Discussion:
Life expectancy (Was: Virgin coconut oil...)
(too old to reply)
Bosco D
2009-12-06 04:28:44 UTC
Permalink
-----Original Message-----
From: Santosh Helekar
Hundred years ago the life expectancy of a human being in India was 25 years.
In 1947 .....Indians .....could only expect to live for 36 years.
In 1961 .....Indian citizen in Goa ..... could survive beyond 42 years of age
Today, any toddler in India can hope to live on an average for 70 years
RESPONSE: If you live(d) in Mumbai (formerly Bombay / Bombaim), where do/did you
live?

QTE
If you reside in Nana Chowk or Marine Lines, you can expect to live for about 20
years more than your friend in Chembur (E), 13 years more than the average Byculla
or Matunga resident, 10 years more than someone living in Santa Cruz and about seven
more years than the average person staying in Dadar.

TOI had earlier reported a study which had found that the average Mumbaikar was
likely to die at least seven years before other Indians and about 12 years before
people living in the rest of Maharashtra.

Bandra, the queen of the suburbs, had an average life expectancy of 57.96 but the
far western suburb of Borivli was better with 58.58 years. And Santa Cruz, only a
few kilometres away from Bandra, fared much worse with 50.19 years. In the congested
areas of Dadar and Parel, the average age life expectancy was found to be 53.95 and
46.41 years respectively.

END-QTE

Perhaps the data on Goa would be insightful considering the demographics are
'evolving'.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/mumbai/Expect-to-live-long-if-born-in-Nana-Chowk/articleshow/5298272.cms
Frederick Noronha
2009-12-06 10:24:23 UTC
Permalink
Most interesting. Does this have more to do with the progress of
Science in different parts of the city, the availability of
health-care (or the exclusion from it of certain segments of the
population) or economic disparity? Or a combination of one or more of
the above causes? Just curious... FN
Post by Bosco D
-----Original Message-----
From: Santosh Helekar
Hundred years ago the life expectancy of a human being in India was 25 years.
In 1947 .....Indians .....could only expect to live for 36 years.
In 1961 .....Indian citizen in Goa ..... could survive beyond 42 years of age
Today, any toddler in India can hope to live on an average for 70 years
RESPONSE: If you live(d) in Mumbai (formerly Bombay / Bombaim), where do/did you
live?
QTE
If you reside in Nana Chowk or Marine Lines, you can expect to live for about 20
years more than your friend in Chembur (E), 13 years more than the average Byculla
or Matunga resident, 10 years more than someone living in Santa Cruz and about seven
more years than the average person staying in Dadar....
TOI had earlier reported a study which had found that the average Mumbaikar was
likely to die at least seven years before other Indians and about 12 years before
people living in the rest of Maharashtra.
--
Frederick Noronha :: +91-832-2409490
ANOTHER GOA: http://tiny.cc/anothergoa
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/fredericknoronha
Writing, editing, alt.publishing, photography, journalism
Santosh Helekar
2009-12-06 20:52:42 UTC
Permalink
Can you elucidate me some as to how these drugs did get the OK in the >first place if the prio proven results were completely documented?
Dear Floriano,

Assuming that a regulatory agency is functioning optimally and responsibly, two reasons why a drug that got an approval initially might be withdrawn subsequently are as follows:

1. Detection of a rare adverse effect that was not caught in the clinical trials e.g. a one in 1000,000 chance of dying might not be caught in a scientific study involving 10,000 patients, and a study involving millions of patients would not be feasible.

2. Detection of an adverse effect that occurs only after decades long treatment with the drug e.g. a troublesome side effect that appears only after 30 years of being on the same drug, which could not be known when the drug was first introduced.

In cases where these things occur, it is the withdrawal that is invariably the politically expedient action because it is extremely difficult to prove that a rare event is caused by the drug. Barring the possibility of outright fraud, there is usually nothing unscientific about the initial approval.

Cheers,

Santosh
Gabriel de Figueiredo
2009-12-07 13:44:46 UTC
Permalink
Thalidomide? hGH (causing cjd)?



----- Original Message ----
From: Santosh Helekar <chimbelcho at yahoo.com>
To: estb. 1994!Goa's premiere mailing list <goanet at lists.goanet.org>
Sent: Mon, 7 December, 2009 7:52:42 AM
Subject: Re: [Goanet] Virgin coconut oil...
Post by Santosh Helekar
1. Detection of a rare adverse effect that was not caught in the clinical trials
e.g. a one in 1000,000 chance of dying might not be caught in a scientific study
involving 10,000 patients, and a study involving millions of patients would not
be feasible.
__________________________________________________________________________________
Win 1 of 4 Sony home entertainment packs thanks to Yahoo!7.
Enter now: http://au.docs.yahoo.com/homepageset/
Gabriel de Figueiredo
2009-12-07 13:44:46 UTC
Permalink
Thalidomide? hGH (causing cjd)?



----- Original Message ----
From: Santosh Helekar <chimbelcho at yahoo.com>
To: estb. 1994!Goa's premiere mailing list <goanet at lists.goanet.org>
Sent: Mon, 7 December, 2009 7:52:42 AM
Subject: Re: [Goanet] Virgin coconut oil...
Post by Santosh Helekar
1. Detection of a rare adverse effect that was not caught in the clinical trials
e.g. a one in 1000,000 chance of dying might not be caught in a scientific study
involving 10,000 patients, and a study involving millions of patients would not
be feasible.
__________________________________________________________________________________
Win 1 of 4 Sony home entertainment packs thanks to Yahoo!7.
Enter now: http://au.docs.yahoo.com/homepageset/
Gabriel de Figueiredo
2009-12-07 13:44:46 UTC
Permalink
Thalidomide? hGH (causing cjd)?



----- Original Message ----
From: Santosh Helekar <chimbelcho at yahoo.com>
To: estb. 1994!Goa's premiere mailing list <goanet at lists.goanet.org>
Sent: Mon, 7 December, 2009 7:52:42 AM
Subject: Re: [Goanet] Virgin coconut oil...
Post by Santosh Helekar
1. Detection of a rare adverse effect that was not caught in the clinical trials
e.g. a one in 1000,000 chance of dying might not be caught in a scientific study
involving 10,000 patients, and a study involving millions of patients would not
be feasible.
__________________________________________________________________________________
Win 1 of 4 Sony home entertainment packs thanks to Yahoo!7.
Enter now: http://au.docs.yahoo.com/homepageset/
Gabriel de Figueiredo
2009-12-07 13:44:46 UTC
Permalink
Thalidomide? hGH (causing cjd)?



----- Original Message ----
From: Santosh Helekar <chimbelcho at yahoo.com>
To: estb. 1994!Goa's premiere mailing list <goanet at lists.goanet.org>
Sent: Mon, 7 December, 2009 7:52:42 AM
Subject: Re: [Goanet] Virgin coconut oil...
Post by Santosh Helekar
1. Detection of a rare adverse effect that was not caught in the clinical trials
e.g. a one in 1000,000 chance of dying might not be caught in a scientific study
involving 10,000 patients, and a study involving millions of patients would not
be feasible.
__________________________________________________________________________________
Win 1 of 4 Sony home entertainment packs thanks to Yahoo!7.
Enter now: http://au.docs.yahoo.com/homepageset/
Gabriel de Figueiredo
2009-12-07 13:44:46 UTC
Permalink
Thalidomide? hGH (causing cjd)?



----- Original Message ----
From: Santosh Helekar <chimbelcho at yahoo.com>
To: estb. 1994!Goa's premiere mailing list <goanet at lists.goanet.org>
Sent: Mon, 7 December, 2009 7:52:42 AM
Subject: Re: [Goanet] Virgin coconut oil...
Post by Santosh Helekar
1. Detection of a rare adverse effect that was not caught in the clinical trials
e.g. a one in 1000,000 chance of dying might not be caught in a scientific study
involving 10,000 patients, and a study involving millions of patients would not
be feasible.
__________________________________________________________________________________
Win 1 of 4 Sony home entertainment packs thanks to Yahoo!7.
Enter now: http://au.docs.yahoo.com/homepageset/
Gabriel de Figueiredo
2009-12-07 13:44:46 UTC
Permalink
Thalidomide? hGH (causing cjd)?



----- Original Message ----
From: Santosh Helekar <chimbelcho at yahoo.com>
To: estb. 1994!Goa's premiere mailing list <goanet at lists.goanet.org>
Sent: Mon, 7 December, 2009 7:52:42 AM
Subject: Re: [Goanet] Virgin coconut oil...
Post by Santosh Helekar
1. Detection of a rare adverse effect that was not caught in the clinical trials
e.g. a one in 1000,000 chance of dying might not be caught in a scientific study
involving 10,000 patients, and a study involving millions of patients would not
be feasible.
__________________________________________________________________________________
Win 1 of 4 Sony home entertainment packs thanks to Yahoo!7.
Enter now: http://au.docs.yahoo.com/homepageset/
Mervyn Lobo
2009-12-07 17:15:03 UTC
Permalink
However, I do not expect my state to cover my medical bills because my state is a poor state
and cannot afford such luxuries :-)) when it can afford mega luxuries for its chosen ones.?
floriano,
I agree with you in regards to the "chosen ones." I am especially glad that?the Goa Govt has
the money to sponsor the vacations of half a dozen young Canadians every year.
As far as growing spinach and coconuts in the Canadian backyards is concerned, you may be right.
However, you must take note that my brother who lives in Missisauga has successfully grown
patoi'eamche khole' and has made and enjoyed patoieos far removed from home too. And I had a
tough time to send him some live 'volod' disguised as medicinal roots :-))
Yes, it does take a few years for?immigrants to understand that?the laws here are to protect residents
and the Canadian economy. For example, if you bring Goan sausages into Canada, the customs officer
will don on gloves, pick the sausages out of your bag and put both the sausages and gloves into an
incinerator.?The same guys will actually snatch?an apple from a baby's hands and drop it into the same
incinerator. In both cases, this is done to protect diseases from?spreading into and devastating the
Canadian economy.



Despite this, people still try to circumnavigate the law. Some learn about Canadian laws only
when they are given hefty fines for failing to comply. On the?other hand, businessmen have found out
the hard way that there is a limit to how many people you can fool in a literate society. The health section
of the newspapers here keep their readers updated?on the latest advances of medical sciences. In addition,
when a cause for any disease becomes know, the Govt, i.e.?the guarantor of public health, will disseminate
the info in a way that it reaches all those in the high risk category. This is done because it is always more
cost effective to prevent a disease?than to?pay for its treatment.



As an example,?the Canadian Govt targets those?whose origins are in the Indian sub-continent by informing
them that, because of their diet, they?are in the high risk category for?high blood pressure,?heart and cardio-
vascular diseases. Poly saturates, found in coconut oil, is about the worst food for those with high cholesterol
levels. To make this simple to understand, if coconut oil was beneficial, it would command premium prices.
?
?
Virgin coconut oil would be snapped up by the multi-nationals, patented, and marketed using brand names.
?
?
Mervyn Lobo
Since trade ignores national boundaries and the manufacturer insists on having the world as a market,
the flag of his nation must follow him, and the doors of the nations which are closed against him must be
battered down. Concessions obtained by financiers must be safeguarded by ministers of state, even if the
sovereignty of unwilling nations be outraged in the process. Colonies must be obtained or planted, in order
that no useful corner of the world may be overlooked or left unused.
?-?Woodrow Wilson -?President of the United States.


__________________________________________________________________
Ask a question on any topic and get answers from real people. Go to Yahoo! Answers and share what you know at http://ca.answers.yahoo.com
augusto pinto
2009-12-07 10:21:50 UTC
Permalink
I wish to state that it is a falsity that coconut oil has anything to do
with preserving anyone's virginity. Ask any Dotor.

As the Bohemian Dotor will no doubt agree, this is a totally false and
misleading statement that the famous bondollam marpi alias journo is
feeding to the gullible goanet readership. No virgin. he will aver. has ever
retained it after having a nice ... whatever ... either by cooking her food
in coconut oil, or by using it to ...

I am also sure that the American Dotor will refute the scientific basis
behind this canard in scholarly terms quoting at least 14 websites and the
thread will persist for 14 generations after a learned Padri asserts that
natural family planning methods are better than virgin oil.

Finally the Ingineiro Dotor will prove that it is just a ruse to promote a
new book about coconuts regarding a certain master craftsman Vijaydatta
Lotlikar's fortcoming book 'The Art of Coconut Craft' which is to be
released on December 7, 2009 (Monday) at the Institute Menezes Braganza art
gallery at 4 pm. And that Ghantis migrating into Goa thus rendering all
Renders redundant are the root cause of virgins losing it to them.

Personally I think that any publicity is good publicity and virgins are the
best.

Cheers
Augusto
--
Augusto Pinto
40, Novo Portugal,
Moira, Bardez,
Goa, India
E pintogoa at gmail.com or ypintogoa at yahoo.co.in
P 0832-2470336
M 9881126350
Santosh Helekar
2009-12-08 04:30:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gabriel de Figueiredo
Thalidomide? hGH (causing cjd)?
These are wrong examples. Thalidomide was not approved by U.S. FDA when its teratogenic (birth defect causing) effects were discovered. The naturally occurring human Growth Hormone (hGH) that led to a few cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) was a contaminated batch containing the causative agent for the latter disease, extracted from cadaveric human pituitary glands. The contamination happened before 1977 in studies conducted before U.S. FDA approval, and before the causative agent of CJD was discovered, which is now known to belong to a class of simple proteins called prions. Because of this U.S. FDA did not approve human pituitary-derived natural hGH. Instead, in 1985 it approved artificial or synthetic hGH as a drug for human use.

U.S. FDA has now also approved Thalidomide for the treatment of a form of blood cancer and a type of skin condition.

Cheers,

Santosh
Bosco D
2009-12-06 04:28:44 UTC
Permalink
-----Original Message-----
From: Santosh Helekar
Hundred years ago the life expectancy of a human being in India was 25 years.
In 1947 .....Indians .....could only expect to live for 36 years.
In 1961 .....Indian citizen in Goa ..... could survive beyond 42 years of age
Today, any toddler in India can hope to live on an average for 70 years
RESPONSE: If you live(d) in Mumbai (formerly Bombay / Bombaim), where do/did you
live?

QTE
If you reside in Nana Chowk or Marine Lines, you can expect to live for about 20
years more than your friend in Chembur (E), 13 years more than the average Byculla
or Matunga resident, 10 years more than someone living in Santa Cruz and about seven
more years than the average person staying in Dadar.

TOI had earlier reported a study which had found that the average Mumbaikar was
likely to die at least seven years before other Indians and about 12 years before
people living in the rest of Maharashtra.

Bandra, the queen of the suburbs, had an average life expectancy of 57.96 but the
far western suburb of Borivli was better with 58.58 years. And Santa Cruz, only a
few kilometres away from Bandra, fared much worse with 50.19 years. In the congested
areas of Dadar and Parel, the average age life expectancy was found to be 53.95 and
46.41 years respectively.

END-QTE

Perhaps the data on Goa would be insightful considering the demographics are
'evolving'.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/mumbai/Expect-to-live-long-if-born-in-Nana-Chowk/articleshow/5298272.cms
Frederick Noronha
2009-12-06 10:24:23 UTC
Permalink
Most interesting. Does this have more to do with the progress of
Science in different parts of the city, the availability of
health-care (or the exclusion from it of certain segments of the
population) or economic disparity? Or a combination of one or more of
the above causes? Just curious... FN
Post by Bosco D
-----Original Message-----
From: Santosh Helekar
Hundred years ago the life expectancy of a human being in India was 25 years.
In 1947 .....Indians .....could only expect to live for 36 years.
In 1961 .....Indian citizen in Goa ..... could survive beyond 42 years of age
Today, any toddler in India can hope to live on an average for 70 years
RESPONSE: If you live(d) in Mumbai (formerly Bombay / Bombaim), where do/did you
live?
QTE
If you reside in Nana Chowk or Marine Lines, you can expect to live for about 20
years more than your friend in Chembur (E), 13 years more than the average Byculla
or Matunga resident, 10 years more than someone living in Santa Cruz and about seven
more years than the average person staying in Dadar....
TOI had earlier reported a study which had found that the average Mumbaikar was
likely to die at least seven years before other Indians and about 12 years before
people living in the rest of Maharashtra.
--
Frederick Noronha :: +91-832-2409490
ANOTHER GOA: http://tiny.cc/anothergoa
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/fredericknoronha
Writing, editing, alt.publishing, photography, journalism
Santosh Helekar
2009-12-06 20:52:42 UTC
Permalink
Can you elucidate me some as to how these drugs did get the OK in the >first place if the prio proven results were completely documented?
Dear Floriano,

Assuming that a regulatory agency is functioning optimally and responsibly, two reasons why a drug that got an approval initially might be withdrawn subsequently are as follows:

1. Detection of a rare adverse effect that was not caught in the clinical trials e.g. a one in 1000,000 chance of dying might not be caught in a scientific study involving 10,000 patients, and a study involving millions of patients would not be feasible.

2. Detection of an adverse effect that occurs only after decades long treatment with the drug e.g. a troublesome side effect that appears only after 30 years of being on the same drug, which could not be known when the drug was first introduced.

In cases where these things occur, it is the withdrawal that is invariably the politically expedient action because it is extremely difficult to prove that a rare event is caused by the drug. Barring the possibility of outright fraud, there is usually nothing unscientific about the initial approval.

Cheers,

Santosh
Santosh Helekar
2009-12-08 04:30:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gabriel de Figueiredo
Thalidomide? hGH (causing cjd)?
These are wrong examples. Thalidomide was not approved by U.S. FDA when its teratogenic (birth defect causing) effects were discovered. The naturally occurring human Growth Hormone (hGH) that led to a few cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) was a contaminated batch containing the causative agent for the latter disease, extracted from cadaveric human pituitary glands. The contamination happened before 1977 in studies conducted before U.S. FDA approval, and before the causative agent of CJD was discovered, which is now known to belong to a class of simple proteins called prions. Because of this U.S. FDA did not approve human pituitary-derived natural hGH. Instead, in 1985 it approved artificial or synthetic hGH as a drug for human use.

U.S. FDA has now also approved Thalidomide for the treatment of a form of blood cancer and a type of skin condition.

Cheers,

Santosh
Bosco D
2009-12-06 04:28:44 UTC
Permalink
-----Original Message-----
From: Santosh Helekar
Hundred years ago the life expectancy of a human being in India was 25 years.
In 1947 .....Indians .....could only expect to live for 36 years.
In 1961 .....Indian citizen in Goa ..... could survive beyond 42 years of age
Today, any toddler in India can hope to live on an average for 70 years
RESPONSE: If you live(d) in Mumbai (formerly Bombay / Bombaim), where do/did you
live?

QTE
If you reside in Nana Chowk or Marine Lines, you can expect to live for about 20
years more than your friend in Chembur (E), 13 years more than the average Byculla
or Matunga resident, 10 years more than someone living in Santa Cruz and about seven
more years than the average person staying in Dadar.

TOI had earlier reported a study which had found that the average Mumbaikar was
likely to die at least seven years before other Indians and about 12 years before
people living in the rest of Maharashtra.

Bandra, the queen of the suburbs, had an average life expectancy of 57.96 but the
far western suburb of Borivli was better with 58.58 years. And Santa Cruz, only a
few kilometres away from Bandra, fared much worse with 50.19 years. In the congested
areas of Dadar and Parel, the average age life expectancy was found to be 53.95 and
46.41 years respectively.

END-QTE

Perhaps the data on Goa would be insightful considering the demographics are
'evolving'.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/mumbai/Expect-to-live-long-if-born-in-Nana-Chowk/articleshow/5298272.cms
Frederick Noronha
2009-12-06 10:24:23 UTC
Permalink
Most interesting. Does this have more to do with the progress of
Science in different parts of the city, the availability of
health-care (or the exclusion from it of certain segments of the
population) or economic disparity? Or a combination of one or more of
the above causes? Just curious... FN
Post by Bosco D
-----Original Message-----
From: Santosh Helekar
Hundred years ago the life expectancy of a human being in India was 25 years.
In 1947 .....Indians .....could only expect to live for 36 years.
In 1961 .....Indian citizen in Goa ..... could survive beyond 42 years of age
Today, any toddler in India can hope to live on an average for 70 years
RESPONSE: If you live(d) in Mumbai (formerly Bombay / Bombaim), where do/did you
live?
QTE
If you reside in Nana Chowk or Marine Lines, you can expect to live for about 20
years more than your friend in Chembur (E), 13 years more than the average Byculla
or Matunga resident, 10 years more than someone living in Santa Cruz and about seven
more years than the average person staying in Dadar....
TOI had earlier reported a study which had found that the average Mumbaikar was
likely to die at least seven years before other Indians and about 12 years before
people living in the rest of Maharashtra.
--
Frederick Noronha :: +91-832-2409490
ANOTHER GOA: http://tiny.cc/anothergoa
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/fredericknoronha
Writing, editing, alt.publishing, photography, journalism
Santosh Helekar
2009-12-06 20:52:42 UTC
Permalink
Can you elucidate me some as to how these drugs did get the OK in the >first place if the prio proven results were completely documented?
Dear Floriano,

Assuming that a regulatory agency is functioning optimally and responsibly, two reasons why a drug that got an approval initially might be withdrawn subsequently are as follows:

1. Detection of a rare adverse effect that was not caught in the clinical trials e.g. a one in 1000,000 chance of dying might not be caught in a scientific study involving 10,000 patients, and a study involving millions of patients would not be feasible.

2. Detection of an adverse effect that occurs only after decades long treatment with the drug e.g. a troublesome side effect that appears only after 30 years of being on the same drug, which could not be known when the drug was first introduced.

In cases where these things occur, it is the withdrawal that is invariably the politically expedient action because it is extremely difficult to prove that a rare event is caused by the drug. Barring the possibility of outright fraud, there is usually nothing unscientific about the initial approval.

Cheers,

Santosh
Santosh Helekar
2009-12-08 04:30:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gabriel de Figueiredo
Thalidomide? hGH (causing cjd)?
These are wrong examples. Thalidomide was not approved by U.S. FDA when its teratogenic (birth defect causing) effects were discovered. The naturally occurring human Growth Hormone (hGH) that led to a few cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) was a contaminated batch containing the causative agent for the latter disease, extracted from cadaveric human pituitary glands. The contamination happened before 1977 in studies conducted before U.S. FDA approval, and before the causative agent of CJD was discovered, which is now known to belong to a class of simple proteins called prions. Because of this U.S. FDA did not approve human pituitary-derived natural hGH. Instead, in 1985 it approved artificial or synthetic hGH as a drug for human use.

U.S. FDA has now also approved Thalidomide for the treatment of a form of blood cancer and a type of skin condition.

Cheers,

Santosh
Bosco D
2009-12-06 04:28:44 UTC
Permalink
-----Original Message-----
From: Santosh Helekar
Hundred years ago the life expectancy of a human being in India was 25 years.
In 1947 .....Indians .....could only expect to live for 36 years.
In 1961 .....Indian citizen in Goa ..... could survive beyond 42 years of age
Today, any toddler in India can hope to live on an average for 70 years
RESPONSE: If you live(d) in Mumbai (formerly Bombay / Bombaim), where do/did you
live?

QTE
If you reside in Nana Chowk or Marine Lines, you can expect to live for about 20
years more than your friend in Chembur (E), 13 years more than the average Byculla
or Matunga resident, 10 years more than someone living in Santa Cruz and about seven
more years than the average person staying in Dadar.

TOI had earlier reported a study which had found that the average Mumbaikar was
likely to die at least seven years before other Indians and about 12 years before
people living in the rest of Maharashtra.

Bandra, the queen of the suburbs, had an average life expectancy of 57.96 but the
far western suburb of Borivli was better with 58.58 years. And Santa Cruz, only a
few kilometres away from Bandra, fared much worse with 50.19 years. In the congested
areas of Dadar and Parel, the average age life expectancy was found to be 53.95 and
46.41 years respectively.

END-QTE

Perhaps the data on Goa would be insightful considering the demographics are
'evolving'.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/mumbai/Expect-to-live-long-if-born-in-Nana-Chowk/articleshow/5298272.cms
Frederick Noronha
2009-12-06 10:24:23 UTC
Permalink
Most interesting. Does this have more to do with the progress of
Science in different parts of the city, the availability of
health-care (or the exclusion from it of certain segments of the
population) or economic disparity? Or a combination of one or more of
the above causes? Just curious... FN
Post by Bosco D
-----Original Message-----
From: Santosh Helekar
Hundred years ago the life expectancy of a human being in India was 25 years.
In 1947 .....Indians .....could only expect to live for 36 years.
In 1961 .....Indian citizen in Goa ..... could survive beyond 42 years of age
Today, any toddler in India can hope to live on an average for 70 years
RESPONSE: If you live(d) in Mumbai (formerly Bombay / Bombaim), where do/did you
live?
QTE
If you reside in Nana Chowk or Marine Lines, you can expect to live for about 20
years more than your friend in Chembur (E), 13 years more than the average Byculla
or Matunga resident, 10 years more than someone living in Santa Cruz and about seven
more years than the average person staying in Dadar....
TOI had earlier reported a study which had found that the average Mumbaikar was
likely to die at least seven years before other Indians and about 12 years before
people living in the rest of Maharashtra.
--
Frederick Noronha :: +91-832-2409490
ANOTHER GOA: http://tiny.cc/anothergoa
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/fredericknoronha
Writing, editing, alt.publishing, photography, journalism
Santosh Helekar
2009-12-06 20:52:42 UTC
Permalink
Can you elucidate me some as to how these drugs did get the OK in the >first place if the prio proven results were completely documented?
Dear Floriano,

Assuming that a regulatory agency is functioning optimally and responsibly, two reasons why a drug that got an approval initially might be withdrawn subsequently are as follows:

1. Detection of a rare adverse effect that was not caught in the clinical trials e.g. a one in 1000,000 chance of dying might not be caught in a scientific study involving 10,000 patients, and a study involving millions of patients would not be feasible.

2. Detection of an adverse effect that occurs only after decades long treatment with the drug e.g. a troublesome side effect that appears only after 30 years of being on the same drug, which could not be known when the drug was first introduced.

In cases where these things occur, it is the withdrawal that is invariably the politically expedient action because it is extremely difficult to prove that a rare event is caused by the drug. Barring the possibility of outright fraud, there is usually nothing unscientific about the initial approval.

Cheers,

Santosh
Santosh Helekar
2009-12-08 04:30:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gabriel de Figueiredo
Thalidomide? hGH (causing cjd)?
These are wrong examples. Thalidomide was not approved by U.S. FDA when its teratogenic (birth defect causing) effects were discovered. The naturally occurring human Growth Hormone (hGH) that led to a few cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) was a contaminated batch containing the causative agent for the latter disease, extracted from cadaveric human pituitary glands. The contamination happened before 1977 in studies conducted before U.S. FDA approval, and before the causative agent of CJD was discovered, which is now known to belong to a class of simple proteins called prions. Because of this U.S. FDA did not approve human pituitary-derived natural hGH. Instead, in 1985 it approved artificial or synthetic hGH as a drug for human use.

U.S. FDA has now also approved Thalidomide for the treatment of a form of blood cancer and a type of skin condition.

Cheers,

Santosh
Bosco D
2009-12-06 04:28:44 UTC
Permalink
-----Original Message-----
From: Santosh Helekar
Hundred years ago the life expectancy of a human being in India was 25 years.
In 1947 .....Indians .....could only expect to live for 36 years.
In 1961 .....Indian citizen in Goa ..... could survive beyond 42 years of age
Today, any toddler in India can hope to live on an average for 70 years
RESPONSE: If you live(d) in Mumbai (formerly Bombay / Bombaim), where do/did you
live?

QTE
If you reside in Nana Chowk or Marine Lines, you can expect to live for about 20
years more than your friend in Chembur (E), 13 years more than the average Byculla
or Matunga resident, 10 years more than someone living in Santa Cruz and about seven
more years than the average person staying in Dadar.

TOI had earlier reported a study which had found that the average Mumbaikar was
likely to die at least seven years before other Indians and about 12 years before
people living in the rest of Maharashtra.

Bandra, the queen of the suburbs, had an average life expectancy of 57.96 but the
far western suburb of Borivli was better with 58.58 years. And Santa Cruz, only a
few kilometres away from Bandra, fared much worse with 50.19 years. In the congested
areas of Dadar and Parel, the average age life expectancy was found to be 53.95 and
46.41 years respectively.

END-QTE

Perhaps the data on Goa would be insightful considering the demographics are
'evolving'.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/mumbai/Expect-to-live-long-if-born-in-Nana-Chowk/articleshow/5298272.cms
Frederick Noronha
2009-12-06 10:24:23 UTC
Permalink
Most interesting. Does this have more to do with the progress of
Science in different parts of the city, the availability of
health-care (or the exclusion from it of certain segments of the
population) or economic disparity? Or a combination of one or more of
the above causes? Just curious... FN
Post by Bosco D
-----Original Message-----
From: Santosh Helekar
Hundred years ago the life expectancy of a human being in India was 25 years.
In 1947 .....Indians .....could only expect to live for 36 years.
In 1961 .....Indian citizen in Goa ..... could survive beyond 42 years of age
Today, any toddler in India can hope to live on an average for 70 years
RESPONSE: If you live(d) in Mumbai (formerly Bombay / Bombaim), where do/did you
live?
QTE
If you reside in Nana Chowk or Marine Lines, you can expect to live for about 20
years more than your friend in Chembur (E), 13 years more than the average Byculla
or Matunga resident, 10 years more than someone living in Santa Cruz and about seven
more years than the average person staying in Dadar....
TOI had earlier reported a study which had found that the average Mumbaikar was
likely to die at least seven years before other Indians and about 12 years before
people living in the rest of Maharashtra.
--
Frederick Noronha :: +91-832-2409490
ANOTHER GOA: http://tiny.cc/anothergoa
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/fredericknoronha
Writing, editing, alt.publishing, photography, journalism
Santosh Helekar
2009-12-06 20:52:42 UTC
Permalink
Can you elucidate me some as to how these drugs did get the OK in the >first place if the prio proven results were completely documented?
Dear Floriano,

Assuming that a regulatory agency is functioning optimally and responsibly, two reasons why a drug that got an approval initially might be withdrawn subsequently are as follows:

1. Detection of a rare adverse effect that was not caught in the clinical trials e.g. a one in 1000,000 chance of dying might not be caught in a scientific study involving 10,000 patients, and a study involving millions of patients would not be feasible.

2. Detection of an adverse effect that occurs only after decades long treatment with the drug e.g. a troublesome side effect that appears only after 30 years of being on the same drug, which could not be known when the drug was first introduced.

In cases where these things occur, it is the withdrawal that is invariably the politically expedient action because it is extremely difficult to prove that a rare event is caused by the drug. Barring the possibility of outright fraud, there is usually nothing unscientific about the initial approval.

Cheers,

Santosh
Santosh Helekar
2009-12-08 04:30:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gabriel de Figueiredo
Thalidomide? hGH (causing cjd)?
These are wrong examples. Thalidomide was not approved by U.S. FDA when its teratogenic (birth defect causing) effects were discovered. The naturally occurring human Growth Hormone (hGH) that led to a few cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) was a contaminated batch containing the causative agent for the latter disease, extracted from cadaveric human pituitary glands. The contamination happened before 1977 in studies conducted before U.S. FDA approval, and before the causative agent of CJD was discovered, which is now known to belong to a class of simple proteins called prions. Because of this U.S. FDA did not approve human pituitary-derived natural hGH. Instead, in 1985 it approved artificial or synthetic hGH as a drug for human use.

U.S. FDA has now also approved Thalidomide for the treatment of a form of blood cancer and a type of skin condition.

Cheers,

Santosh
Bosco D
2009-12-06 04:28:44 UTC
Permalink
-----Original Message-----
From: Santosh Helekar
Hundred years ago the life expectancy of a human being in India was 25 years.
In 1947 .....Indians .....could only expect to live for 36 years.
In 1961 .....Indian citizen in Goa ..... could survive beyond 42 years of age
Today, any toddler in India can hope to live on an average for 70 years
RESPONSE: If you live(d) in Mumbai (formerly Bombay / Bombaim), where do/did you
live?

QTE
If you reside in Nana Chowk or Marine Lines, you can expect to live for about 20
years more than your friend in Chembur (E), 13 years more than the average Byculla
or Matunga resident, 10 years more than someone living in Santa Cruz and about seven
more years than the average person staying in Dadar.

TOI had earlier reported a study which had found that the average Mumbaikar was
likely to die at least seven years before other Indians and about 12 years before
people living in the rest of Maharashtra.

Bandra, the queen of the suburbs, had an average life expectancy of 57.96 but the
far western suburb of Borivli was better with 58.58 years. And Santa Cruz, only a
few kilometres away from Bandra, fared much worse with 50.19 years. In the congested
areas of Dadar and Parel, the average age life expectancy was found to be 53.95 and
46.41 years respectively.

END-QTE

Perhaps the data on Goa would be insightful considering the demographics are
'evolving'.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/mumbai/Expect-to-live-long-if-born-in-Nana-Chowk/articleshow/5298272.cms
Frederick Noronha
2009-12-06 10:24:23 UTC
Permalink
Most interesting. Does this have more to do with the progress of
Science in different parts of the city, the availability of
health-care (or the exclusion from it of certain segments of the
population) or economic disparity? Or a combination of one or more of
the above causes? Just curious... FN
Post by Bosco D
-----Original Message-----
From: Santosh Helekar
Hundred years ago the life expectancy of a human being in India was 25 years.
In 1947 .....Indians .....could only expect to live for 36 years.
In 1961 .....Indian citizen in Goa ..... could survive beyond 42 years of age
Today, any toddler in India can hope to live on an average for 70 years
RESPONSE: If you live(d) in Mumbai (formerly Bombay / Bombaim), where do/did you
live?
QTE
If you reside in Nana Chowk or Marine Lines, you can expect to live for about 20
years more than your friend in Chembur (E), 13 years more than the average Byculla
or Matunga resident, 10 years more than someone living in Santa Cruz and about seven
more years than the average person staying in Dadar....
TOI had earlier reported a study which had found that the average Mumbaikar was
likely to die at least seven years before other Indians and about 12 years before
people living in the rest of Maharashtra.
--
Frederick Noronha :: +91-832-2409490
ANOTHER GOA: http://tiny.cc/anothergoa
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/fredericknoronha
Writing, editing, alt.publishing, photography, journalism
Santosh Helekar
2009-12-06 20:52:42 UTC
Permalink
Can you elucidate me some as to how these drugs did get the OK in the >first place if the prio proven results were completely documented?
Dear Floriano,

Assuming that a regulatory agency is functioning optimally and responsibly, two reasons why a drug that got an approval initially might be withdrawn subsequently are as follows:

1. Detection of a rare adverse effect that was not caught in the clinical trials e.g. a one in 1000,000 chance of dying might not be caught in a scientific study involving 10,000 patients, and a study involving millions of patients would not be feasible.

2. Detection of an adverse effect that occurs only after decades long treatment with the drug e.g. a troublesome side effect that appears only after 30 years of being on the same drug, which could not be known when the drug was first introduced.

In cases where these things occur, it is the withdrawal that is invariably the politically expedient action because it is extremely difficult to prove that a rare event is caused by the drug. Barring the possibility of outright fraud, there is usually nothing unscientific about the initial approval.

Cheers,

Santosh
Santosh Helekar
2009-12-08 04:30:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gabriel de Figueiredo
Thalidomide? hGH (causing cjd)?
These are wrong examples. Thalidomide was not approved by U.S. FDA when its teratogenic (birth defect causing) effects were discovered. The naturally occurring human Growth Hormone (hGH) that led to a few cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) was a contaminated batch containing the causative agent for the latter disease, extracted from cadaveric human pituitary glands. The contamination happened before 1977 in studies conducted before U.S. FDA approval, and before the causative agent of CJD was discovered, which is now known to belong to a class of simple proteins called prions. Because of this U.S. FDA did not approve human pituitary-derived natural hGH. Instead, in 1985 it approved artificial or synthetic hGH as a drug for human use.

U.S. FDA has now also approved Thalidomide for the treatment of a form of blood cancer and a type of skin condition.

Cheers,

Santosh

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