Discussion:
04 MAY 2003: GOACOM DAILY NEWS CLIPPINGS
(too old to reply)
Floriano Lobo
2000-12-31 19:43:49 UTC
Permalink
Edgar,
The helmets problem is a problem for Goa.
You are talking of countries where two wheelers are used by a selected few
for reasons other than pure transportation.
We have Mumbai, a city of approx 15 million people. What do you think is
the statistics of this city with respect to the registered two wheelers?
Very low perhaps. Why? Because Mumbai has a very effective mode of public
transport, the public transport that never sleeps. And if it did, Mumbai
would a hell to be in. People do not need to have their own transport. You
get out from your flat or whatever, you hail a cab if your pocket suits you.
Otherwise you hail a rick or take the bus to the station. Then you ride
miles and miles to your destination to and fro in minutes which would
otherwise take you hours on end. (even by bus). Therefore, for pure
economics and convenience, the population of two wheelers is down in Mumbai.
And in Mumbai the Government can make it mandatory for two wheeler riders to
wear helmets. I really do not know if this is so, for I have never seen any
great bulk of two wheelers there like in Goa.

Now take the case of Goa. Two wheeler is a family transport mode. The public
transport is in shambles. Given the terrain of Goa, two wheelers family
transportation is a must for low middle income families. In far away/remote
areas, the only practical mode of transport is a two wheeler. Your son or
your daughter , otherwise, will never reach college or even in some cases
to school in time. Every child wants a scooty to go to college or to
school. And in the absence of a well catered-for public transport, this
demand is increasing steadily. That is why you see more and more two wheeler
showrooms coming up in Goa. With the rip-off prices that these two
wheelers command, do they give away a helmet with the two wheeler? NOPE. You
have to buy one. That too is 99.999 % absolutely substandard and will crack
if it merely falls down. Plus we have two wheeler taxis too. If the
government makes helmets mandatory, that will mean a family of 4 (2 + 2
tots) will have to invest in 4 helmets. Do they make helmets for minors?
That means the government will have to ban carriage of children on two
wheelers if they make helmets mandatory. And where do you park the four
helmets when you park the two wheeler? You can say goodbye to the helmets if
you even lock them on the bike. So you tote you 2 tots as well as tote 4
helmets. And how do you make children to use the helmets? And does a
government department or a private company allocate place to store your
helmets? In all probability, they would have to have an extra room with an
extra guard. Is it viable?

My brother died fro a cracked skull in spite of wearing an expensive chin
guard helmet and with a mania for wearing helmet as big as life itself. It
was manufactured in INDIA. The best export quality helmets from India tested
by an international firm (SWISS) have failed miserably, even along with some
US models.

The government is in no position to enforce the mandatory helmets rule in
Goa. Let us face the facts. The government will first have to streamline the
manufacture of helmets that can withstand stringent tests. Otherwise the
Government of Goa will have to put in place a very effective urban as well
as rural public transportation system that will be up from 5 AM to 12 PM.
Or
The government should come out with a legislation that no ex-gratia payment
will be made to any two wheeler accident victim if found not wearing helmet
at the time of accident, whether it was a head injury or not.

Therefore, under the circumstances, you decide if any government in Goa can
afford to make helmets mandatory with prevailing conditions.

As for Goasuraj, we have decided that we will put a state of the art public
transport system at the hand of its people where not only two wheelers will
be a burden for the households, even 4 wheelers will be reduced in time to
come.

It could well be a very "wishful thinking" bordering on bluff, but then
that is all we have to our account. We believe that if we start with a sound
and persistent idea, it will bear fruit in time to come.

Cheers
Floriano
<<
Re; Wearing a Helmet
The responsibility of wearing a helmet when driving a two-wheeler is
that of the driver and his/her family (parents, spouse, children and
other first degree relatives) who permit him or her to do so! Crying at
the funeral and blaming the government and others for this fatal (and
preventable) accident is fruitless and non-productive. At this point we
can only learn for the accident. Regards, GL
This is the most ignorant posting I have read for a long time. He who
has composed this is bereft of logic. He never asks what the government is
there for. I live in a country that legislates for the good of its
citizens.
Let me tell this knucklehead a law in what a Goan erroneously considers a
backward country.
That country is Trinidad which though tiny, has produced a Nobel
Prize winner for literature, a world class sprinter and a batsman on par
with
Sachin Tendulkar.
After 7 p.m. a cyclist must have a light. I mean a cyclist and not a
motorcyclist. If a rider has a puncture and has no lights, he must lift
the
bike on his head and not move it with the wheels on the road.
I have said that Goans have a proclivity for thieving. They also
like
to argue. Where on earth has one seen the antics of two wheel riders. They
ride side by side on Goan roads while chatting. Most accidents on Goa's
roads
are due to the carelessness of the drivers. Goans must learn to obey
orders
and the law in particular. As Dr. Colaco has written, they have hard heads
and Mr. Lawrence, you are no exception. I have no patience for nonsence
and I
will say so. Cecil and Aiyres share this distinction with you.
Edgar Martins
Floriano Lobo
2000-12-31 20:14:10 UTC
Permalink
If you wait for the Government to provide an infrastructure and tip top bus
service, there will
be no passengers to ride the busses (when Goa Suraj comes to power) as
people
in graves do not need to move.
That would, indeed, be an ideal situation to take over the reins of Goa
from the BJP, the Congress, the MGP and the UGDP. IF THAT HAPPENED.

In that case, there would be no opposition to the "wear Helmet" rule. For
that matter Goa Su-Raj Government can go ahead and do whatever it liked and
there would be no opposition at all. It could ban the two wheeler pilots in
the first place. It could make "work helmets" mandatory for all industrial
units. It could even bring in the "wear helmet" rule for the cyclists. It
could clear all roads of illegal and legal encroachments including religious
places of worship and make roads safer for beautiful empty buses to drive.
It could even bannish the PWD and the Telecom Department from the soil of
Goa for being the biggest culprits in populating the graveyards. It could
send all the strays from the roads packing to the houses and bungalows of
the friends of the strays who help the PWD and the Telecom Department . It
could even send all the Goan bus drivers on a deputation to BEST of Mumbai
and bring in the BEST bus drivers to take over the buses in Goa. We could
sack the Transport Minister and all the RTOs over and over again until they
wisen up to the road etc. safety. And we could make the auto industry (two
wheeler manufacturers) to give away two adult helmets and one child helmet
free with the sale of each two wheeler. And we could order some brand new
backbones from Italy, Germany, Japan, USA what have you and give them free
of cost to our politicians and bureaucrats so they could take firm steps to
implement all the marvelous rules, regulations and laws that Goa Su-Raj will
bring in to make Goa that extra little peaceful for all those beautiful
people in the graveyards who will neve rise up on the election day to cast
their votes against it, to send it back to the limbo again.

Dear Edgar,
What we require is the will of STEEL in our politicians to come out with
rules and the backbones to implement them without the bother of counting
votes. I am still to see a defiant violator of the rules if the whip is a
coming to crack on the bare back. And this is what, not only Goa requires,
but INDIA requires badly. Unfortunately, Sir Winston Churchill was right
when he had predicted backbones full of straw in our Indian Politicians way
back in 1947. And I am proud to have been born in that year of accurate
prediction.

And, I am really very happy today that Sanjit Rodrigues has qualified to
take over as the Commissioner of the Panjim Municipal Corporation. If we see
some of the much missing 'steel' in the bureaucratic backbones, it is in
Sanjit's.

Cheers
Floriano

******
I fully agree and endorse GL's views.
A simple solution to a complex helmets problem.
Floriano.
Re; Wearing a Helmet
The responsibility of wearing a helmet when driving a two-wheeler is
that of the driver and his/her family (parents, spouse, children and
other first degree relatives) who permit him or her to do so! Crying at
the funeral and blaming the government and others for this fatal (and
preventable) accident is fruitless and non-productive. At this point we
can only learn for the accident. Regards, GL
#####################################################################
Floriano, I see a fluctuation in your views. You do not contradict
me
but put new obstacles in the path of progress. Let me explain.
You put the onus above on the family to see that a two whell rider
wears a helmet. Then you go into a polemical discussion on the
shortcomings
of the government who do not provide adequate busses and tell us that if
and
when Goans have a Goa Suraj government the people of Goa will not need two
wheelers. Furthermore, you criticize the standard and quality of helmets
sold
in Goa. Here is something for you to reflect on. I have lived in Goa when
busses ran eratically and they were not comfortable. I walked and did not
complain for this would not alleviate my situation. Today, the situation
is
much improved, believe me. Stop complaining. The Government (RTA) must
swindle money and hence, we lack the resourses to obviate this helmet
problem.
I own a scooter and I took a helmet with me to Goa. Many who have
died due to head injuries did not wear a helmet, not because the quality
of
the helmets sold in Goa was poor but because they felt comfortable without
one. Austin Soares often travelled abroad and his wife is an Aussie. I
have
just had an e-mail from a lady who rides a bike daily and writes to say
that
due to the heat her head itched and she has discontinued the habit. But
now
she swears that she will wear one.
I have never maintained that everyone wearing a helmet will be
saved
from death. Other factors are involved like the impact of the collission
and
the speed of the moving object. It is like sitting in a bus without a
guarantee that you will be saved if you sat at the back, front or the side
of
the bus. Same goes with planes.
1. Is wearing a helmet safer than not wearing one?
2. Should the taxpayer be responsible to defray the cost of the
ambulance and treatment?
3. Is there no trauma and stress borne by the family? Do you feel
that
the children should cope without a bread winner?
I am grieved that your brother who wore a helmet died. I maintain
that
even a paper mache helmet is better than no helmet. If you wait for the
Government to provide an infrastructure and tip top bus service, there
will
be no passengers to ride the busses (when Goa Suraj comes to power) as
people
in graves do not need to move.
Above all, we as Goans must learn discipline and not rebel (and argue)
at
every opportunity. There are virtues in obeying parents and government
laws
even if they are wrong. There is much to say of a kid who disobeys his
parents even if what he is asked to perform is wrong. From obeying we
learn
discipline and from discipline we learn to reason.
Edgar Martins
Floriano Lobo
2000-12-31 19:43:49 UTC
Permalink
Edgar,
The helmets problem is a problem for Goa.
You are talking of countries where two wheelers are used by a selected few
for reasons other than pure transportation.
We have Mumbai, a city of approx 15 million people. What do you think is
the statistics of this city with respect to the registered two wheelers?
Very low perhaps. Why? Because Mumbai has a very effective mode of public
transport, the public transport that never sleeps. And if it did, Mumbai
would a hell to be in. People do not need to have their own transport. You
get out from your flat or whatever, you hail a cab if your pocket suits you.
Otherwise you hail a rick or take the bus to the station. Then you ride
miles and miles to your destination to and fro in minutes which would
otherwise take you hours on end. (even by bus). Therefore, for pure
economics and convenience, the population of two wheelers is down in Mumbai.
And in Mumbai the Government can make it mandatory for two wheeler riders to
wear helmets. I really do not know if this is so, for I have never seen any
great bulk of two wheelers there like in Goa.

Now take the case of Goa. Two wheeler is a family transport mode. The public
transport is in shambles. Given the terrain of Goa, two wheelers family
transportation is a must for low middle income families. In far away/remote
areas, the only practical mode of transport is a two wheeler. Your son or
your daughter , otherwise, will never reach college or even in some cases
to school in time. Every child wants a scooty to go to college or to
school. And in the absence of a well catered-for public transport, this
demand is increasing steadily. That is why you see more and more two wheeler
showrooms coming up in Goa. With the rip-off prices that these two
wheelers command, do they give away a helmet with the two wheeler? NOPE. You
have to buy one. That too is 99.999 % absolutely substandard and will crack
if it merely falls down. Plus we have two wheeler taxis too. If the
government makes helmets mandatory, that will mean a family of 4 (2 + 2
tots) will have to invest in 4 helmets. Do they make helmets for minors?
That means the government will have to ban carriage of children on two
wheelers if they make helmets mandatory. And where do you park the four
helmets when you park the two wheeler? You can say goodbye to the helmets if
you even lock them on the bike. So you tote you 2 tots as well as tote 4
helmets. And how do you make children to use the helmets? And does a
government department or a private company allocate place to store your
helmets? In all probability, they would have to have an extra room with an
extra guard. Is it viable?

My brother died fro a cracked skull in spite of wearing an expensive chin
guard helmet and with a mania for wearing helmet as big as life itself. It
was manufactured in INDIA. The best export quality helmets from India tested
by an international firm (SWISS) have failed miserably, even along with some
US models.

The government is in no position to enforce the mandatory helmets rule in
Goa. Let us face the facts. The government will first have to streamline the
manufacture of helmets that can withstand stringent tests. Otherwise the
Government of Goa will have to put in place a very effective urban as well
as rural public transportation system that will be up from 5 AM to 12 PM.
Or
The government should come out with a legislation that no ex-gratia payment
will be made to any two wheeler accident victim if found not wearing helmet
at the time of accident, whether it was a head injury or not.

Therefore, under the circumstances, you decide if any government in Goa can
afford to make helmets mandatory with prevailing conditions.

As for Goasuraj, we have decided that we will put a state of the art public
transport system at the hand of its people where not only two wheelers will
be a burden for the households, even 4 wheelers will be reduced in time to
come.

It could well be a very "wishful thinking" bordering on bluff, but then
that is all we have to our account. We believe that if we start with a sound
and persistent idea, it will bear fruit in time to come.

Cheers
Floriano
<<
Re; Wearing a Helmet
The responsibility of wearing a helmet when driving a two-wheeler is
that of the driver and his/her family (parents, spouse, children and
other first degree relatives) who permit him or her to do so! Crying at
the funeral and blaming the government and others for this fatal (and
preventable) accident is fruitless and non-productive. At this point we
can only learn for the accident. Regards, GL
This is the most ignorant posting I have read for a long time. He who
has composed this is bereft of logic. He never asks what the government is
there for. I live in a country that legislates for the good of its
citizens.
Let me tell this knucklehead a law in what a Goan erroneously considers a
backward country.
That country is Trinidad which though tiny, has produced a Nobel
Prize winner for literature, a world class sprinter and a batsman on par
with
Sachin Tendulkar.
After 7 p.m. a cyclist must have a light. I mean a cyclist and not a
motorcyclist. If a rider has a puncture and has no lights, he must lift
the
bike on his head and not move it with the wheels on the road.
I have said that Goans have a proclivity for thieving. They also
like
to argue. Where on earth has one seen the antics of two wheel riders. They
ride side by side on Goan roads while chatting. Most accidents on Goa's
roads
are due to the carelessness of the drivers. Goans must learn to obey
orders
and the law in particular. As Dr. Colaco has written, they have hard heads
and Mr. Lawrence, you are no exception. I have no patience for nonsence
and I
will say so. Cecil and Aiyres share this distinction with you.
Edgar Martins
Floriano Lobo
2000-12-31 20:14:10 UTC
Permalink
If you wait for the Government to provide an infrastructure and tip top bus
service, there will
be no passengers to ride the busses (when Goa Suraj comes to power) as
people
in graves do not need to move.
That would, indeed, be an ideal situation to take over the reins of Goa
from the BJP, the Congress, the MGP and the UGDP. IF THAT HAPPENED.

In that case, there would be no opposition to the "wear Helmet" rule. For
that matter Goa Su-Raj Government can go ahead and do whatever it liked and
there would be no opposition at all. It could ban the two wheeler pilots in
the first place. It could make "work helmets" mandatory for all industrial
units. It could even bring in the "wear helmet" rule for the cyclists. It
could clear all roads of illegal and legal encroachments including religious
places of worship and make roads safer for beautiful empty buses to drive.
It could even bannish the PWD and the Telecom Department from the soil of
Goa for being the biggest culprits in populating the graveyards. It could
send all the strays from the roads packing to the houses and bungalows of
the friends of the strays who help the PWD and the Telecom Department . It
could even send all the Goan bus drivers on a deputation to BEST of Mumbai
and bring in the BEST bus drivers to take over the buses in Goa. We could
sack the Transport Minister and all the RTOs over and over again until they
wisen up to the road etc. safety. And we could make the auto industry (two
wheeler manufacturers) to give away two adult helmets and one child helmet
free with the sale of each two wheeler. And we could order some brand new
backbones from Italy, Germany, Japan, USA what have you and give them free
of cost to our politicians and bureaucrats so they could take firm steps to
implement all the marvelous rules, regulations and laws that Goa Su-Raj will
bring in to make Goa that extra little peaceful for all those beautiful
people in the graveyards who will neve rise up on the election day to cast
their votes against it, to send it back to the limbo again.

Dear Edgar,
What we require is the will of STEEL in our politicians to come out with
rules and the backbones to implement them without the bother of counting
votes. I am still to see a defiant violator of the rules if the whip is a
coming to crack on the bare back. And this is what, not only Goa requires,
but INDIA requires badly. Unfortunately, Sir Winston Churchill was right
when he had predicted backbones full of straw in our Indian Politicians way
back in 1947. And I am proud to have been born in that year of accurate
prediction.

And, I am really very happy today that Sanjit Rodrigues has qualified to
take over as the Commissioner of the Panjim Municipal Corporation. If we see
some of the much missing 'steel' in the bureaucratic backbones, it is in
Sanjit's.

Cheers
Floriano

******
I fully agree and endorse GL's views.
A simple solution to a complex helmets problem.
Floriano.
Re; Wearing a Helmet
The responsibility of wearing a helmet when driving a two-wheeler is
that of the driver and his/her family (parents, spouse, children and
other first degree relatives) who permit him or her to do so! Crying at
the funeral and blaming the government and others for this fatal (and
preventable) accident is fruitless and non-productive. At this point we
can only learn for the accident. Regards, GL
#####################################################################
Floriano, I see a fluctuation in your views. You do not contradict
me
but put new obstacles in the path of progress. Let me explain.
You put the onus above on the family to see that a two whell rider
wears a helmet. Then you go into a polemical discussion on the
shortcomings
of the government who do not provide adequate busses and tell us that if
and
when Goans have a Goa Suraj government the people of Goa will not need two
wheelers. Furthermore, you criticize the standard and quality of helmets
sold
in Goa. Here is something for you to reflect on. I have lived in Goa when
busses ran eratically and they were not comfortable. I walked and did not
complain for this would not alleviate my situation. Today, the situation
is
much improved, believe me. Stop complaining. The Government (RTA) must
swindle money and hence, we lack the resourses to obviate this helmet
problem.
I own a scooter and I took a helmet with me to Goa. Many who have
died due to head injuries did not wear a helmet, not because the quality
of
the helmets sold in Goa was poor but because they felt comfortable without
one. Austin Soares often travelled abroad and his wife is an Aussie. I
have
just had an e-mail from a lady who rides a bike daily and writes to say
that
due to the heat her head itched and she has discontinued the habit. But
now
she swears that she will wear one.
I have never maintained that everyone wearing a helmet will be
saved
from death. Other factors are involved like the impact of the collission
and
the speed of the moving object. It is like sitting in a bus without a
guarantee that you will be saved if you sat at the back, front or the side
of
the bus. Same goes with planes.
1. Is wearing a helmet safer than not wearing one?
2. Should the taxpayer be responsible to defray the cost of the
ambulance and treatment?
3. Is there no trauma and stress borne by the family? Do you feel
that
the children should cope without a bread winner?
I am grieved that your brother who wore a helmet died. I maintain
that
even a paper mache helmet is better than no helmet. If you wait for the
Government to provide an infrastructure and tip top bus service, there
will
be no passengers to ride the busses (when Goa Suraj comes to power) as
people
in graves do not need to move.
Above all, we as Goans must learn discipline and not rebel (and argue)
at
every opportunity. There are virtues in obeying parents and government
laws
even if they are wrong. There is much to say of a kid who disobeys his
parents even if what he is asked to perform is wrong. From obeying we
learn
discipline and from discipline we learn to reason.
Edgar Martins
Floriano Lobo
2000-12-31 19:43:49 UTC
Permalink
Edgar,
The helmets problem is a problem for Goa.
You are talking of countries where two wheelers are used by a selected few
for reasons other than pure transportation.
We have Mumbai, a city of approx 15 million people. What do you think is
the statistics of this city with respect to the registered two wheelers?
Very low perhaps. Why? Because Mumbai has a very effective mode of public
transport, the public transport that never sleeps. And if it did, Mumbai
would a hell to be in. People do not need to have their own transport. You
get out from your flat or whatever, you hail a cab if your pocket suits you.
Otherwise you hail a rick or take the bus to the station. Then you ride
miles and miles to your destination to and fro in minutes which would
otherwise take you hours on end. (even by bus). Therefore, for pure
economics and convenience, the population of two wheelers is down in Mumbai.
And in Mumbai the Government can make it mandatory for two wheeler riders to
wear helmets. I really do not know if this is so, for I have never seen any
great bulk of two wheelers there like in Goa.

Now take the case of Goa. Two wheeler is a family transport mode. The public
transport is in shambles. Given the terrain of Goa, two wheelers family
transportation is a must for low middle income families. In far away/remote
areas, the only practical mode of transport is a two wheeler. Your son or
your daughter , otherwise, will never reach college or even in some cases
to school in time. Every child wants a scooty to go to college or to
school. And in the absence of a well catered-for public transport, this
demand is increasing steadily. That is why you see more and more two wheeler
showrooms coming up in Goa. With the rip-off prices that these two
wheelers command, do they give away a helmet with the two wheeler? NOPE. You
have to buy one. That too is 99.999 % absolutely substandard and will crack
if it merely falls down. Plus we have two wheeler taxis too. If the
government makes helmets mandatory, that will mean a family of 4 (2 + 2
tots) will have to invest in 4 helmets. Do they make helmets for minors?
That means the government will have to ban carriage of children on two
wheelers if they make helmets mandatory. And where do you park the four
helmets when you park the two wheeler? You can say goodbye to the helmets if
you even lock them on the bike. So you tote you 2 tots as well as tote 4
helmets. And how do you make children to use the helmets? And does a
government department or a private company allocate place to store your
helmets? In all probability, they would have to have an extra room with an
extra guard. Is it viable?

My brother died fro a cracked skull in spite of wearing an expensive chin
guard helmet and with a mania for wearing helmet as big as life itself. It
was manufactured in INDIA. The best export quality helmets from India tested
by an international firm (SWISS) have failed miserably, even along with some
US models.

The government is in no position to enforce the mandatory helmets rule in
Goa. Let us face the facts. The government will first have to streamline the
manufacture of helmets that can withstand stringent tests. Otherwise the
Government of Goa will have to put in place a very effective urban as well
as rural public transportation system that will be up from 5 AM to 12 PM.
Or
The government should come out with a legislation that no ex-gratia payment
will be made to any two wheeler accident victim if found not wearing helmet
at the time of accident, whether it was a head injury or not.

Therefore, under the circumstances, you decide if any government in Goa can
afford to make helmets mandatory with prevailing conditions.

As for Goasuraj, we have decided that we will put a state of the art public
transport system at the hand of its people where not only two wheelers will
be a burden for the households, even 4 wheelers will be reduced in time to
come.

It could well be a very "wishful thinking" bordering on bluff, but then
that is all we have to our account. We believe that if we start with a sound
and persistent idea, it will bear fruit in time to come.

Cheers
Floriano
<<
Re; Wearing a Helmet
The responsibility of wearing a helmet when driving a two-wheeler is
that of the driver and his/her family (parents, spouse, children and
other first degree relatives) who permit him or her to do so! Crying at
the funeral and blaming the government and others for this fatal (and
preventable) accident is fruitless and non-productive. At this point we
can only learn for the accident. Regards, GL
This is the most ignorant posting I have read for a long time. He who
has composed this is bereft of logic. He never asks what the government is
there for. I live in a country that legislates for the good of its
citizens.
Let me tell this knucklehead a law in what a Goan erroneously considers a
backward country.
That country is Trinidad which though tiny, has produced a Nobel
Prize winner for literature, a world class sprinter and a batsman on par
with
Sachin Tendulkar.
After 7 p.m. a cyclist must have a light. I mean a cyclist and not a
motorcyclist. If a rider has a puncture and has no lights, he must lift
the
bike on his head and not move it with the wheels on the road.
I have said that Goans have a proclivity for thieving. They also
like
to argue. Where on earth has one seen the antics of two wheel riders. They
ride side by side on Goan roads while chatting. Most accidents on Goa's
roads
are due to the carelessness of the drivers. Goans must learn to obey
orders
and the law in particular. As Dr. Colaco has written, they have hard heads
and Mr. Lawrence, you are no exception. I have no patience for nonsence
and I
will say so. Cecil and Aiyres share this distinction with you.
Edgar Martins
Floriano Lobo
2000-12-31 20:14:10 UTC
Permalink
If you wait for the Government to provide an infrastructure and tip top bus
service, there will
be no passengers to ride the busses (when Goa Suraj comes to power) as
people
in graves do not need to move.
That would, indeed, be an ideal situation to take over the reins of Goa
from the BJP, the Congress, the MGP and the UGDP. IF THAT HAPPENED.

In that case, there would be no opposition to the "wear Helmet" rule. For
that matter Goa Su-Raj Government can go ahead and do whatever it liked and
there would be no opposition at all. It could ban the two wheeler pilots in
the first place. It could make "work helmets" mandatory for all industrial
units. It could even bring in the "wear helmet" rule for the cyclists. It
could clear all roads of illegal and legal encroachments including religious
places of worship and make roads safer for beautiful empty buses to drive.
It could even bannish the PWD and the Telecom Department from the soil of
Goa for being the biggest culprits in populating the graveyards. It could
send all the strays from the roads packing to the houses and bungalows of
the friends of the strays who help the PWD and the Telecom Department . It
could even send all the Goan bus drivers on a deputation to BEST of Mumbai
and bring in the BEST bus drivers to take over the buses in Goa. We could
sack the Transport Minister and all the RTOs over and over again until they
wisen up to the road etc. safety. And we could make the auto industry (two
wheeler manufacturers) to give away two adult helmets and one child helmet
free with the sale of each two wheeler. And we could order some brand new
backbones from Italy, Germany, Japan, USA what have you and give them free
of cost to our politicians and bureaucrats so they could take firm steps to
implement all the marvelous rules, regulations and laws that Goa Su-Raj will
bring in to make Goa that extra little peaceful for all those beautiful
people in the graveyards who will neve rise up on the election day to cast
their votes against it, to send it back to the limbo again.

Dear Edgar,
What we require is the will of STEEL in our politicians to come out with
rules and the backbones to implement them without the bother of counting
votes. I am still to see a defiant violator of the rules if the whip is a
coming to crack on the bare back. And this is what, not only Goa requires,
but INDIA requires badly. Unfortunately, Sir Winston Churchill was right
when he had predicted backbones full of straw in our Indian Politicians way
back in 1947. And I am proud to have been born in that year of accurate
prediction.

And, I am really very happy today that Sanjit Rodrigues has qualified to
take over as the Commissioner of the Panjim Municipal Corporation. If we see
some of the much missing 'steel' in the bureaucratic backbones, it is in
Sanjit's.

Cheers
Floriano

******
I fully agree and endorse GL's views.
A simple solution to a complex helmets problem.
Floriano.
Re; Wearing a Helmet
The responsibility of wearing a helmet when driving a two-wheeler is
that of the driver and his/her family (parents, spouse, children and
other first degree relatives) who permit him or her to do so! Crying at
the funeral and blaming the government and others for this fatal (and
preventable) accident is fruitless and non-productive. At this point we
can only learn for the accident. Regards, GL
#####################################################################
Floriano, I see a fluctuation in your views. You do not contradict
me
but put new obstacles in the path of progress. Let me explain.
You put the onus above on the family to see that a two whell rider
wears a helmet. Then you go into a polemical discussion on the
shortcomings
of the government who do not provide adequate busses and tell us that if
and
when Goans have a Goa Suraj government the people of Goa will not need two
wheelers. Furthermore, you criticize the standard and quality of helmets
sold
in Goa. Here is something for you to reflect on. I have lived in Goa when
busses ran eratically and they were not comfortable. I walked and did not
complain for this would not alleviate my situation. Today, the situation
is
much improved, believe me. Stop complaining. The Government (RTA) must
swindle money and hence, we lack the resourses to obviate this helmet
problem.
I own a scooter and I took a helmet with me to Goa. Many who have
died due to head injuries did not wear a helmet, not because the quality
of
the helmets sold in Goa was poor but because they felt comfortable without
one. Austin Soares often travelled abroad and his wife is an Aussie. I
have
just had an e-mail from a lady who rides a bike daily and writes to say
that
due to the heat her head itched and she has discontinued the habit. But
now
she swears that she will wear one.
I have never maintained that everyone wearing a helmet will be
saved
from death. Other factors are involved like the impact of the collission
and
the speed of the moving object. It is like sitting in a bus without a
guarantee that you will be saved if you sat at the back, front or the side
of
the bus. Same goes with planes.
1. Is wearing a helmet safer than not wearing one?
2. Should the taxpayer be responsible to defray the cost of the
ambulance and treatment?
3. Is there no trauma and stress borne by the family? Do you feel
that
the children should cope without a bread winner?
I am grieved that your brother who wore a helmet died. I maintain
that
even a paper mache helmet is better than no helmet. If you wait for the
Government to provide an infrastructure and tip top bus service, there
will
be no passengers to ride the busses (when Goa Suraj comes to power) as
people
in graves do not need to move.
Above all, we as Goans must learn discipline and not rebel (and argue)
at
every opportunity. There are virtues in obeying parents and government
laws
even if they are wrong. There is much to say of a kid who disobeys his
parents even if what he is asked to perform is wrong. From obeying we
learn
discipline and from discipline we learn to reason.
Edgar Martins
Floriano Lobo
2000-12-31 19:43:49 UTC
Permalink
Edgar,
The helmets problem is a problem for Goa.
You are talking of countries where two wheelers are used by a selected few
for reasons other than pure transportation.
We have Mumbai, a city of approx 15 million people. What do you think is
the statistics of this city with respect to the registered two wheelers?
Very low perhaps. Why? Because Mumbai has a very effective mode of public
transport, the public transport that never sleeps. And if it did, Mumbai
would a hell to be in. People do not need to have their own transport. You
get out from your flat or whatever, you hail a cab if your pocket suits you.
Otherwise you hail a rick or take the bus to the station. Then you ride
miles and miles to your destination to and fro in minutes which would
otherwise take you hours on end. (even by bus). Therefore, for pure
economics and convenience, the population of two wheelers is down in Mumbai.
And in Mumbai the Government can make it mandatory for two wheeler riders to
wear helmets. I really do not know if this is so, for I have never seen any
great bulk of two wheelers there like in Goa.

Now take the case of Goa. Two wheeler is a family transport mode. The public
transport is in shambles. Given the terrain of Goa, two wheelers family
transportation is a must for low middle income families. In far away/remote
areas, the only practical mode of transport is a two wheeler. Your son or
your daughter , otherwise, will never reach college or even in some cases
to school in time. Every child wants a scooty to go to college or to
school. And in the absence of a well catered-for public transport, this
demand is increasing steadily. That is why you see more and more two wheeler
showrooms coming up in Goa. With the rip-off prices that these two
wheelers command, do they give away a helmet with the two wheeler? NOPE. You
have to buy one. That too is 99.999 % absolutely substandard and will crack
if it merely falls down. Plus we have two wheeler taxis too. If the
government makes helmets mandatory, that will mean a family of 4 (2 + 2
tots) will have to invest in 4 helmets. Do they make helmets for minors?
That means the government will have to ban carriage of children on two
wheelers if they make helmets mandatory. And where do you park the four
helmets when you park the two wheeler? You can say goodbye to the helmets if
you even lock them on the bike. So you tote you 2 tots as well as tote 4
helmets. And how do you make children to use the helmets? And does a
government department or a private company allocate place to store your
helmets? In all probability, they would have to have an extra room with an
extra guard. Is it viable?

My brother died fro a cracked skull in spite of wearing an expensive chin
guard helmet and with a mania for wearing helmet as big as life itself. It
was manufactured in INDIA. The best export quality helmets from India tested
by an international firm (SWISS) have failed miserably, even along with some
US models.

The government is in no position to enforce the mandatory helmets rule in
Goa. Let us face the facts. The government will first have to streamline the
manufacture of helmets that can withstand stringent tests. Otherwise the
Government of Goa will have to put in place a very effective urban as well
as rural public transportation system that will be up from 5 AM to 12 PM.
Or
The government should come out with a legislation that no ex-gratia payment
will be made to any two wheeler accident victim if found not wearing helmet
at the time of accident, whether it was a head injury or not.

Therefore, under the circumstances, you decide if any government in Goa can
afford to make helmets mandatory with prevailing conditions.

As for Goasuraj, we have decided that we will put a state of the art public
transport system at the hand of its people where not only two wheelers will
be a burden for the households, even 4 wheelers will be reduced in time to
come.

It could well be a very "wishful thinking" bordering on bluff, but then
that is all we have to our account. We believe that if we start with a sound
and persistent idea, it will bear fruit in time to come.

Cheers
Floriano
<<
Re; Wearing a Helmet
The responsibility of wearing a helmet when driving a two-wheeler is
that of the driver and his/her family (parents, spouse, children and
other first degree relatives) who permit him or her to do so! Crying at
the funeral and blaming the government and others for this fatal (and
preventable) accident is fruitless and non-productive. At this point we
can only learn for the accident. Regards, GL
This is the most ignorant posting I have read for a long time. He who
has composed this is bereft of logic. He never asks what the government is
there for. I live in a country that legislates for the good of its
citizens.
Let me tell this knucklehead a law in what a Goan erroneously considers a
backward country.
That country is Trinidad which though tiny, has produced a Nobel
Prize winner for literature, a world class sprinter and a batsman on par
with
Sachin Tendulkar.
After 7 p.m. a cyclist must have a light. I mean a cyclist and not a
motorcyclist. If a rider has a puncture and has no lights, he must lift
the
bike on his head and not move it with the wheels on the road.
I have said that Goans have a proclivity for thieving. They also
like
to argue. Where on earth has one seen the antics of two wheel riders. They
ride side by side on Goan roads while chatting. Most accidents on Goa's
roads
are due to the carelessness of the drivers. Goans must learn to obey
orders
and the law in particular. As Dr. Colaco has written, they have hard heads
and Mr. Lawrence, you are no exception. I have no patience for nonsence
and I
will say so. Cecil and Aiyres share this distinction with you.
Edgar Martins
Floriano Lobo
2000-12-31 20:14:10 UTC
Permalink
If you wait for the Government to provide an infrastructure and tip top bus
service, there will
be no passengers to ride the busses (when Goa Suraj comes to power) as
people
in graves do not need to move.
That would, indeed, be an ideal situation to take over the reins of Goa
from the BJP, the Congress, the MGP and the UGDP. IF THAT HAPPENED.

In that case, there would be no opposition to the "wear Helmet" rule. For
that matter Goa Su-Raj Government can go ahead and do whatever it liked and
there would be no opposition at all. It could ban the two wheeler pilots in
the first place. It could make "work helmets" mandatory for all industrial
units. It could even bring in the "wear helmet" rule for the cyclists. It
could clear all roads of illegal and legal encroachments including religious
places of worship and make roads safer for beautiful empty buses to drive.
It could even bannish the PWD and the Telecom Department from the soil of
Goa for being the biggest culprits in populating the graveyards. It could
send all the strays from the roads packing to the houses and bungalows of
the friends of the strays who help the PWD and the Telecom Department . It
could even send all the Goan bus drivers on a deputation to BEST of Mumbai
and bring in the BEST bus drivers to take over the buses in Goa. We could
sack the Transport Minister and all the RTOs over and over again until they
wisen up to the road etc. safety. And we could make the auto industry (two
wheeler manufacturers) to give away two adult helmets and one child helmet
free with the sale of each two wheeler. And we could order some brand new
backbones from Italy, Germany, Japan, USA what have you and give them free
of cost to our politicians and bureaucrats so they could take firm steps to
implement all the marvelous rules, regulations and laws that Goa Su-Raj will
bring in to make Goa that extra little peaceful for all those beautiful
people in the graveyards who will neve rise up on the election day to cast
their votes against it, to send it back to the limbo again.

Dear Edgar,
What we require is the will of STEEL in our politicians to come out with
rules and the backbones to implement them without the bother of counting
votes. I am still to see a defiant violator of the rules if the whip is a
coming to crack on the bare back. And this is what, not only Goa requires,
but INDIA requires badly. Unfortunately, Sir Winston Churchill was right
when he had predicted backbones full of straw in our Indian Politicians way
back in 1947. And I am proud to have been born in that year of accurate
prediction.

And, I am really very happy today that Sanjit Rodrigues has qualified to
take over as the Commissioner of the Panjim Municipal Corporation. If we see
some of the much missing 'steel' in the bureaucratic backbones, it is in
Sanjit's.

Cheers
Floriano

******
I fully agree and endorse GL's views.
A simple solution to a complex helmets problem.
Floriano.
Re; Wearing a Helmet
The responsibility of wearing a helmet when driving a two-wheeler is
that of the driver and his/her family (parents, spouse, children and
other first degree relatives) who permit him or her to do so! Crying at
the funeral and blaming the government and others for this fatal (and
preventable) accident is fruitless and non-productive. At this point we
can only learn for the accident. Regards, GL
#####################################################################
Floriano, I see a fluctuation in your views. You do not contradict
me
but put new obstacles in the path of progress. Let me explain.
You put the onus above on the family to see that a two whell rider
wears a helmet. Then you go into a polemical discussion on the
shortcomings
of the government who do not provide adequate busses and tell us that if
and
when Goans have a Goa Suraj government the people of Goa will not need two
wheelers. Furthermore, you criticize the standard and quality of helmets
sold
in Goa. Here is something for you to reflect on. I have lived in Goa when
busses ran eratically and they were not comfortable. I walked and did not
complain for this would not alleviate my situation. Today, the situation
is
much improved, believe me. Stop complaining. The Government (RTA) must
swindle money and hence, we lack the resourses to obviate this helmet
problem.
I own a scooter and I took a helmet with me to Goa. Many who have
died due to head injuries did not wear a helmet, not because the quality
of
the helmets sold in Goa was poor but because they felt comfortable without
one. Austin Soares often travelled abroad and his wife is an Aussie. I
have
just had an e-mail from a lady who rides a bike daily and writes to say
that
due to the heat her head itched and she has discontinued the habit. But
now
she swears that she will wear one.
I have never maintained that everyone wearing a helmet will be
saved
from death. Other factors are involved like the impact of the collission
and
the speed of the moving object. It is like sitting in a bus without a
guarantee that you will be saved if you sat at the back, front or the side
of
the bus. Same goes with planes.
1. Is wearing a helmet safer than not wearing one?
2. Should the taxpayer be responsible to defray the cost of the
ambulance and treatment?
3. Is there no trauma and stress borne by the family? Do you feel
that
the children should cope without a bread winner?
I am grieved that your brother who wore a helmet died. I maintain
that
even a paper mache helmet is better than no helmet. If you wait for the
Government to provide an infrastructure and tip top bus service, there
will
be no passengers to ride the busses (when Goa Suraj comes to power) as
people
in graves do not need to move.
Above all, we as Goans must learn discipline and not rebel (and argue)
at
every opportunity. There are virtues in obeying parents and government
laws
even if they are wrong. There is much to say of a kid who disobeys his
parents even if what he is asked to perform is wrong. From obeying we
learn
discipline and from discipline we learn to reason.
Edgar Martins
Floriano Lobo
2000-12-31 19:43:49 UTC
Permalink
Edgar,
The helmets problem is a problem for Goa.
You are talking of countries where two wheelers are used by a selected few
for reasons other than pure transportation.
We have Mumbai, a city of approx 15 million people. What do you think is
the statistics of this city with respect to the registered two wheelers?
Very low perhaps. Why? Because Mumbai has a very effective mode of public
transport, the public transport that never sleeps. And if it did, Mumbai
would a hell to be in. People do not need to have their own transport. You
get out from your flat or whatever, you hail a cab if your pocket suits you.
Otherwise you hail a rick or take the bus to the station. Then you ride
miles and miles to your destination to and fro in minutes which would
otherwise take you hours on end. (even by bus). Therefore, for pure
economics and convenience, the population of two wheelers is down in Mumbai.
And in Mumbai the Government can make it mandatory for two wheeler riders to
wear helmets. I really do not know if this is so, for I have never seen any
great bulk of two wheelers there like in Goa.

Now take the case of Goa. Two wheeler is a family transport mode. The public
transport is in shambles. Given the terrain of Goa, two wheelers family
transportation is a must for low middle income families. In far away/remote
areas, the only practical mode of transport is a two wheeler. Your son or
your daughter , otherwise, will never reach college or even in some cases
to school in time. Every child wants a scooty to go to college or to
school. And in the absence of a well catered-for public transport, this
demand is increasing steadily. That is why you see more and more two wheeler
showrooms coming up in Goa. With the rip-off prices that these two
wheelers command, do they give away a helmet with the two wheeler? NOPE. You
have to buy one. That too is 99.999 % absolutely substandard and will crack
if it merely falls down. Plus we have two wheeler taxis too. If the
government makes helmets mandatory, that will mean a family of 4 (2 + 2
tots) will have to invest in 4 helmets. Do they make helmets for minors?
That means the government will have to ban carriage of children on two
wheelers if they make helmets mandatory. And where do you park the four
helmets when you park the two wheeler? You can say goodbye to the helmets if
you even lock them on the bike. So you tote you 2 tots as well as tote 4
helmets. And how do you make children to use the helmets? And does a
government department or a private company allocate place to store your
helmets? In all probability, they would have to have an extra room with an
extra guard. Is it viable?

My brother died fro a cracked skull in spite of wearing an expensive chin
guard helmet and with a mania for wearing helmet as big as life itself. It
was manufactured in INDIA. The best export quality helmets from India tested
by an international firm (SWISS) have failed miserably, even along with some
US models.

The government is in no position to enforce the mandatory helmets rule in
Goa. Let us face the facts. The government will first have to streamline the
manufacture of helmets that can withstand stringent tests. Otherwise the
Government of Goa will have to put in place a very effective urban as well
as rural public transportation system that will be up from 5 AM to 12 PM.
Or
The government should come out with a legislation that no ex-gratia payment
will be made to any two wheeler accident victim if found not wearing helmet
at the time of accident, whether it was a head injury or not.

Therefore, under the circumstances, you decide if any government in Goa can
afford to make helmets mandatory with prevailing conditions.

As for Goasuraj, we have decided that we will put a state of the art public
transport system at the hand of its people where not only two wheelers will
be a burden for the households, even 4 wheelers will be reduced in time to
come.

It could well be a very "wishful thinking" bordering on bluff, but then
that is all we have to our account. We believe that if we start with a sound
and persistent idea, it will bear fruit in time to come.

Cheers
Floriano
<<
Re; Wearing a Helmet
The responsibility of wearing a helmet when driving a two-wheeler is
that of the driver and his/her family (parents, spouse, children and
other first degree relatives) who permit him or her to do so! Crying at
the funeral and blaming the government and others for this fatal (and
preventable) accident is fruitless and non-productive. At this point we
can only learn for the accident. Regards, GL
This is the most ignorant posting I have read for a long time. He who
has composed this is bereft of logic. He never asks what the government is
there for. I live in a country that legislates for the good of its
citizens.
Let me tell this knucklehead a law in what a Goan erroneously considers a
backward country.
That country is Trinidad which though tiny, has produced a Nobel
Prize winner for literature, a world class sprinter and a batsman on par
with
Sachin Tendulkar.
After 7 p.m. a cyclist must have a light. I mean a cyclist and not a
motorcyclist. If a rider has a puncture and has no lights, he must lift
the
bike on his head and not move it with the wheels on the road.
I have said that Goans have a proclivity for thieving. They also
like
to argue. Where on earth has one seen the antics of two wheel riders. They
ride side by side on Goan roads while chatting. Most accidents on Goa's
roads
are due to the carelessness of the drivers. Goans must learn to obey
orders
and the law in particular. As Dr. Colaco has written, they have hard heads
and Mr. Lawrence, you are no exception. I have no patience for nonsence
and I
will say so. Cecil and Aiyres share this distinction with you.
Edgar Martins
Floriano Lobo
2000-12-31 20:14:10 UTC
Permalink
If you wait for the Government to provide an infrastructure and tip top bus
service, there will
be no passengers to ride the busses (when Goa Suraj comes to power) as
people
in graves do not need to move.
That would, indeed, be an ideal situation to take over the reins of Goa
from the BJP, the Congress, the MGP and the UGDP. IF THAT HAPPENED.

In that case, there would be no opposition to the "wear Helmet" rule. For
that matter Goa Su-Raj Government can go ahead and do whatever it liked and
there would be no opposition at all. It could ban the two wheeler pilots in
the first place. It could make "work helmets" mandatory for all industrial
units. It could even bring in the "wear helmet" rule for the cyclists. It
could clear all roads of illegal and legal encroachments including religious
places of worship and make roads safer for beautiful empty buses to drive.
It could even bannish the PWD and the Telecom Department from the soil of
Goa for being the biggest culprits in populating the graveyards. It could
send all the strays from the roads packing to the houses and bungalows of
the friends of the strays who help the PWD and the Telecom Department . It
could even send all the Goan bus drivers on a deputation to BEST of Mumbai
and bring in the BEST bus drivers to take over the buses in Goa. We could
sack the Transport Minister and all the RTOs over and over again until they
wisen up to the road etc. safety. And we could make the auto industry (two
wheeler manufacturers) to give away two adult helmets and one child helmet
free with the sale of each two wheeler. And we could order some brand new
backbones from Italy, Germany, Japan, USA what have you and give them free
of cost to our politicians and bureaucrats so they could take firm steps to
implement all the marvelous rules, regulations and laws that Goa Su-Raj will
bring in to make Goa that extra little peaceful for all those beautiful
people in the graveyards who will neve rise up on the election day to cast
their votes against it, to send it back to the limbo again.

Dear Edgar,
What we require is the will of STEEL in our politicians to come out with
rules and the backbones to implement them without the bother of counting
votes. I am still to see a defiant violator of the rules if the whip is a
coming to crack on the bare back. And this is what, not only Goa requires,
but INDIA requires badly. Unfortunately, Sir Winston Churchill was right
when he had predicted backbones full of straw in our Indian Politicians way
back in 1947. And I am proud to have been born in that year of accurate
prediction.

And, I am really very happy today that Sanjit Rodrigues has qualified to
take over as the Commissioner of the Panjim Municipal Corporation. If we see
some of the much missing 'steel' in the bureaucratic backbones, it is in
Sanjit's.

Cheers
Floriano

******
I fully agree and endorse GL's views.
A simple solution to a complex helmets problem.
Floriano.
Re; Wearing a Helmet
The responsibility of wearing a helmet when driving a two-wheeler is
that of the driver and his/her family (parents, spouse, children and
other first degree relatives) who permit him or her to do so! Crying at
the funeral and blaming the government and others for this fatal (and
preventable) accident is fruitless and non-productive. At this point we
can only learn for the accident. Regards, GL
#####################################################################
Floriano, I see a fluctuation in your views. You do not contradict
me
but put new obstacles in the path of progress. Let me explain.
You put the onus above on the family to see that a two whell rider
wears a helmet. Then you go into a polemical discussion on the
shortcomings
of the government who do not provide adequate busses and tell us that if
and
when Goans have a Goa Suraj government the people of Goa will not need two
wheelers. Furthermore, you criticize the standard and quality of helmets
sold
in Goa. Here is something for you to reflect on. I have lived in Goa when
busses ran eratically and they were not comfortable. I walked and did not
complain for this would not alleviate my situation. Today, the situation
is
much improved, believe me. Stop complaining. The Government (RTA) must
swindle money and hence, we lack the resourses to obviate this helmet
problem.
I own a scooter and I took a helmet with me to Goa. Many who have
died due to head injuries did not wear a helmet, not because the quality
of
the helmets sold in Goa was poor but because they felt comfortable without
one. Austin Soares often travelled abroad and his wife is an Aussie. I
have
just had an e-mail from a lady who rides a bike daily and writes to say
that
due to the heat her head itched and she has discontinued the habit. But
now
she swears that she will wear one.
I have never maintained that everyone wearing a helmet will be
saved
from death. Other factors are involved like the impact of the collission
and
the speed of the moving object. It is like sitting in a bus without a
guarantee that you will be saved if you sat at the back, front or the side
of
the bus. Same goes with planes.
1. Is wearing a helmet safer than not wearing one?
2. Should the taxpayer be responsible to defray the cost of the
ambulance and treatment?
3. Is there no trauma and stress borne by the family? Do you feel
that
the children should cope without a bread winner?
I am grieved that your brother who wore a helmet died. I maintain
that
even a paper mache helmet is better than no helmet. If you wait for the
Government to provide an infrastructure and tip top bus service, there
will
be no passengers to ride the busses (when Goa Suraj comes to power) as
people
in graves do not need to move.
Above all, we as Goans must learn discipline and not rebel (and argue)
at
every opportunity. There are virtues in obeying parents and government
laws
even if they are wrong. There is much to say of a kid who disobeys his
parents even if what he is asked to perform is wrong. From obeying we
learn
discipline and from discipline we learn to reason.
Edgar Martins
Floriano Lobo
2000-12-31 19:43:49 UTC
Permalink
Edgar,
The helmets problem is a problem for Goa.
You are talking of countries where two wheelers are used by a selected few
for reasons other than pure transportation.
We have Mumbai, a city of approx 15 million people. What do you think is
the statistics of this city with respect to the registered two wheelers?
Very low perhaps. Why? Because Mumbai has a very effective mode of public
transport, the public transport that never sleeps. And if it did, Mumbai
would a hell to be in. People do not need to have their own transport. You
get out from your flat or whatever, you hail a cab if your pocket suits you.
Otherwise you hail a rick or take the bus to the station. Then you ride
miles and miles to your destination to and fro in minutes which would
otherwise take you hours on end. (even by bus). Therefore, for pure
economics and convenience, the population of two wheelers is down in Mumbai.
And in Mumbai the Government can make it mandatory for two wheeler riders to
wear helmets. I really do not know if this is so, for I have never seen any
great bulk of two wheelers there like in Goa.

Now take the case of Goa. Two wheeler is a family transport mode. The public
transport is in shambles. Given the terrain of Goa, two wheelers family
transportation is a must for low middle income families. In far away/remote
areas, the only practical mode of transport is a two wheeler. Your son or
your daughter , otherwise, will never reach college or even in some cases
to school in time. Every child wants a scooty to go to college or to
school. And in the absence of a well catered-for public transport, this
demand is increasing steadily. That is why you see more and more two wheeler
showrooms coming up in Goa. With the rip-off prices that these two
wheelers command, do they give away a helmet with the two wheeler? NOPE. You
have to buy one. That too is 99.999 % absolutely substandard and will crack
if it merely falls down. Plus we have two wheeler taxis too. If the
government makes helmets mandatory, that will mean a family of 4 (2 + 2
tots) will have to invest in 4 helmets. Do they make helmets for minors?
That means the government will have to ban carriage of children on two
wheelers if they make helmets mandatory. And where do you park the four
helmets when you park the two wheeler? You can say goodbye to the helmets if
you even lock them on the bike. So you tote you 2 tots as well as tote 4
helmets. And how do you make children to use the helmets? And does a
government department or a private company allocate place to store your
helmets? In all probability, they would have to have an extra room with an
extra guard. Is it viable?

My brother died fro a cracked skull in spite of wearing an expensive chin
guard helmet and with a mania for wearing helmet as big as life itself. It
was manufactured in INDIA. The best export quality helmets from India tested
by an international firm (SWISS) have failed miserably, even along with some
US models.

The government is in no position to enforce the mandatory helmets rule in
Goa. Let us face the facts. The government will first have to streamline the
manufacture of helmets that can withstand stringent tests. Otherwise the
Government of Goa will have to put in place a very effective urban as well
as rural public transportation system that will be up from 5 AM to 12 PM.
Or
The government should come out with a legislation that no ex-gratia payment
will be made to any two wheeler accident victim if found not wearing helmet
at the time of accident, whether it was a head injury or not.

Therefore, under the circumstances, you decide if any government in Goa can
afford to make helmets mandatory with prevailing conditions.

As for Goasuraj, we have decided that we will put a state of the art public
transport system at the hand of its people where not only two wheelers will
be a burden for the households, even 4 wheelers will be reduced in time to
come.

It could well be a very "wishful thinking" bordering on bluff, but then
that is all we have to our account. We believe that if we start with a sound
and persistent idea, it will bear fruit in time to come.

Cheers
Floriano
<<
Re; Wearing a Helmet
The responsibility of wearing a helmet when driving a two-wheeler is
that of the driver and his/her family (parents, spouse, children and
other first degree relatives) who permit him or her to do so! Crying at
the funeral and blaming the government and others for this fatal (and
preventable) accident is fruitless and non-productive. At this point we
can only learn for the accident. Regards, GL
This is the most ignorant posting I have read for a long time. He who
has composed this is bereft of logic. He never asks what the government is
there for. I live in a country that legislates for the good of its
citizens.
Let me tell this knucklehead a law in what a Goan erroneously considers a
backward country.
That country is Trinidad which though tiny, has produced a Nobel
Prize winner for literature, a world class sprinter and a batsman on par
with
Sachin Tendulkar.
After 7 p.m. a cyclist must have a light. I mean a cyclist and not a
motorcyclist. If a rider has a puncture and has no lights, he must lift
the
bike on his head and not move it with the wheels on the road.
I have said that Goans have a proclivity for thieving. They also
like
to argue. Where on earth has one seen the antics of two wheel riders. They
ride side by side on Goan roads while chatting. Most accidents on Goa's
roads
are due to the carelessness of the drivers. Goans must learn to obey
orders
and the law in particular. As Dr. Colaco has written, they have hard heads
and Mr. Lawrence, you are no exception. I have no patience for nonsence
and I
will say so. Cecil and Aiyres share this distinction with you.
Edgar Martins
Floriano Lobo
2000-12-31 20:14:10 UTC
Permalink
If you wait for the Government to provide an infrastructure and tip top bus
service, there will
be no passengers to ride the busses (when Goa Suraj comes to power) as
people
in graves do not need to move.
That would, indeed, be an ideal situation to take over the reins of Goa
from the BJP, the Congress, the MGP and the UGDP. IF THAT HAPPENED.

In that case, there would be no opposition to the "wear Helmet" rule. For
that matter Goa Su-Raj Government can go ahead and do whatever it liked and
there would be no opposition at all. It could ban the two wheeler pilots in
the first place. It could make "work helmets" mandatory for all industrial
units. It could even bring in the "wear helmet" rule for the cyclists. It
could clear all roads of illegal and legal encroachments including religious
places of worship and make roads safer for beautiful empty buses to drive.
It could even bannish the PWD and the Telecom Department from the soil of
Goa for being the biggest culprits in populating the graveyards. It could
send all the strays from the roads packing to the houses and bungalows of
the friends of the strays who help the PWD and the Telecom Department . It
could even send all the Goan bus drivers on a deputation to BEST of Mumbai
and bring in the BEST bus drivers to take over the buses in Goa. We could
sack the Transport Minister and all the RTOs over and over again until they
wisen up to the road etc. safety. And we could make the auto industry (two
wheeler manufacturers) to give away two adult helmets and one child helmet
free with the sale of each two wheeler. And we could order some brand new
backbones from Italy, Germany, Japan, USA what have you and give them free
of cost to our politicians and bureaucrats so they could take firm steps to
implement all the marvelous rules, regulations and laws that Goa Su-Raj will
bring in to make Goa that extra little peaceful for all those beautiful
people in the graveyards who will neve rise up on the election day to cast
their votes against it, to send it back to the limbo again.

Dear Edgar,
What we require is the will of STEEL in our politicians to come out with
rules and the backbones to implement them without the bother of counting
votes. I am still to see a defiant violator of the rules if the whip is a
coming to crack on the bare back. And this is what, not only Goa requires,
but INDIA requires badly. Unfortunately, Sir Winston Churchill was right
when he had predicted backbones full of straw in our Indian Politicians way
back in 1947. And I am proud to have been born in that year of accurate
prediction.

And, I am really very happy today that Sanjit Rodrigues has qualified to
take over as the Commissioner of the Panjim Municipal Corporation. If we see
some of the much missing 'steel' in the bureaucratic backbones, it is in
Sanjit's.

Cheers
Floriano

******
I fully agree and endorse GL's views.
A simple solution to a complex helmets problem.
Floriano.
Re; Wearing a Helmet
The responsibility of wearing a helmet when driving a two-wheeler is
that of the driver and his/her family (parents, spouse, children and
other first degree relatives) who permit him or her to do so! Crying at
the funeral and blaming the government and others for this fatal (and
preventable) accident is fruitless and non-productive. At this point we
can only learn for the accident. Regards, GL
#####################################################################
Floriano, I see a fluctuation in your views. You do not contradict
me
but put new obstacles in the path of progress. Let me explain.
You put the onus above on the family to see that a two whell rider
wears a helmet. Then you go into a polemical discussion on the
shortcomings
of the government who do not provide adequate busses and tell us that if
and
when Goans have a Goa Suraj government the people of Goa will not need two
wheelers. Furthermore, you criticize the standard and quality of helmets
sold
in Goa. Here is something for you to reflect on. I have lived in Goa when
busses ran eratically and they were not comfortable. I walked and did not
complain for this would not alleviate my situation. Today, the situation
is
much improved, believe me. Stop complaining. The Government (RTA) must
swindle money and hence, we lack the resourses to obviate this helmet
problem.
I own a scooter and I took a helmet with me to Goa. Many who have
died due to head injuries did not wear a helmet, not because the quality
of
the helmets sold in Goa was poor but because they felt comfortable without
one. Austin Soares often travelled abroad and his wife is an Aussie. I
have
just had an e-mail from a lady who rides a bike daily and writes to say
that
due to the heat her head itched and she has discontinued the habit. But
now
she swears that she will wear one.
I have never maintained that everyone wearing a helmet will be
saved
from death. Other factors are involved like the impact of the collission
and
the speed of the moving object. It is like sitting in a bus without a
guarantee that you will be saved if you sat at the back, front or the side
of
the bus. Same goes with planes.
1. Is wearing a helmet safer than not wearing one?
2. Should the taxpayer be responsible to defray the cost of the
ambulance and treatment?
3. Is there no trauma and stress borne by the family? Do you feel
that
the children should cope without a bread winner?
I am grieved that your brother who wore a helmet died. I maintain
that
even a paper mache helmet is better than no helmet. If you wait for the
Government to provide an infrastructure and tip top bus service, there
will
be no passengers to ride the busses (when Goa Suraj comes to power) as
people
in graves do not need to move.
Above all, we as Goans must learn discipline and not rebel (and argue)
at
every opportunity. There are virtues in obeying parents and government
laws
even if they are wrong. There is much to say of a kid who disobeys his
parents even if what he is asked to perform is wrong. From obeying we
learn
discipline and from discipline we learn to reason.
Edgar Martins
Floriano Lobo
2000-12-31 19:43:49 UTC
Permalink
Edgar,
The helmets problem is a problem for Goa.
You are talking of countries where two wheelers are used by a selected few
for reasons other than pure transportation.
We have Mumbai, a city of approx 15 million people. What do you think is
the statistics of this city with respect to the registered two wheelers?
Very low perhaps. Why? Because Mumbai has a very effective mode of public
transport, the public transport that never sleeps. And if it did, Mumbai
would a hell to be in. People do not need to have their own transport. You
get out from your flat or whatever, you hail a cab if your pocket suits you.
Otherwise you hail a rick or take the bus to the station. Then you ride
miles and miles to your destination to and fro in minutes which would
otherwise take you hours on end. (even by bus). Therefore, for pure
economics and convenience, the population of two wheelers is down in Mumbai.
And in Mumbai the Government can make it mandatory for two wheeler riders to
wear helmets. I really do not know if this is so, for I have never seen any
great bulk of two wheelers there like in Goa.

Now take the case of Goa. Two wheeler is a family transport mode. The public
transport is in shambles. Given the terrain of Goa, two wheelers family
transportation is a must for low middle income families. In far away/remote
areas, the only practical mode of transport is a two wheeler. Your son or
your daughter , otherwise, will never reach college or even in some cases
to school in time. Every child wants a scooty to go to college or to
school. And in the absence of a well catered-for public transport, this
demand is increasing steadily. That is why you see more and more two wheeler
showrooms coming up in Goa. With the rip-off prices that these two
wheelers command, do they give away a helmet with the two wheeler? NOPE. You
have to buy one. That too is 99.999 % absolutely substandard and will crack
if it merely falls down. Plus we have two wheeler taxis too. If the
government makes helmets mandatory, that will mean a family of 4 (2 + 2
tots) will have to invest in 4 helmets. Do they make helmets for minors?
That means the government will have to ban carriage of children on two
wheelers if they make helmets mandatory. And where do you park the four
helmets when you park the two wheeler? You can say goodbye to the helmets if
you even lock them on the bike. So you tote you 2 tots as well as tote 4
helmets. And how do you make children to use the helmets? And does a
government department or a private company allocate place to store your
helmets? In all probability, they would have to have an extra room with an
extra guard. Is it viable?

My brother died fro a cracked skull in spite of wearing an expensive chin
guard helmet and with a mania for wearing helmet as big as life itself. It
was manufactured in INDIA. The best export quality helmets from India tested
by an international firm (SWISS) have failed miserably, even along with some
US models.

The government is in no position to enforce the mandatory helmets rule in
Goa. Let us face the facts. The government will first have to streamline the
manufacture of helmets that can withstand stringent tests. Otherwise the
Government of Goa will have to put in place a very effective urban as well
as rural public transportation system that will be up from 5 AM to 12 PM.
Or
The government should come out with a legislation that no ex-gratia payment
will be made to any two wheeler accident victim if found not wearing helmet
at the time of accident, whether it was a head injury or not.

Therefore, under the circumstances, you decide if any government in Goa can
afford to make helmets mandatory with prevailing conditions.

As for Goasuraj, we have decided that we will put a state of the art public
transport system at the hand of its people where not only two wheelers will
be a burden for the households, even 4 wheelers will be reduced in time to
come.

It could well be a very "wishful thinking" bordering on bluff, but then
that is all we have to our account. We believe that if we start with a sound
and persistent idea, it will bear fruit in time to come.

Cheers
Floriano
<<
Re; Wearing a Helmet
The responsibility of wearing a helmet when driving a two-wheeler is
that of the driver and his/her family (parents, spouse, children and
other first degree relatives) who permit him or her to do so! Crying at
the funeral and blaming the government and others for this fatal (and
preventable) accident is fruitless and non-productive. At this point we
can only learn for the accident. Regards, GL
This is the most ignorant posting I have read for a long time. He who
has composed this is bereft of logic. He never asks what the government is
there for. I live in a country that legislates for the good of its
citizens.
Let me tell this knucklehead a law in what a Goan erroneously considers a
backward country.
That country is Trinidad which though tiny, has produced a Nobel
Prize winner for literature, a world class sprinter and a batsman on par
with
Sachin Tendulkar.
After 7 p.m. a cyclist must have a light. I mean a cyclist and not a
motorcyclist. If a rider has a puncture and has no lights, he must lift
the
bike on his head and not move it with the wheels on the road.
I have said that Goans have a proclivity for thieving. They also
like
to argue. Where on earth has one seen the antics of two wheel riders. They
ride side by side on Goan roads while chatting. Most accidents on Goa's
roads
are due to the carelessness of the drivers. Goans must learn to obey
orders
and the law in particular. As Dr. Colaco has written, they have hard heads
and Mr. Lawrence, you are no exception. I have no patience for nonsence
and I
will say so. Cecil and Aiyres share this distinction with you.
Edgar Martins
Floriano Lobo
2000-12-31 20:14:10 UTC
Permalink
If you wait for the Government to provide an infrastructure and tip top bus
service, there will
be no passengers to ride the busses (when Goa Suraj comes to power) as
people
in graves do not need to move.
That would, indeed, be an ideal situation to take over the reins of Goa
from the BJP, the Congress, the MGP and the UGDP. IF THAT HAPPENED.

In that case, there would be no opposition to the "wear Helmet" rule. For
that matter Goa Su-Raj Government can go ahead and do whatever it liked and
there would be no opposition at all. It could ban the two wheeler pilots in
the first place. It could make "work helmets" mandatory for all industrial
units. It could even bring in the "wear helmet" rule for the cyclists. It
could clear all roads of illegal and legal encroachments including religious
places of worship and make roads safer for beautiful empty buses to drive.
It could even bannish the PWD and the Telecom Department from the soil of
Goa for being the biggest culprits in populating the graveyards. It could
send all the strays from the roads packing to the houses and bungalows of
the friends of the strays who help the PWD and the Telecom Department . It
could even send all the Goan bus drivers on a deputation to BEST of Mumbai
and bring in the BEST bus drivers to take over the buses in Goa. We could
sack the Transport Minister and all the RTOs over and over again until they
wisen up to the road etc. safety. And we could make the auto industry (two
wheeler manufacturers) to give away two adult helmets and one child helmet
free with the sale of each two wheeler. And we could order some brand new
backbones from Italy, Germany, Japan, USA what have you and give them free
of cost to our politicians and bureaucrats so they could take firm steps to
implement all the marvelous rules, regulations and laws that Goa Su-Raj will
bring in to make Goa that extra little peaceful for all those beautiful
people in the graveyards who will neve rise up on the election day to cast
their votes against it, to send it back to the limbo again.

Dear Edgar,
What we require is the will of STEEL in our politicians to come out with
rules and the backbones to implement them without the bother of counting
votes. I am still to see a defiant violator of the rules if the whip is a
coming to crack on the bare back. And this is what, not only Goa requires,
but INDIA requires badly. Unfortunately, Sir Winston Churchill was right
when he had predicted backbones full of straw in our Indian Politicians way
back in 1947. And I am proud to have been born in that year of accurate
prediction.

And, I am really very happy today that Sanjit Rodrigues has qualified to
take over as the Commissioner of the Panjim Municipal Corporation. If we see
some of the much missing 'steel' in the bureaucratic backbones, it is in
Sanjit's.

Cheers
Floriano

******
I fully agree and endorse GL's views.
A simple solution to a complex helmets problem.
Floriano.
Re; Wearing a Helmet
The responsibility of wearing a helmet when driving a two-wheeler is
that of the driver and his/her family (parents, spouse, children and
other first degree relatives) who permit him or her to do so! Crying at
the funeral and blaming the government and others for this fatal (and
preventable) accident is fruitless and non-productive. At this point we
can only learn for the accident. Regards, GL
#####################################################################
Floriano, I see a fluctuation in your views. You do not contradict
me
but put new obstacles in the path of progress. Let me explain.
You put the onus above on the family to see that a two whell rider
wears a helmet. Then you go into a polemical discussion on the
shortcomings
of the government who do not provide adequate busses and tell us that if
and
when Goans have a Goa Suraj government the people of Goa will not need two
wheelers. Furthermore, you criticize the standard and quality of helmets
sold
in Goa. Here is something for you to reflect on. I have lived in Goa when
busses ran eratically and they were not comfortable. I walked and did not
complain for this would not alleviate my situation. Today, the situation
is
much improved, believe me. Stop complaining. The Government (RTA) must
swindle money and hence, we lack the resourses to obviate this helmet
problem.
I own a scooter and I took a helmet with me to Goa. Many who have
died due to head injuries did not wear a helmet, not because the quality
of
the helmets sold in Goa was poor but because they felt comfortable without
one. Austin Soares often travelled abroad and his wife is an Aussie. I
have
just had an e-mail from a lady who rides a bike daily and writes to say
that
due to the heat her head itched and she has discontinued the habit. But
now
she swears that she will wear one.
I have never maintained that everyone wearing a helmet will be
saved
from death. Other factors are involved like the impact of the collission
and
the speed of the moving object. It is like sitting in a bus without a
guarantee that you will be saved if you sat at the back, front or the side
of
the bus. Same goes with planes.
1. Is wearing a helmet safer than not wearing one?
2. Should the taxpayer be responsible to defray the cost of the
ambulance and treatment?
3. Is there no trauma and stress borne by the family? Do you feel
that
the children should cope without a bread winner?
I am grieved that your brother who wore a helmet died. I maintain
that
even a paper mache helmet is better than no helmet. If you wait for the
Government to provide an infrastructure and tip top bus service, there
will
be no passengers to ride the busses (when Goa Suraj comes to power) as
people
in graves do not need to move.
Above all, we as Goans must learn discipline and not rebel (and argue)
at
every opportunity. There are virtues in obeying parents and government
laws
even if they are wrong. There is much to say of a kid who disobeys his
parents even if what he is asked to perform is wrong. From obeying we
learn
discipline and from discipline we learn to reason.
Edgar Martins
Lawrence Rodrigues
2003-05-05 06:44:56 UTC
Permalink
<<< ....most ignorant posting.......He who has composed this is bereft of
logic. He never asks what the government is there for. I live in a country
that legislates for the good of its citizens.
Let me tell this knucklehead ......
.......Goans have a proclivity for thieving. They also like to argue.
...... Most accidents on Goa's roads are due to the carelessness of the
drivers. Goans must learn to obey orders and the law in particular. ....
they have hard heads and Mr. Lawrence, you are no exception. I have no
patience for nonsence and I will say so. Cecil and Aiyres share this
distinction with you. - Edgar Martins >>>



There, but for the Grace of God, goes I.


Lawrence
EdgarStmartins
2003-05-05 16:52:47 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for the compliment. Here for you is a quote:

MY PRAYER TO GOD IS A VERY SHORT ONE: "OH LORD, MAKE MY ENEMIES LOOK
RIDICULOUS". THIS GOES FOR YOUR ILK CECIL AND AIYRES TOO.

Edgar Martins
Lawrence Rodrigues
2003-05-05 06:44:56 UTC
Permalink
<<< ....most ignorant posting.......He who has composed this is bereft of
logic. He never asks what the government is there for. I live in a country
that legislates for the good of its citizens.
Let me tell this knucklehead ......
.......Goans have a proclivity for thieving. They also like to argue.
...... Most accidents on Goa's roads are due to the carelessness of the
drivers. Goans must learn to obey orders and the law in particular. ....
they have hard heads and Mr. Lawrence, you are no exception. I have no
patience for nonsence and I will say so. Cecil and Aiyres share this
distinction with you. - Edgar Martins >>>



There, but for the Grace of God, goes I.


Lawrence
EdgarStmartins
2003-05-05 16:52:47 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for the compliment. Here for you is a quote:

MY PRAYER TO GOD IS A VERY SHORT ONE: "OH LORD, MAKE MY ENEMIES LOOK
RIDICULOUS". THIS GOES FOR YOUR ILK CECIL AND AIYRES TOO.

Edgar Martins
Lawrence Rodrigues
2003-05-05 06:44:56 UTC
Permalink
<<< ....most ignorant posting.......He who has composed this is bereft of
logic. He never asks what the government is there for. I live in a country
that legislates for the good of its citizens.
Let me tell this knucklehead ......
.......Goans have a proclivity for thieving. They also like to argue.
...... Most accidents on Goa's roads are due to the carelessness of the
drivers. Goans must learn to obey orders and the law in particular. ....
they have hard heads and Mr. Lawrence, you are no exception. I have no
patience for nonsence and I will say so. Cecil and Aiyres share this
distinction with you. - Edgar Martins >>>



There, but for the Grace of God, goes I.


Lawrence
EdgarStmartins
2003-05-05 16:52:47 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for the compliment. Here for you is a quote:

MY PRAYER TO GOD IS A VERY SHORT ONE: "OH LORD, MAKE MY ENEMIES LOOK
RIDICULOUS". THIS GOES FOR YOUR ILK CECIL AND AIYRES TOO.

Edgar Martins
Lawrence Rodrigues
2003-05-05 06:44:56 UTC
Permalink
<<< ....most ignorant posting.......He who has composed this is bereft of
logic. He never asks what the government is there for. I live in a country
that legislates for the good of its citizens.
Let me tell this knucklehead ......
.......Goans have a proclivity for thieving. They also like to argue.
...... Most accidents on Goa's roads are due to the carelessness of the
drivers. Goans must learn to obey orders and the law in particular. ....
they have hard heads and Mr. Lawrence, you are no exception. I have no
patience for nonsence and I will say so. Cecil and Aiyres share this
distinction with you. - Edgar Martins >>>



There, but for the Grace of God, goes I.


Lawrence
EdgarStmartins
2003-05-05 16:52:47 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for the compliment. Here for you is a quote:

MY PRAYER TO GOD IS A VERY SHORT ONE: "OH LORD, MAKE MY ENEMIES LOOK
RIDICULOUS". THIS GOES FOR YOUR ILK CECIL AND AIYRES TOO.

Edgar Martins
Lawrence Rodrigues
2003-05-05 06:44:56 UTC
Permalink
<<< ....most ignorant posting.......He who has composed this is bereft of
logic. He never asks what the government is there for. I live in a country
that legislates for the good of its citizens.
Let me tell this knucklehead ......
.......Goans have a proclivity for thieving. They also like to argue.
...... Most accidents on Goa's roads are due to the carelessness of the
drivers. Goans must learn to obey orders and the law in particular. ....
they have hard heads and Mr. Lawrence, you are no exception. I have no
patience for nonsence and I will say so. Cecil and Aiyres share this
distinction with you. - Edgar Martins >>>



There, but for the Grace of God, goes I.


Lawrence
EdgarStmartins
2003-05-05 16:52:47 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for the compliment. Here for you is a quote:

MY PRAYER TO GOD IS A VERY SHORT ONE: "OH LORD, MAKE MY ENEMIES LOOK
RIDICULOUS". THIS GOES FOR YOUR ILK CECIL AND AIYRES TOO.

Edgar Martins
Lawrence Rodrigues
2003-05-05 06:44:56 UTC
Permalink
<<< ....most ignorant posting.......He who has composed this is bereft of
logic. He never asks what the government is there for. I live in a country
that legislates for the good of its citizens.
Let me tell this knucklehead ......
.......Goans have a proclivity for thieving. They also like to argue.
...... Most accidents on Goa's roads are due to the carelessness of the
drivers. Goans must learn to obey orders and the law in particular. ....
they have hard heads and Mr. Lawrence, you are no exception. I have no
patience for nonsence and I will say so. Cecil and Aiyres share this
distinction with you. - Edgar Martins >>>



There, but for the Grace of God, goes I.


Lawrence
EdgarStmartins
2003-05-05 16:52:47 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for the compliment. Here for you is a quote:

MY PRAYER TO GOD IS A VERY SHORT ONE: "OH LORD, MAKE MY ENEMIES LOOK
RIDICULOUS". THIS GOES FOR YOUR ILK CECIL AND AIYRES TOO.

Edgar Martins
Lawrence Rodrigues
2003-05-05 06:44:56 UTC
Permalink
<<< ....most ignorant posting.......He who has composed this is bereft of
logic. He never asks what the government is there for. I live in a country
that legislates for the good of its citizens.
Let me tell this knucklehead ......
.......Goans have a proclivity for thieving. They also like to argue.
...... Most accidents on Goa's roads are due to the carelessness of the
drivers. Goans must learn to obey orders and the law in particular. ....
they have hard heads and Mr. Lawrence, you are no exception. I have no
patience for nonsence and I will say so. Cecil and Aiyres share this
distinction with you. - Edgar Martins >>>



There, but for the Grace of God, goes I.


Lawrence
EdgarStmartins
2003-05-05 16:52:47 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for the compliment. Here for you is a quote:

MY PRAYER TO GOD IS A VERY SHORT ONE: "OH LORD, MAKE MY ENEMIES LOOK
RIDICULOUS". THIS GOES FOR YOUR ILK CECIL AND AIYRES TOO.

Edgar Martins

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