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NEWS: Goan tradition comes full circle (ToI)
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Goanet News
2011-06-07 21:28:20 UTC
Permalink
Goan tradition comes full circle
Ankit Ajmera, Mumbai Mirror | Jun 7, 2011, 11.55am IST

Goan tradition comes full circle
A Portuguese dance group arrives in the city to perform traditional
Goan dance and music

Many years ago when the Portuguese arrived in Goa, their western
culture had a deep influence on the natives. It was in Goa that Indian
musicians are believed to have first incorporated western musical and
dance forms into their compositions. A lot of Goans even migrated to
Portugal in the hope of better education and livelihood.

The tradition seems to be coming full circle from India to Portugal
and back to India. A Portuguese song and dance group, of Indian
origin, called Casa de Goa's Ekvat Group, comprised people who
migrated, are coming to perform in the city. The Kantar Goa programme
has been organised by the Indian Council for Cultural Relations. The
group will perform traditional Goan harvest dances including Deknnis
and Mandos.

The group has given an Indian twist to the dance form of Deknnis by
relating it to the Hindu god, Krishna. Dekhni in Konkani language
means 'bewitching beauty'. This songcum-dance was originally performed
only by women. Set to western rhythms and Indian melody, it depicted
the story of a devdasi (temple dancers) who has an appointment to go
across the river to perform at a wedding. However, the boatman is
adamant and will not take her across. As a bribe she offers her
jewellery and later seduces him with her mesmerising dance.

In Ekvat Group's version of the dance, they have introduced a male
dancer in the form of Krishna holding a flute. "Krishna is a Hindu
god, but he reminds us of the roots we have in India," says Virginia
Bras Gomes, a singer from the group. "The setting has been changed and
does not include the boatman and the devdasi anymore. Along with
Krishna there are many Gopis who are enjoying the act of dancing and
romancing."

As a matter of fact, one of the very famous Deknnis songs titled Hanv
Saiba Poltodi Vetami also found its way into the Hindi film industry
when it was adapted by Raj Kapoor as Na mangoon sona chandi for the
film Bobby.

The Mandos dance form is traditionally considered elite and was
performed at grand celebrations, special functions and weddings. It
consists of 'real' love songs which have slow melody and luminous
imagery.

"During the migration, many Goans decided to settle down in Portugal
forever. So there were stories of longing for the native land and
broken hearts and romances. Mandos is a reflection of those feelings,"
says Gomes.

Ekvat Group has 25 members. Only 4 members of the group were born in
Goa. Rest of them were born in Portugal to Indian parents. The group
was founded in 1989 in Lisbon (Portugal) with the objective of making
traditional music and dances of Goa known to a wider audience,
specially the younger ones to discover the ancestral culture. "If the
young don't keep your tradition alive, it's ultimately going to
vanish.

We are doing our part so that we can transmit it and possibly get the
young generation to continue it," says Gomes.

Ankit.Ajmera at timesgroup.com

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/nri/art-culture/Goan-tradition-comes-full-circle/articleshow/8758328.cms
Goanet News
2011-06-07 21:28:20 UTC
Permalink
Goan tradition comes full circle
Ankit Ajmera, Mumbai Mirror | Jun 7, 2011, 11.55am IST

Goan tradition comes full circle
A Portuguese dance group arrives in the city to perform traditional
Goan dance and music

Many years ago when the Portuguese arrived in Goa, their western
culture had a deep influence on the natives. It was in Goa that Indian
musicians are believed to have first incorporated western musical and
dance forms into their compositions. A lot of Goans even migrated to
Portugal in the hope of better education and livelihood.

The tradition seems to be coming full circle from India to Portugal
and back to India. A Portuguese song and dance group, of Indian
origin, called Casa de Goa's Ekvat Group, comprised people who
migrated, are coming to perform in the city. The Kantar Goa programme
has been organised by the Indian Council for Cultural Relations. The
group will perform traditional Goan harvest dances including Deknnis
and Mandos.

The group has given an Indian twist to the dance form of Deknnis by
relating it to the Hindu god, Krishna. Dekhni in Konkani language
means 'bewitching beauty'. This songcum-dance was originally performed
only by women. Set to western rhythms and Indian melody, it depicted
the story of a devdasi (temple dancers) who has an appointment to go
across the river to perform at a wedding. However, the boatman is
adamant and will not take her across. As a bribe she offers her
jewellery and later seduces him with her mesmerising dance.

In Ekvat Group's version of the dance, they have introduced a male
dancer in the form of Krishna holding a flute. "Krishna is a Hindu
god, but he reminds us of the roots we have in India," says Virginia
Bras Gomes, a singer from the group. "The setting has been changed and
does not include the boatman and the devdasi anymore. Along with
Krishna there are many Gopis who are enjoying the act of dancing and
romancing."

As a matter of fact, one of the very famous Deknnis songs titled Hanv
Saiba Poltodi Vetami also found its way into the Hindi film industry
when it was adapted by Raj Kapoor as Na mangoon sona chandi for the
film Bobby.

The Mandos dance form is traditionally considered elite and was
performed at grand celebrations, special functions and weddings. It
consists of 'real' love songs which have slow melody and luminous
imagery.

"During the migration, many Goans decided to settle down in Portugal
forever. So there were stories of longing for the native land and
broken hearts and romances. Mandos is a reflection of those feelings,"
says Gomes.

Ekvat Group has 25 members. Only 4 members of the group were born in
Goa. Rest of them were born in Portugal to Indian parents. The group
was founded in 1989 in Lisbon (Portugal) with the objective of making
traditional music and dances of Goa known to a wider audience,
specially the younger ones to discover the ancestral culture. "If the
young don't keep your tradition alive, it's ultimately going to
vanish.

We are doing our part so that we can transmit it and possibly get the
young generation to continue it," says Gomes.

Ankit.Ajmera at timesgroup.com

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/nri/art-culture/Goan-tradition-comes-full-circle/articleshow/8758328.cms
Goanet News
2011-06-07 21:28:20 UTC
Permalink
Goan tradition comes full circle
Ankit Ajmera, Mumbai Mirror | Jun 7, 2011, 11.55am IST

Goan tradition comes full circle
A Portuguese dance group arrives in the city to perform traditional
Goan dance and music

Many years ago when the Portuguese arrived in Goa, their western
culture had a deep influence on the natives. It was in Goa that Indian
musicians are believed to have first incorporated western musical and
dance forms into their compositions. A lot of Goans even migrated to
Portugal in the hope of better education and livelihood.

The tradition seems to be coming full circle from India to Portugal
and back to India. A Portuguese song and dance group, of Indian
origin, called Casa de Goa's Ekvat Group, comprised people who
migrated, are coming to perform in the city. The Kantar Goa programme
has been organised by the Indian Council for Cultural Relations. The
group will perform traditional Goan harvest dances including Deknnis
and Mandos.

The group has given an Indian twist to the dance form of Deknnis by
relating it to the Hindu god, Krishna. Dekhni in Konkani language
means 'bewitching beauty'. This songcum-dance was originally performed
only by women. Set to western rhythms and Indian melody, it depicted
the story of a devdasi (temple dancers) who has an appointment to go
across the river to perform at a wedding. However, the boatman is
adamant and will not take her across. As a bribe she offers her
jewellery and later seduces him with her mesmerising dance.

In Ekvat Group's version of the dance, they have introduced a male
dancer in the form of Krishna holding a flute. "Krishna is a Hindu
god, but he reminds us of the roots we have in India," says Virginia
Bras Gomes, a singer from the group. "The setting has been changed and
does not include the boatman and the devdasi anymore. Along with
Krishna there are many Gopis who are enjoying the act of dancing and
romancing."

As a matter of fact, one of the very famous Deknnis songs titled Hanv
Saiba Poltodi Vetami also found its way into the Hindi film industry
when it was adapted by Raj Kapoor as Na mangoon sona chandi for the
film Bobby.

The Mandos dance form is traditionally considered elite and was
performed at grand celebrations, special functions and weddings. It
consists of 'real' love songs which have slow melody and luminous
imagery.

"During the migration, many Goans decided to settle down in Portugal
forever. So there were stories of longing for the native land and
broken hearts and romances. Mandos is a reflection of those feelings,"
says Gomes.

Ekvat Group has 25 members. Only 4 members of the group were born in
Goa. Rest of them were born in Portugal to Indian parents. The group
was founded in 1989 in Lisbon (Portugal) with the objective of making
traditional music and dances of Goa known to a wider audience,
specially the younger ones to discover the ancestral culture. "If the
young don't keep your tradition alive, it's ultimately going to
vanish.

We are doing our part so that we can transmit it and possibly get the
young generation to continue it," says Gomes.

Ankit.Ajmera at timesgroup.com

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/nri/art-culture/Goan-tradition-comes-full-circle/articleshow/8758328.cms
Goanet News
2011-06-07 21:28:20 UTC
Permalink
Goan tradition comes full circle
Ankit Ajmera, Mumbai Mirror | Jun 7, 2011, 11.55am IST

Goan tradition comes full circle
A Portuguese dance group arrives in the city to perform traditional
Goan dance and music

Many years ago when the Portuguese arrived in Goa, their western
culture had a deep influence on the natives. It was in Goa that Indian
musicians are believed to have first incorporated western musical and
dance forms into their compositions. A lot of Goans even migrated to
Portugal in the hope of better education and livelihood.

The tradition seems to be coming full circle from India to Portugal
and back to India. A Portuguese song and dance group, of Indian
origin, called Casa de Goa's Ekvat Group, comprised people who
migrated, are coming to perform in the city. The Kantar Goa programme
has been organised by the Indian Council for Cultural Relations. The
group will perform traditional Goan harvest dances including Deknnis
and Mandos.

The group has given an Indian twist to the dance form of Deknnis by
relating it to the Hindu god, Krishna. Dekhni in Konkani language
means 'bewitching beauty'. This songcum-dance was originally performed
only by women. Set to western rhythms and Indian melody, it depicted
the story of a devdasi (temple dancers) who has an appointment to go
across the river to perform at a wedding. However, the boatman is
adamant and will not take her across. As a bribe she offers her
jewellery and later seduces him with her mesmerising dance.

In Ekvat Group's version of the dance, they have introduced a male
dancer in the form of Krishna holding a flute. "Krishna is a Hindu
god, but he reminds us of the roots we have in India," says Virginia
Bras Gomes, a singer from the group. "The setting has been changed and
does not include the boatman and the devdasi anymore. Along with
Krishna there are many Gopis who are enjoying the act of dancing and
romancing."

As a matter of fact, one of the very famous Deknnis songs titled Hanv
Saiba Poltodi Vetami also found its way into the Hindi film industry
when it was adapted by Raj Kapoor as Na mangoon sona chandi for the
film Bobby.

The Mandos dance form is traditionally considered elite and was
performed at grand celebrations, special functions and weddings. It
consists of 'real' love songs which have slow melody and luminous
imagery.

"During the migration, many Goans decided to settle down in Portugal
forever. So there were stories of longing for the native land and
broken hearts and romances. Mandos is a reflection of those feelings,"
says Gomes.

Ekvat Group has 25 members. Only 4 members of the group were born in
Goa. Rest of them were born in Portugal to Indian parents. The group
was founded in 1989 in Lisbon (Portugal) with the objective of making
traditional music and dances of Goa known to a wider audience,
specially the younger ones to discover the ancestral culture. "If the
young don't keep your tradition alive, it's ultimately going to
vanish.

We are doing our part so that we can transmit it and possibly get the
young generation to continue it," says Gomes.

Ankit.Ajmera at timesgroup.com

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/nri/art-culture/Goan-tradition-comes-full-circle/articleshow/8758328.cms
Goanet News
2011-06-07 21:28:20 UTC
Permalink
Goan tradition comes full circle
Ankit Ajmera, Mumbai Mirror | Jun 7, 2011, 11.55am IST

Goan tradition comes full circle
A Portuguese dance group arrives in the city to perform traditional
Goan dance and music

Many years ago when the Portuguese arrived in Goa, their western
culture had a deep influence on the natives. It was in Goa that Indian
musicians are believed to have first incorporated western musical and
dance forms into their compositions. A lot of Goans even migrated to
Portugal in the hope of better education and livelihood.

The tradition seems to be coming full circle from India to Portugal
and back to India. A Portuguese song and dance group, of Indian
origin, called Casa de Goa's Ekvat Group, comprised people who
migrated, are coming to perform in the city. The Kantar Goa programme
has been organised by the Indian Council for Cultural Relations. The
group will perform traditional Goan harvest dances including Deknnis
and Mandos.

The group has given an Indian twist to the dance form of Deknnis by
relating it to the Hindu god, Krishna. Dekhni in Konkani language
means 'bewitching beauty'. This songcum-dance was originally performed
only by women. Set to western rhythms and Indian melody, it depicted
the story of a devdasi (temple dancers) who has an appointment to go
across the river to perform at a wedding. However, the boatman is
adamant and will not take her across. As a bribe she offers her
jewellery and later seduces him with her mesmerising dance.

In Ekvat Group's version of the dance, they have introduced a male
dancer in the form of Krishna holding a flute. "Krishna is a Hindu
god, but he reminds us of the roots we have in India," says Virginia
Bras Gomes, a singer from the group. "The setting has been changed and
does not include the boatman and the devdasi anymore. Along with
Krishna there are many Gopis who are enjoying the act of dancing and
romancing."

As a matter of fact, one of the very famous Deknnis songs titled Hanv
Saiba Poltodi Vetami also found its way into the Hindi film industry
when it was adapted by Raj Kapoor as Na mangoon sona chandi for the
film Bobby.

The Mandos dance form is traditionally considered elite and was
performed at grand celebrations, special functions and weddings. It
consists of 'real' love songs which have slow melody and luminous
imagery.

"During the migration, many Goans decided to settle down in Portugal
forever. So there were stories of longing for the native land and
broken hearts and romances. Mandos is a reflection of those feelings,"
says Gomes.

Ekvat Group has 25 members. Only 4 members of the group were born in
Goa. Rest of them were born in Portugal to Indian parents. The group
was founded in 1989 in Lisbon (Portugal) with the objective of making
traditional music and dances of Goa known to a wider audience,
specially the younger ones to discover the ancestral culture. "If the
young don't keep your tradition alive, it's ultimately going to
vanish.

We are doing our part so that we can transmit it and possibly get the
young generation to continue it," says Gomes.

Ankit.Ajmera at timesgroup.com

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/nri/art-culture/Goan-tradition-comes-full-circle/articleshow/8758328.cms
Goanet News
2011-06-07 21:28:20 UTC
Permalink
Goan tradition comes full circle
Ankit Ajmera, Mumbai Mirror | Jun 7, 2011, 11.55am IST

Goan tradition comes full circle
A Portuguese dance group arrives in the city to perform traditional
Goan dance and music

Many years ago when the Portuguese arrived in Goa, their western
culture had a deep influence on the natives. It was in Goa that Indian
musicians are believed to have first incorporated western musical and
dance forms into their compositions. A lot of Goans even migrated to
Portugal in the hope of better education and livelihood.

The tradition seems to be coming full circle from India to Portugal
and back to India. A Portuguese song and dance group, of Indian
origin, called Casa de Goa's Ekvat Group, comprised people who
migrated, are coming to perform in the city. The Kantar Goa programme
has been organised by the Indian Council for Cultural Relations. The
group will perform traditional Goan harvest dances including Deknnis
and Mandos.

The group has given an Indian twist to the dance form of Deknnis by
relating it to the Hindu god, Krishna. Dekhni in Konkani language
means 'bewitching beauty'. This songcum-dance was originally performed
only by women. Set to western rhythms and Indian melody, it depicted
the story of a devdasi (temple dancers) who has an appointment to go
across the river to perform at a wedding. However, the boatman is
adamant and will not take her across. As a bribe she offers her
jewellery and later seduces him with her mesmerising dance.

In Ekvat Group's version of the dance, they have introduced a male
dancer in the form of Krishna holding a flute. "Krishna is a Hindu
god, but he reminds us of the roots we have in India," says Virginia
Bras Gomes, a singer from the group. "The setting has been changed and
does not include the boatman and the devdasi anymore. Along with
Krishna there are many Gopis who are enjoying the act of dancing and
romancing."

As a matter of fact, one of the very famous Deknnis songs titled Hanv
Saiba Poltodi Vetami also found its way into the Hindi film industry
when it was adapted by Raj Kapoor as Na mangoon sona chandi for the
film Bobby.

The Mandos dance form is traditionally considered elite and was
performed at grand celebrations, special functions and weddings. It
consists of 'real' love songs which have slow melody and luminous
imagery.

"During the migration, many Goans decided to settle down in Portugal
forever. So there were stories of longing for the native land and
broken hearts and romances. Mandos is a reflection of those feelings,"
says Gomes.

Ekvat Group has 25 members. Only 4 members of the group were born in
Goa. Rest of them were born in Portugal to Indian parents. The group
was founded in 1989 in Lisbon (Portugal) with the objective of making
traditional music and dances of Goa known to a wider audience,
specially the younger ones to discover the ancestral culture. "If the
young don't keep your tradition alive, it's ultimately going to
vanish.

We are doing our part so that we can transmit it and possibly get the
young generation to continue it," says Gomes.

Ankit.Ajmera at timesgroup.com

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/nri/art-culture/Goan-tradition-comes-full-circle/articleshow/8758328.cms
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