Permalink
The decision of the Goa Governor, S.C. Jamir, to implement full day school
for students beginning this academic year stating that it will improve the
overall development of the student is hasty and unjustified.

Full day schools in other states of India may be acceptable due to the
infrastructure in place. However, the infrastructure and transport
situation is chaotic in Goa the present time. The main reason why Goa is
among the three most literate states in India, are that in Goa the standard
of teaching is high and there are strong bonds between the teachers and
students. Why then, do we need to stretch the overall amount of teaching
time.

The Governor, before deciding to implement the full day scheme, should have
first checked if the teachers are mentally and physically equipped for the
task. He should have surveyed the schools to see if they had the
infrastructure to carry out full day school.

In particular, canteens, toilets, clean drinking water and recreational
facilities should have been assessed. We have to also consider the monsoon
and heat factors. Would children be able to concentrate in the afternoon
heat ? Give our teachers a break, they too are human and need to recharge
their batteries as they are working in a very stressful environment.

Since the late sixties, Education in Goa has been going through a
metamorphosis witnessed in no other state in India -- English replacing
Portuguese, later on Hindi made a compulsory , S.S.C.L. being replaced by
the higher secondary board, the scrapping of English in primary schools (the
biggest error, now accounting for high number of school drop-outs), raising
the age bar for admission into school and the plans of the dismissed
Parrikar government to make major changes in the education pattern after
standard eight.

Its to the credit of the teachers and students that they have 'adapted' so
well to these changes whilst still keeping Goa among the top three literate
states in India. Nevertheless, all these changes may have had some slight
detrimental effect on the quality of teaching and the performance of the
students, as our literacy levels which were nearly 90% in the 1990 census
remain the same even after a period of fifteen years. There has been no
explanation for this from our Education Ministers and Politicians as to why
we haven't yet achieved 100% literacy.

In fact, persuading the Goa Governor to implement full day school could
perhaps be the idea of the caterers and retailers, who see this as an golden
opportunity to expand their businesses, but can the Governor guarantee the
quality of the school mid-day meals? If developed countries in Europe are
having to deal with junk mid day school meals, food poisoning, obesity and
spread of various diseases most commonly diabetes type 2 not to forget
bullying what do we expect from our state government, where worms are even
found in drinking water supplied to homes.

Full day school could be implemented to counter the growing number of
coaching classes in our state. I support the coaching classes because some
students fall behind or do not fully understand their teachers. Moreover
these classes are not free, and if students wish to pay and improve their
skills, I don't see why they shouldn't have the advantage of coaching
classes, so many have gained by them.


Percy Ferrao
Navelim, Salcete,Goa
Email percyferrao at yahoo.com

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