Discussion:
HAPPY DEEPAVALI
(too old to reply)
mario rodrigues
2008-10-27 15:07:25 UTC
Permalink
I came across their own values/messages/opinions/teachings of Diwali and thought of sharing them (part of it) with you and with others. Tried to reduce as much as possible. Bit lengthy but worth reading and practising , especially to understand true meaning of diwali. HAPPY DEEPAVALI to ONE AND ALL- Regards-Mario 1. Swami Shivananda SaraswatiThe deeper meaning of Diwali is celebration of the message of Lord Rama?s life of sacrifice and dharma. Lord Rama lived in hardship and exile for 14 years in the forest, it was neither a fun-filled experience nor an easy life, amongst the poorest of the poor in order to fulfill the terms of his father?s debt.Most of you received your education in India before going abroad to earn a living and raise a family. The money that you did not pay came from the poor. You were given free education because they were given nothing. The degree enables him to succeed in the foreign land and to prosper there. The debt is to those who subsidised that education, so that other people could receive that subsidised education at a very small cost. Now that debt must be repaid. In order to repay it, we must make some sacrifice. Remember that is dharma. Sacrifice for the sake of righteousness is the essence of Indian culture. This is the message of Lord Rama?s life. We must not only worship Lord Rama on Diwali; we must also take a pledge to follow him. We must vow to fulfil our own responsibilities, to give back what we have taken from the poor. When we too practise this dharma, we will really have something to celebrate. Indian culture says that we are all one. Indian culture says that as our brothers and sisters suffer in darkness, so we too are suffering, although we may not be aware of it. 2. SWAMI CHIDANANDA SARASWATI We decorate our homes with lanterns; but why? Too many people turn this into a domestic beauty contest, spending days and a great deal of money to purchase the newest dias, the most beautiful candles. ?We had 75 candles burning last night,? we gloat. This is only the light of glamour. It is not the light of God. One piece of cotton soaked in ghee, lit with a pure heart, a conscious mind and an earnest desire to be free from ignorance is far ?brighter? than 100 fashion deepaks, lit in simple unconscious revelry.On this day we clean every room of the house; we dust every corner of the garage, we sweep behind bookshelves, vacuum under beds and empty out cabinets. But, what about our hearts? When was the last time we swept out our hearts? When did we last empty them of all the dirt and garbage that has accumulated throughout our lives?Let us truly clean out our hearts; let us rid ourselves of the grudges, pain, and anger that clutter our ability to love freely.Additionally, on Diwali, we begin a new checkbook; we put last year?s accounts to rest. But, what about our own balance sheets? When was the last time we assessed our minuses and plusses, our strengths and our weaknesses, our good deeds and selfish deeds? How many years? worth of grudges and bitterness and pain have we left unchecked?A good businessman always checks his balance sheet: how much he spent, how much he earned. A good teacher always checks the progress of her students: how many are passing, how many are failing. And they assess themselves accordingly: ?Am I a good businessman?? ?Am I a good teacher?? In the same way we must assess the balance sheets of our lives. Look at the last year. Where do we stand? How many people did we hurt? How many did we heal? How many times did we lose our temper? How many times did we give more than we received? Then, just as we give our past checkbooks and the first check of our new one to God, let us give all our minus and plus points to Him. He is the one responsible for all our good deeds. And our bad ones are due only to ignorance. So, let us turn everything over to Him, putting our strengths, our weaknesses, our wins and our losses at His holy feet. And then, let us start afresh, with a new book, unadulterated by old grudges and bitterness.It is only God?s presence in our lives which makes us rich. Look at India. People in small villages, in holy towns, in ancient cities have very little in terms of material possessions. Most of them live below the Western standards of poverty. Yet, if you tell them they are poor, they won?t believe you, for in their opinion they are not. This is because they have God at the center of their lives. Their homes may not have TV sets, but they all have small mandirs; the children may not know the words to the latest rock and roll song, but they know the words to Aarti; they may not have computers or fancy history text books, but they know the stories of the Ramayana, the Mahabharata and other holy scriptures; they may not begin their days with newspapers, but they begin with prayer.If you go to these villages you may see what looks like poverty to you. But, if you look a little closer, you will see that these people have a light shining in their eyes, a glow on their faces and a song in their hearts that money cannot buy.On Diwali, we must pray to Maha Lakshmi to bestow real prosperity upon us, the prosperity that brings light to our lives and sparkle to our eyes. We must pray for an abundance of faith, not money; we must pray for success in our spiritual lives, not a promotion at work; we must pray for the love of God, not the love of the beautiful girl (or boy) in our class.Let us pray to Maha Lakshmi to bestow the divine gifts of faith, purity and devotion upon us. With those, we will always be always rich, always prosperous, and always fulfilled. Let us celebrate Diwali this year as a true ?holy day,? not only as another frivolous ?holiday.?3. Ms Adah Sharma:-?I personally do not like to unnecessarily torture the environment since it has been very kind to me. I have never burnt/burst crackers as I don?t like to contribute to sound and air pollution.?I am also aware that the children who are roped in to make these crackers in factories are very young (6 to 8 yrs) and by the time they are 14 they?re fingers get eaten up and they are unable to even hold a pen to write.?I have seen stray dogs and other street animals who get petrified with the sound of crackers. They don?t have homes like we do to hide in! ?I know all this sounds very morbid but I would like to tell everyone to have a very happy Diwali but try to be environment friendly this year,? she concluded.
_________________________________________________________________
Explore the seven wonders of the world
http://search.msn.com/results.aspx?q=7+wonders+world&mkt=en-US&form=QBRE
mario rodrigues
2008-10-27 15:07:25 UTC
Permalink
I came across their own values/messages/opinions/teachings of Diwali and thought of sharing them (part of it) with you and with others. Tried to reduce as much as possible. Bit lengthy but worth reading and practising , especially to understand true meaning of diwali. HAPPY DEEPAVALI to ONE AND ALL- Regards-Mario 1. Swami Shivananda SaraswatiThe deeper meaning of Diwali is celebration of the message of Lord Rama?s life of sacrifice and dharma. Lord Rama lived in hardship and exile for 14 years in the forest, it was neither a fun-filled experience nor an easy life, amongst the poorest of the poor in order to fulfill the terms of his father?s debt.Most of you received your education in India before going abroad to earn a living and raise a family. The money that you did not pay came from the poor. You were given free education because they were given nothing. The degree enables him to succeed in the foreign land and to prosper there. The debt is to those who subsidised that education, so that other people could receive that subsidised education at a very small cost. Now that debt must be repaid. In order to repay it, we must make some sacrifice. Remember that is dharma. Sacrifice for the sake of righteousness is the essence of Indian culture. This is the message of Lord Rama?s life. We must not only worship Lord Rama on Diwali; we must also take a pledge to follow him. We must vow to fulfil our own responsibilities, to give back what we have taken from the poor. When we too practise this dharma, we will really have something to celebrate. Indian culture says that we are all one. Indian culture says that as our brothers and sisters suffer in darkness, so we too are suffering, although we may not be aware of it. 2. SWAMI CHIDANANDA SARASWATI We decorate our homes with lanterns; but why? Too many people turn this into a domestic beauty contest, spending days and a great deal of money to purchase the newest dias, the most beautiful candles. ?We had 75 candles burning last night,? we gloat. This is only the light of glamour. It is not the light of God. One piece of cotton soaked in ghee, lit with a pure heart, a conscious mind and an earnest desire to be free from ignorance is far ?brighter? than 100 fashion deepaks, lit in simple unconscious revelry.On this day we clean every room of the house; we dust every corner of the garage, we sweep behind bookshelves, vacuum under beds and empty out cabinets. But, what about our hearts? When was the last time we swept out our hearts? When did we last empty them of all the dirt and garbage that has accumulated throughout our lives?Let us truly clean out our hearts; let us rid ourselves of the grudges, pain, and anger that clutter our ability to love freely.Additionally, on Diwali, we begin a new checkbook; we put last year?s accounts to rest. But, what about our own balance sheets? When was the last time we assessed our minuses and plusses, our strengths and our weaknesses, our good deeds and selfish deeds? How many years? worth of grudges and bitterness and pain have we left unchecked?A good businessman always checks his balance sheet: how much he spent, how much he earned. A good teacher always checks the progress of her students: how many are passing, how many are failing. And they assess themselves accordingly: ?Am I a good businessman?? ?Am I a good teacher?? In the same way we must assess the balance sheets of our lives. Look at the last year. Where do we stand? How many people did we hurt? How many did we heal? How many times did we lose our temper? How many times did we give more than we received? Then, just as we give our past checkbooks and the first check of our new one to God, let us give all our minus and plus points to Him. He is the one responsible for all our good deeds. And our bad ones are due only to ignorance. So, let us turn everything over to Him, putting our strengths, our weaknesses, our wins and our losses at His holy feet. And then, let us start afresh, with a new book, unadulterated by old grudges and bitterness.It is only God?s presence in our lives which makes us rich. Look at India. People in small villages, in holy towns, in ancient cities have very little in terms of material possessions. Most of them live below the Western standards of poverty. Yet, if you tell them they are poor, they won?t believe you, for in their opinion they are not. This is because they have God at the center of their lives. Their homes may not have TV sets, but they all have small mandirs; the children may not know the words to the latest rock and roll song, but they know the words to Aarti; they may not have computers or fancy history text books, but they know the stories of the Ramayana, the Mahabharata and other holy scriptures; they may not begin their days with newspapers, but they begin with prayer.If you go to these villages you may see what looks like poverty to you. But, if you look a little closer, you will see that these people have a light shining in their eyes, a glow on their faces and a song in their hearts that money cannot buy.On Diwali, we must pray to Maha Lakshmi to bestow real prosperity upon us, the prosperity that brings light to our lives and sparkle to our eyes. We must pray for an abundance of faith, not money; we must pray for success in our spiritual lives, not a promotion at work; we must pray for the love of God, not the love of the beautiful girl (or boy) in our class.Let us pray to Maha Lakshmi to bestow the divine gifts of faith, purity and devotion upon us. With those, we will always be always rich, always prosperous, and always fulfilled. Let us celebrate Diwali this year as a true ?holy day,? not only as another frivolous ?holiday.?3. Ms Adah Sharma:-?I personally do not like to unnecessarily torture the environment since it has been very kind to me. I have never burnt/burst crackers as I don?t like to contribute to sound and air pollution.?I am also aware that the children who are roped in to make these crackers in factories are very young (6 to 8 yrs) and by the time they are 14 they?re fingers get eaten up and they are unable to even hold a pen to write.?I have seen stray dogs and other street animals who get petrified with the sound of crackers. They don?t have homes like we do to hide in! ?I know all this sounds very morbid but I would like to tell everyone to have a very happy Diwali but try to be environment friendly this year,? she concluded.
_________________________________________________________________
Explore the seven wonders of the world
http://search.msn.com/results.aspx?q=7+wonders+world&mkt=en-US&form=QBRE
mario rodrigues
2008-10-27 15:07:25 UTC
Permalink
I came across their own values/messages/opinions/teachings of Diwali and thought of sharing them (part of it) with you and with others. Tried to reduce as much as possible. Bit lengthy but worth reading and practising , especially to understand true meaning of diwali. HAPPY DEEPAVALI to ONE AND ALL- Regards-Mario 1. Swami Shivananda SaraswatiThe deeper meaning of Diwali is celebration of the message of Lord Rama?s life of sacrifice and dharma. Lord Rama lived in hardship and exile for 14 years in the forest, it was neither a fun-filled experience nor an easy life, amongst the poorest of the poor in order to fulfill the terms of his father?s debt.Most of you received your education in India before going abroad to earn a living and raise a family. The money that you did not pay came from the poor. You were given free education because they were given nothing. The degree enables him to succeed in the foreign land and to prosper there. The debt is to those who subsidised that education, so that other people could receive that subsidised education at a very small cost. Now that debt must be repaid. In order to repay it, we must make some sacrifice. Remember that is dharma. Sacrifice for the sake of righteousness is the essence of Indian culture. This is the message of Lord Rama?s life. We must not only worship Lord Rama on Diwali; we must also take a pledge to follow him. We must vow to fulfil our own responsibilities, to give back what we have taken from the poor. When we too practise this dharma, we will really have something to celebrate. Indian culture says that we are all one. Indian culture says that as our brothers and sisters suffer in darkness, so we too are suffering, although we may not be aware of it. 2. SWAMI CHIDANANDA SARASWATI We decorate our homes with lanterns; but why? Too many people turn this into a domestic beauty contest, spending days and a great deal of money to purchase the newest dias, the most beautiful candles. ?We had 75 candles burning last night,? we gloat. This is only the light of glamour. It is not the light of God. One piece of cotton soaked in ghee, lit with a pure heart, a conscious mind and an earnest desire to be free from ignorance is far ?brighter? than 100 fashion deepaks, lit in simple unconscious revelry.On this day we clean every room of the house; we dust every corner of the garage, we sweep behind bookshelves, vacuum under beds and empty out cabinets. But, what about our hearts? When was the last time we swept out our hearts? When did we last empty them of all the dirt and garbage that has accumulated throughout our lives?Let us truly clean out our hearts; let us rid ourselves of the grudges, pain, and anger that clutter our ability to love freely.Additionally, on Diwali, we begin a new checkbook; we put last year?s accounts to rest. But, what about our own balance sheets? When was the last time we assessed our minuses and plusses, our strengths and our weaknesses, our good deeds and selfish deeds? How many years? worth of grudges and bitterness and pain have we left unchecked?A good businessman always checks his balance sheet: how much he spent, how much he earned. A good teacher always checks the progress of her students: how many are passing, how many are failing. And they assess themselves accordingly: ?Am I a good businessman?? ?Am I a good teacher?? In the same way we must assess the balance sheets of our lives. Look at the last year. Where do we stand? How many people did we hurt? How many did we heal? How many times did we lose our temper? How many times did we give more than we received? Then, just as we give our past checkbooks and the first check of our new one to God, let us give all our minus and plus points to Him. He is the one responsible for all our good deeds. And our bad ones are due only to ignorance. So, let us turn everything over to Him, putting our strengths, our weaknesses, our wins and our losses at His holy feet. And then, let us start afresh, with a new book, unadulterated by old grudges and bitterness.It is only God?s presence in our lives which makes us rich. Look at India. People in small villages, in holy towns, in ancient cities have very little in terms of material possessions. Most of them live below the Western standards of poverty. Yet, if you tell them they are poor, they won?t believe you, for in their opinion they are not. This is because they have God at the center of their lives. Their homes may not have TV sets, but they all have small mandirs; the children may not know the words to the latest rock and roll song, but they know the words to Aarti; they may not have computers or fancy history text books, but they know the stories of the Ramayana, the Mahabharata and other holy scriptures; they may not begin their days with newspapers, but they begin with prayer.If you go to these villages you may see what looks like poverty to you. But, if you look a little closer, you will see that these people have a light shining in their eyes, a glow on their faces and a song in their hearts that money cannot buy.On Diwali, we must pray to Maha Lakshmi to bestow real prosperity upon us, the prosperity that brings light to our lives and sparkle to our eyes. We must pray for an abundance of faith, not money; we must pray for success in our spiritual lives, not a promotion at work; we must pray for the love of God, not the love of the beautiful girl (or boy) in our class.Let us pray to Maha Lakshmi to bestow the divine gifts of faith, purity and devotion upon us. With those, we will always be always rich, always prosperous, and always fulfilled. Let us celebrate Diwali this year as a true ?holy day,? not only as another frivolous ?holiday.?3. Ms Adah Sharma:-?I personally do not like to unnecessarily torture the environment since it has been very kind to me. I have never burnt/burst crackers as I don?t like to contribute to sound and air pollution.?I am also aware that the children who are roped in to make these crackers in factories are very young (6 to 8 yrs) and by the time they are 14 they?re fingers get eaten up and they are unable to even hold a pen to write.?I have seen stray dogs and other street animals who get petrified with the sound of crackers. They don?t have homes like we do to hide in! ?I know all this sounds very morbid but I would like to tell everyone to have a very happy Diwali but try to be environment friendly this year,? she concluded.
_________________________________________________________________
Explore the seven wonders of the world
http://search.msn.com/results.aspx?q=7+wonders+world&mkt=en-US&form=QBRE
mario rodrigues
2008-10-27 15:07:25 UTC
Permalink
I came across their own values/messages/opinions/teachings of Diwali and thought of sharing them (part of it) with you and with others. Tried to reduce as much as possible. Bit lengthy but worth reading and practising , especially to understand true meaning of diwali. HAPPY DEEPAVALI to ONE AND ALL- Regards-Mario 1. Swami Shivananda SaraswatiThe deeper meaning of Diwali is celebration of the message of Lord Rama?s life of sacrifice and dharma. Lord Rama lived in hardship and exile for 14 years in the forest, it was neither a fun-filled experience nor an easy life, amongst the poorest of the poor in order to fulfill the terms of his father?s debt.Most of you received your education in India before going abroad to earn a living and raise a family. The money that you did not pay came from the poor. You were given free education because they were given nothing. The degree enables him to succeed in the foreign land and to prosper there. The debt is to those who subsidised that education, so that other people could receive that subsidised education at a very small cost. Now that debt must be repaid. In order to repay it, we must make some sacrifice. Remember that is dharma. Sacrifice for the sake of righteousness is the essence of Indian culture. This is the message of Lord Rama?s life. We must not only worship Lord Rama on Diwali; we must also take a pledge to follow him. We must vow to fulfil our own responsibilities, to give back what we have taken from the poor. When we too practise this dharma, we will really have something to celebrate. Indian culture says that we are all one. Indian culture says that as our brothers and sisters suffer in darkness, so we too are suffering, although we may not be aware of it. 2. SWAMI CHIDANANDA SARASWATI We decorate our homes with lanterns; but why? Too many people turn this into a domestic beauty contest, spending days and a great deal of money to purchase the newest dias, the most beautiful candles. ?We had 75 candles burning last night,? we gloat. This is only the light of glamour. It is not the light of God. One piece of cotton soaked in ghee, lit with a pure heart, a conscious mind and an earnest desire to be free from ignorance is far ?brighter? than 100 fashion deepaks, lit in simple unconscious revelry.On this day we clean every room of the house; we dust every corner of the garage, we sweep behind bookshelves, vacuum under beds and empty out cabinets. But, what about our hearts? When was the last time we swept out our hearts? When did we last empty them of all the dirt and garbage that has accumulated throughout our lives?Let us truly clean out our hearts; let us rid ourselves of the grudges, pain, and anger that clutter our ability to love freely.Additionally, on Diwali, we begin a new checkbook; we put last year?s accounts to rest. But, what about our own balance sheets? When was the last time we assessed our minuses and plusses, our strengths and our weaknesses, our good deeds and selfish deeds? How many years? worth of grudges and bitterness and pain have we left unchecked?A good businessman always checks his balance sheet: how much he spent, how much he earned. A good teacher always checks the progress of her students: how many are passing, how many are failing. And they assess themselves accordingly: ?Am I a good businessman?? ?Am I a good teacher?? In the same way we must assess the balance sheets of our lives. Look at the last year. Where do we stand? How many people did we hurt? How many did we heal? How many times did we lose our temper? How many times did we give more than we received? Then, just as we give our past checkbooks and the first check of our new one to God, let us give all our minus and plus points to Him. He is the one responsible for all our good deeds. And our bad ones are due only to ignorance. So, let us turn everything over to Him, putting our strengths, our weaknesses, our wins and our losses at His holy feet. And then, let us start afresh, with a new book, unadulterated by old grudges and bitterness.It is only God?s presence in our lives which makes us rich. Look at India. People in small villages, in holy towns, in ancient cities have very little in terms of material possessions. Most of them live below the Western standards of poverty. Yet, if you tell them they are poor, they won?t believe you, for in their opinion they are not. This is because they have God at the center of their lives. Their homes may not have TV sets, but they all have small mandirs; the children may not know the words to the latest rock and roll song, but they know the words to Aarti; they may not have computers or fancy history text books, but they know the stories of the Ramayana, the Mahabharata and other holy scriptures; they may not begin their days with newspapers, but they begin with prayer.If you go to these villages you may see what looks like poverty to you. But, if you look a little closer, you will see that these people have a light shining in their eyes, a glow on their faces and a song in their hearts that money cannot buy.On Diwali, we must pray to Maha Lakshmi to bestow real prosperity upon us, the prosperity that brings light to our lives and sparkle to our eyes. We must pray for an abundance of faith, not money; we must pray for success in our spiritual lives, not a promotion at work; we must pray for the love of God, not the love of the beautiful girl (or boy) in our class.Let us pray to Maha Lakshmi to bestow the divine gifts of faith, purity and devotion upon us. With those, we will always be always rich, always prosperous, and always fulfilled. Let us celebrate Diwali this year as a true ?holy day,? not only as another frivolous ?holiday.?3. Ms Adah Sharma:-?I personally do not like to unnecessarily torture the environment since it has been very kind to me. I have never burnt/burst crackers as I don?t like to contribute to sound and air pollution.?I am also aware that the children who are roped in to make these crackers in factories are very young (6 to 8 yrs) and by the time they are 14 they?re fingers get eaten up and they are unable to even hold a pen to write.?I have seen stray dogs and other street animals who get petrified with the sound of crackers. They don?t have homes like we do to hide in! ?I know all this sounds very morbid but I would like to tell everyone to have a very happy Diwali but try to be environment friendly this year,? she concluded.
_________________________________________________________________
Explore the seven wonders of the world
http://search.msn.com/results.aspx?q=7+wonders+world&mkt=en-US&form=QBRE
mario rodrigues
2008-10-27 15:07:25 UTC
Permalink
I came across their own values/messages/opinions/teachings of Diwali and thought of sharing them (part of it) with you and with others. Tried to reduce as much as possible. Bit lengthy but worth reading and practising , especially to understand true meaning of diwali. HAPPY DEEPAVALI to ONE AND ALL- Regards-Mario 1. Swami Shivananda SaraswatiThe deeper meaning of Diwali is celebration of the message of Lord Rama?s life of sacrifice and dharma. Lord Rama lived in hardship and exile for 14 years in the forest, it was neither a fun-filled experience nor an easy life, amongst the poorest of the poor in order to fulfill the terms of his father?s debt.Most of you received your education in India before going abroad to earn a living and raise a family. The money that you did not pay came from the poor. You were given free education because they were given nothing. The degree enables him to succeed in the foreign land and to prosper there. The debt is to those who subsidised that education, so that other people could receive that subsidised education at a very small cost. Now that debt must be repaid. In order to repay it, we must make some sacrifice. Remember that is dharma. Sacrifice for the sake of righteousness is the essence of Indian culture. This is the message of Lord Rama?s life. We must not only worship Lord Rama on Diwali; we must also take a pledge to follow him. We must vow to fulfil our own responsibilities, to give back what we have taken from the poor. When we too practise this dharma, we will really have something to celebrate. Indian culture says that we are all one. Indian culture says that as our brothers and sisters suffer in darkness, so we too are suffering, although we may not be aware of it. 2. SWAMI CHIDANANDA SARASWATI We decorate our homes with lanterns; but why? Too many people turn this into a domestic beauty contest, spending days and a great deal of money to purchase the newest dias, the most beautiful candles. ?We had 75 candles burning last night,? we gloat. This is only the light of glamour. It is not the light of God. One piece of cotton soaked in ghee, lit with a pure heart, a conscious mind and an earnest desire to be free from ignorance is far ?brighter? than 100 fashion deepaks, lit in simple unconscious revelry.On this day we clean every room of the house; we dust every corner of the garage, we sweep behind bookshelves, vacuum under beds and empty out cabinets. But, what about our hearts? When was the last time we swept out our hearts? When did we last empty them of all the dirt and garbage that has accumulated throughout our lives?Let us truly clean out our hearts; let us rid ourselves of the grudges, pain, and anger that clutter our ability to love freely.Additionally, on Diwali, we begin a new checkbook; we put last year?s accounts to rest. But, what about our own balance sheets? When was the last time we assessed our minuses and plusses, our strengths and our weaknesses, our good deeds and selfish deeds? How many years? worth of grudges and bitterness and pain have we left unchecked?A good businessman always checks his balance sheet: how much he spent, how much he earned. A good teacher always checks the progress of her students: how many are passing, how many are failing. And they assess themselves accordingly: ?Am I a good businessman?? ?Am I a good teacher?? In the same way we must assess the balance sheets of our lives. Look at the last year. Where do we stand? How many people did we hurt? How many did we heal? How many times did we lose our temper? How many times did we give more than we received? Then, just as we give our past checkbooks and the first check of our new one to God, let us give all our minus and plus points to Him. He is the one responsible for all our good deeds. And our bad ones are due only to ignorance. So, let us turn everything over to Him, putting our strengths, our weaknesses, our wins and our losses at His holy feet. And then, let us start afresh, with a new book, unadulterated by old grudges and bitterness.It is only God?s presence in our lives which makes us rich. Look at India. People in small villages, in holy towns, in ancient cities have very little in terms of material possessions. Most of them live below the Western standards of poverty. Yet, if you tell them they are poor, they won?t believe you, for in their opinion they are not. This is because they have God at the center of their lives. Their homes may not have TV sets, but they all have small mandirs; the children may not know the words to the latest rock and roll song, but they know the words to Aarti; they may not have computers or fancy history text books, but they know the stories of the Ramayana, the Mahabharata and other holy scriptures; they may not begin their days with newspapers, but they begin with prayer.If you go to these villages you may see what looks like poverty to you. But, if you look a little closer, you will see that these people have a light shining in their eyes, a glow on their faces and a song in their hearts that money cannot buy.On Diwali, we must pray to Maha Lakshmi to bestow real prosperity upon us, the prosperity that brings light to our lives and sparkle to our eyes. We must pray for an abundance of faith, not money; we must pray for success in our spiritual lives, not a promotion at work; we must pray for the love of God, not the love of the beautiful girl (or boy) in our class.Let us pray to Maha Lakshmi to bestow the divine gifts of faith, purity and devotion upon us. With those, we will always be always rich, always prosperous, and always fulfilled. Let us celebrate Diwali this year as a true ?holy day,? not only as another frivolous ?holiday.?3. Ms Adah Sharma:-?I personally do not like to unnecessarily torture the environment since it has been very kind to me. I have never burnt/burst crackers as I don?t like to contribute to sound and air pollution.?I am also aware that the children who are roped in to make these crackers in factories are very young (6 to 8 yrs) and by the time they are 14 they?re fingers get eaten up and they are unable to even hold a pen to write.?I have seen stray dogs and other street animals who get petrified with the sound of crackers. They don?t have homes like we do to hide in! ?I know all this sounds very morbid but I would like to tell everyone to have a very happy Diwali but try to be environment friendly this year,? she concluded.
_________________________________________________________________
Explore the seven wonders of the world
http://search.msn.com/results.aspx?q=7+wonders+world&mkt=en-US&form=QBRE
mario rodrigues
2008-10-27 15:07:25 UTC
Permalink
I came across their own values/messages/opinions/teachings of Diwali and thought of sharing them (part of it) with you and with others. Tried to reduce as much as possible. Bit lengthy but worth reading and practising , especially to understand true meaning of diwali. HAPPY DEEPAVALI to ONE AND ALL- Regards-Mario 1. Swami Shivananda SaraswatiThe deeper meaning of Diwali is celebration of the message of Lord Rama?s life of sacrifice and dharma. Lord Rama lived in hardship and exile for 14 years in the forest, it was neither a fun-filled experience nor an easy life, amongst the poorest of the poor in order to fulfill the terms of his father?s debt.Most of you received your education in India before going abroad to earn a living and raise a family. The money that you did not pay came from the poor. You were given free education because they were given nothing. The degree enables him to succeed in the foreign land and to prosper there. The debt is to those who subsidised that education, so that other people could receive that subsidised education at a very small cost. Now that debt must be repaid. In order to repay it, we must make some sacrifice. Remember that is dharma. Sacrifice for the sake of righteousness is the essence of Indian culture. This is the message of Lord Rama?s life. We must not only worship Lord Rama on Diwali; we must also take a pledge to follow him. We must vow to fulfil our own responsibilities, to give back what we have taken from the poor. When we too practise this dharma, we will really have something to celebrate. Indian culture says that we are all one. Indian culture says that as our brothers and sisters suffer in darkness, so we too are suffering, although we may not be aware of it. 2. SWAMI CHIDANANDA SARASWATI We decorate our homes with lanterns; but why? Too many people turn this into a domestic beauty contest, spending days and a great deal of money to purchase the newest dias, the most beautiful candles. ?We had 75 candles burning last night,? we gloat. This is only the light of glamour. It is not the light of God. One piece of cotton soaked in ghee, lit with a pure heart, a conscious mind and an earnest desire to be free from ignorance is far ?brighter? than 100 fashion deepaks, lit in simple unconscious revelry.On this day we clean every room of the house; we dust every corner of the garage, we sweep behind bookshelves, vacuum under beds and empty out cabinets. But, what about our hearts? When was the last time we swept out our hearts? When did we last empty them of all the dirt and garbage that has accumulated throughout our lives?Let us truly clean out our hearts; let us rid ourselves of the grudges, pain, and anger that clutter our ability to love freely.Additionally, on Diwali, we begin a new checkbook; we put last year?s accounts to rest. But, what about our own balance sheets? When was the last time we assessed our minuses and plusses, our strengths and our weaknesses, our good deeds and selfish deeds? How many years? worth of grudges and bitterness and pain have we left unchecked?A good businessman always checks his balance sheet: how much he spent, how much he earned. A good teacher always checks the progress of her students: how many are passing, how many are failing. And they assess themselves accordingly: ?Am I a good businessman?? ?Am I a good teacher?? In the same way we must assess the balance sheets of our lives. Look at the last year. Where do we stand? How many people did we hurt? How many did we heal? How many times did we lose our temper? How many times did we give more than we received? Then, just as we give our past checkbooks and the first check of our new one to God, let us give all our minus and plus points to Him. He is the one responsible for all our good deeds. And our bad ones are due only to ignorance. So, let us turn everything over to Him, putting our strengths, our weaknesses, our wins and our losses at His holy feet. And then, let us start afresh, with a new book, unadulterated by old grudges and bitterness.It is only God?s presence in our lives which makes us rich. Look at India. People in small villages, in holy towns, in ancient cities have very little in terms of material possessions. Most of them live below the Western standards of poverty. Yet, if you tell them they are poor, they won?t believe you, for in their opinion they are not. This is because they have God at the center of their lives. Their homes may not have TV sets, but they all have small mandirs; the children may not know the words to the latest rock and roll song, but they know the words to Aarti; they may not have computers or fancy history text books, but they know the stories of the Ramayana, the Mahabharata and other holy scriptures; they may not begin their days with newspapers, but they begin with prayer.If you go to these villages you may see what looks like poverty to you. But, if you look a little closer, you will see that these people have a light shining in their eyes, a glow on their faces and a song in their hearts that money cannot buy.On Diwali, we must pray to Maha Lakshmi to bestow real prosperity upon us, the prosperity that brings light to our lives and sparkle to our eyes. We must pray for an abundance of faith, not money; we must pray for success in our spiritual lives, not a promotion at work; we must pray for the love of God, not the love of the beautiful girl (or boy) in our class.Let us pray to Maha Lakshmi to bestow the divine gifts of faith, purity and devotion upon us. With those, we will always be always rich, always prosperous, and always fulfilled. Let us celebrate Diwali this year as a true ?holy day,? not only as another frivolous ?holiday.?3. Ms Adah Sharma:-?I personally do not like to unnecessarily torture the environment since it has been very kind to me. I have never burnt/burst crackers as I don?t like to contribute to sound and air pollution.?I am also aware that the children who are roped in to make these crackers in factories are very young (6 to 8 yrs) and by the time they are 14 they?re fingers get eaten up and they are unable to even hold a pen to write.?I have seen stray dogs and other street animals who get petrified with the sound of crackers. They don?t have homes like we do to hide in! ?I know all this sounds very morbid but I would like to tell everyone to have a very happy Diwali but try to be environment friendly this year,? she concluded.
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mario rodrigues
2008-10-27 15:07:25 UTC
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I came across their own values/messages/opinions/teachings of Diwali and thought of sharing them (part of it) with you and with others. Tried to reduce as much as possible. Bit lengthy but worth reading and practising , especially to understand true meaning of diwali. HAPPY DEEPAVALI to ONE AND ALL- Regards-Mario 1. Swami Shivananda SaraswatiThe deeper meaning of Diwali is celebration of the message of Lord Rama?s life of sacrifice and dharma. Lord Rama lived in hardship and exile for 14 years in the forest, it was neither a fun-filled experience nor an easy life, amongst the poorest of the poor in order to fulfill the terms of his father?s debt.Most of you received your education in India before going abroad to earn a living and raise a family. The money that you did not pay came from the poor. You were given free education because they were given nothing. The degree enables him to succeed in the foreign land and to prosper there. The debt is to those who subsidised that education, so that other people could receive that subsidised education at a very small cost. Now that debt must be repaid. In order to repay it, we must make some sacrifice. Remember that is dharma. Sacrifice for the sake of righteousness is the essence of Indian culture. This is the message of Lord Rama?s life. We must not only worship Lord Rama on Diwali; we must also take a pledge to follow him. We must vow to fulfil our own responsibilities, to give back what we have taken from the poor. When we too practise this dharma, we will really have something to celebrate. Indian culture says that we are all one. Indian culture says that as our brothers and sisters suffer in darkness, so we too are suffering, although we may not be aware of it. 2. SWAMI CHIDANANDA SARASWATI We decorate our homes with lanterns; but why? Too many people turn this into a domestic beauty contest, spending days and a great deal of money to purchase the newest dias, the most beautiful candles. ?We had 75 candles burning last night,? we gloat. This is only the light of glamour. It is not the light of God. One piece of cotton soaked in ghee, lit with a pure heart, a conscious mind and an earnest desire to be free from ignorance is far ?brighter? than 100 fashion deepaks, lit in simple unconscious revelry.On this day we clean every room of the house; we dust every corner of the garage, we sweep behind bookshelves, vacuum under beds and empty out cabinets. But, what about our hearts? When was the last time we swept out our hearts? When did we last empty them of all the dirt and garbage that has accumulated throughout our lives?Let us truly clean out our hearts; let us rid ourselves of the grudges, pain, and anger that clutter our ability to love freely.Additionally, on Diwali, we begin a new checkbook; we put last year?s accounts to rest. But, what about our own balance sheets? When was the last time we assessed our minuses and plusses, our strengths and our weaknesses, our good deeds and selfish deeds? How many years? worth of grudges and bitterness and pain have we left unchecked?A good businessman always checks his balance sheet: how much he spent, how much he earned. A good teacher always checks the progress of her students: how many are passing, how many are failing. And they assess themselves accordingly: ?Am I a good businessman?? ?Am I a good teacher?? In the same way we must assess the balance sheets of our lives. Look at the last year. Where do we stand? How many people did we hurt? How many did we heal? How many times did we lose our temper? How many times did we give more than we received? Then, just as we give our past checkbooks and the first check of our new one to God, let us give all our minus and plus points to Him. He is the one responsible for all our good deeds. And our bad ones are due only to ignorance. So, let us turn everything over to Him, putting our strengths, our weaknesses, our wins and our losses at His holy feet. And then, let us start afresh, with a new book, unadulterated by old grudges and bitterness.It is only God?s presence in our lives which makes us rich. Look at India. People in small villages, in holy towns, in ancient cities have very little in terms of material possessions. Most of them live below the Western standards of poverty. Yet, if you tell them they are poor, they won?t believe you, for in their opinion they are not. This is because they have God at the center of their lives. Their homes may not have TV sets, but they all have small mandirs; the children may not know the words to the latest rock and roll song, but they know the words to Aarti; they may not have computers or fancy history text books, but they know the stories of the Ramayana, the Mahabharata and other holy scriptures; they may not begin their days with newspapers, but they begin with prayer.If you go to these villages you may see what looks like poverty to you. But, if you look a little closer, you will see that these people have a light shining in their eyes, a glow on their faces and a song in their hearts that money cannot buy.On Diwali, we must pray to Maha Lakshmi to bestow real prosperity upon us, the prosperity that brings light to our lives and sparkle to our eyes. We must pray for an abundance of faith, not money; we must pray for success in our spiritual lives, not a promotion at work; we must pray for the love of God, not the love of the beautiful girl (or boy) in our class.Let us pray to Maha Lakshmi to bestow the divine gifts of faith, purity and devotion upon us. With those, we will always be always rich, always prosperous, and always fulfilled. Let us celebrate Diwali this year as a true ?holy day,? not only as another frivolous ?holiday.?3. Ms Adah Sharma:-?I personally do not like to unnecessarily torture the environment since it has been very kind to me. I have never burnt/burst crackers as I don?t like to contribute to sound and air pollution.?I am also aware that the children who are roped in to make these crackers in factories are very young (6 to 8 yrs) and by the time they are 14 they?re fingers get eaten up and they are unable to even hold a pen to write.?I have seen stray dogs and other street animals who get petrified with the sound of crackers. They don?t have homes like we do to hide in! ?I know all this sounds very morbid but I would like to tell everyone to have a very happy Diwali but try to be environment friendly this year,? she concluded.
_________________________________________________________________
Explore the seven wonders of the world
http://search.msn.com/results.aspx?q=7+wonders+world&mkt=en-US&form=QBRE
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