Discussion:
[Goanet] Full day school in Goa, makes sense?
Tony de Sa
2011-03-01 17:43:11 UTC
Permalink
sunil dsouza <dsouzamail at gmail.com>
Dear Percy,
I have read your views on GoaNet on above subject and i also feel that
present state of infrastructure is not sufficient ....
(truncated)
Are all the learned/ educated
*academicians * asleep?

Dear Mr. de Souza,
To sweepingly imply or suggest that the community of *academicians* is
asleep is a bit drastic to say the very least. Please refer to the Central
Right to Education Act with regard to the number of school working hours.
When Kapil Sibal passed the act, the country welcomed it as an act that
would "boost" the standards of Education in the country.
Remember age old wisdom that says "nothing comes for nothing." There's
always a price to pay! So stop squealing. If you are a parent and you want
the thing stopped or implemented slowly till infrastructure is built up, try
having a PTA meeting and voicing your dissent. If you are a teacher, bang
goes your tuition business (with due apologies to those who do not indulge
in the business) Teacher-cum-LIC/ Bajaj Alianz/ Ing Vaisya/ other insurance
agent? Bad luck ole boy.
Be realistic and philosophical. Remember what cannot be changed must be
endured.
--
Tony de Sa. tonydesa at gmail dot com

^v^v^v^v^v^v^v^v^v^v^v^v^v^v^v^v^v^v^v^v^v^v^v^v^v
SOTER
2011-03-04 07:10:39 UTC
Permalink
Tony wrote:
To sweepingly imply or suggest that the community of *academicians* is
asleep is a bit drastic to say the very least. Please refer to the Central
Right to Education Act with regard to the number of school working hours.
When Kapil Sibal passed the act, the country welcomed it as an act that
would "boost" the standards of Education in the country.
Remember age old wisdom that says "nothing comes for nothing." There's
always a price to pay! So stop squealing. If you are a parent and you want
the thing stopped or implemented slowly till infrastructure is built up, try
having a PTA meeting and voicing your dissent. If you are a teacher, bang
goes your tuition business (with due apologies to those who do not indulge
in the business) Teacher-cum-LIC/ Bajaj Alianz/ Ing Vaisya/ other insurance
agent? Bad luck ole boy.
Be realistic and philosophical. Remember what cannot be changed must be
endured.


Comment:
Eradicate one evil and create ten? Is it this that Tony is advocating.
The problem in this country is that everyone looks at particular issues with
blinkers.
The concerned ministry will take policy decisions exclusively from the
interest of the particular sector.
The adverse impact on other sectors in the process is never ever weighed or
acknowledged.
So to tame the teacher who is an LIC agent, tutor, politician, matka bookie,
introduce full day classes.
The crooked will always find loop holes to escape.
But in the process the city roads will be clogged with school buses and
vehicles of office-goers.
The commuters who travel in already crowded public transport will be thrown
into a further difficulty with the school crowd and office going crowd
converging at the bus stop at the same time.
Then the same mess will repeat after school hours. When will children living
in far flung areas reach home? Some teachers travel from Pernem to Margao or
vice versa. What will happen to them? Is teaching a joke? Teachers bring
home exam answer papers for corrections. Are those hours counted?
Very often female teachers have to manage home and work. What happens to
them? In the same breath we talk of women empowerment.
What happens to hundreds of students who get trained in various other skills
which are not imparted in their schools?
Has anyone considered the increased burden on electricity and water
consumption?
Have all these aspects been considered?
Modern day parents will only be too happy as full day school only helps keep
their children at
bay for some more time. But how will this improve education.
or, will it be like jumping from the frying pan into the fire?

-Soter
colaco1 at gmail.com (J. Colaco )
2011-03-04 13:53:07 UTC
Permalink
Well said, SOTER!!

BTW: The said Act is not an "administrative act" that was enacted by
any Department or "passed by any Sibal". It was enacted (passed) by
Parliament.

jc

Tony wrote: Please refer to the Central Right to Education Act with
regard to the number of school working hours. When Kapil Sibal passed
the act,
Post by Tony de Sa
To sweepingly imply or suggest that the community of *academicians* is
asleep is a bit drastic to say the very least. Please refer to the Central
Right to Education Act with regard to the number of school working hours.
When Kapil Sibal passed the act, the country welcomed it as an act that
would "boost" the standards of Education in the country.
Remember age old wisdom that says "nothing comes for nothing." There's
always a price to pay! So stop squealing. If you are a parent and you want
the thing stopped or implemented slowly till infrastructure is built up, try
having a PTA meeting and voicing your dissent. If you are a teacher, bang
goes your tuition business (with due apologies to those who do not indulge
in the business) Teacher-cum-LIC/ Bajaj Alianz/ Ing Vaisya/ other insurance
agent? Bad luck ole boy.
Be realistic and philosophical. Remember what cannot be changed must be
endured.
Eradicate one evil and create ten? Is it this that Tony is advocating.
The problem in this country is that everyone looks at particular issues with
blinkers.
The concerned ministry will take policy decisions exclusively from the
interest of the particular sector.
The adverse impact on other sectors in the process is never ever weighed or
acknowledged.
So to tame the teacher who is an LIC agent, tutor, politician, matka bookie,
introduce full day classes.
The crooked will always find loop holes to escape.
But in the process the city roads will be clogged with school buses and
vehicles of office-goers.
The commuters who travel in already crowded public transport will be thrown
into a further difficulty with the school crowd and office going crowd
converging at the bus stop at the same time.
Then the same mess will repeat after school hours. When will children living
in far flung areas reach home? Some teachers travel from Pernem to Margao or
vice versa. What will happen to them? Is teaching a joke? Teachers bring
home exam answer papers for corrections. Are those hours counted?
Very often female teachers have to manage home and work. What happens to
them? In the same breath we talk of women empowerment.
What happens to hundreds of students who get trained in various other skills
which are not imparted in their schools?
Has anyone considered the increased burden on electricity and water
consumption?
Have all these aspects been considered?
Modern day parents will only be too happy as full day school only helps keep
their children at
bay for some more time. But how will this improve education.
or, will it be like jumping from the frying pan into the fire?
-Soter
colaco1 at gmail.com (J. Colaco )
2011-03-04 13:53:07 UTC
Permalink
Well said, SOTER!!

BTW: The said Act is not an "administrative act" that was enacted by
any Department or "passed by any Sibal". It was enacted (passed) by
Parliament.

jc

Tony wrote: Please refer to the Central Right to Education Act with
regard to the number of school working hours. When Kapil Sibal passed
the act,
Post by Tony de Sa
To sweepingly imply or suggest that the community of *academicians* is
asleep is a bit drastic to say the very least. Please refer to the Central
Right to Education Act with regard to the number of school working hours.
When Kapil Sibal passed the act, the country welcomed it as an act that
would "boost" the standards of Education in the country.
Remember age old wisdom that says "nothing comes for nothing." There's
always a price to pay! So stop squealing. If you are a parent and you want
the thing stopped or implemented slowly till infrastructure is built up, try
having a PTA meeting and voicing your dissent. If you are a teacher, bang
goes your tuition business (with due apologies to those who do not indulge
in the business) Teacher-cum-LIC/ Bajaj Alianz/ Ing Vaisya/ other insurance
agent? Bad luck ole boy.
Be realistic and philosophical. Remember what cannot be changed must be
endured.
Eradicate one evil and create ten? Is it this that Tony is advocating.
The problem in this country is that everyone looks at particular issues with
blinkers.
The concerned ministry will take policy decisions exclusively from the
interest of the particular sector.
The adverse impact on other sectors in the process is never ever weighed or
acknowledged.
So to tame the teacher who is an LIC agent, tutor, politician, matka bookie,
introduce full day classes.
The crooked will always find loop holes to escape.
But in the process the city roads will be clogged with school buses and
vehicles of office-goers.
The commuters who travel in already crowded public transport will be thrown
into a further difficulty with the school crowd and office going crowd
converging at the bus stop at the same time.
Then the same mess will repeat after school hours. When will children living
in far flung areas reach home? Some teachers travel from Pernem to Margao or
vice versa. What will happen to them? Is teaching a joke? Teachers bring
home exam answer papers for corrections. Are those hours counted?
Very often female teachers have to manage home and work. What happens to
them? In the same breath we talk of women empowerment.
What happens to hundreds of students who get trained in various other skills
which are not imparted in their schools?
Has anyone considered the increased burden on electricity and water
consumption?
Have all these aspects been considered?
Modern day parents will only be too happy as full day school only helps keep
their children at
bay for some more time. But how will this improve education.
or, will it be like jumping from the frying pan into the fire?
-Soter
colaco1 at gmail.com (J. Colaco )
2011-03-04 13:53:07 UTC
Permalink
Well said, SOTER!!

BTW: The said Act is not an "administrative act" that was enacted by
any Department or "passed by any Sibal". It was enacted (passed) by
Parliament.

jc

Tony wrote: Please refer to the Central Right to Education Act with
regard to the number of school working hours. When Kapil Sibal passed
the act,
Post by Tony de Sa
To sweepingly imply or suggest that the community of *academicians* is
asleep is a bit drastic to say the very least. Please refer to the Central
Right to Education Act with regard to the number of school working hours.
When Kapil Sibal passed the act, the country welcomed it as an act that
would "boost" the standards of Education in the country.
Remember age old wisdom that says "nothing comes for nothing." There's
always a price to pay! So stop squealing. If you are a parent and you want
the thing stopped or implemented slowly till infrastructure is built up, try
having a PTA meeting and voicing your dissent. If you are a teacher, bang
goes your tuition business (with due apologies to those who do not indulge
in the business) Teacher-cum-LIC/ Bajaj Alianz/ Ing Vaisya/ other insurance
agent? Bad luck ole boy.
Be realistic and philosophical. Remember what cannot be changed must be
endured.
Eradicate one evil and create ten? Is it this that Tony is advocating.
The problem in this country is that everyone looks at particular issues with
blinkers.
The concerned ministry will take policy decisions exclusively from the
interest of the particular sector.
The adverse impact on other sectors in the process is never ever weighed or
acknowledged.
So to tame the teacher who is an LIC agent, tutor, politician, matka bookie,
introduce full day classes.
The crooked will always find loop holes to escape.
But in the process the city roads will be clogged with school buses and
vehicles of office-goers.
The commuters who travel in already crowded public transport will be thrown
into a further difficulty with the school crowd and office going crowd
converging at the bus stop at the same time.
Then the same mess will repeat after school hours. When will children living
in far flung areas reach home? Some teachers travel from Pernem to Margao or
vice versa. What will happen to them? Is teaching a joke? Teachers bring
home exam answer papers for corrections. Are those hours counted?
Very often female teachers have to manage home and work. What happens to
them? In the same breath we talk of women empowerment.
What happens to hundreds of students who get trained in various other skills
which are not imparted in their schools?
Has anyone considered the increased burden on electricity and water
consumption?
Have all these aspects been considered?
Modern day parents will only be too happy as full day school only helps keep
their children at
bay for some more time. But how will this improve education.
or, will it be like jumping from the frying pan into the fire?
-Soter
colaco1 at gmail.com (J. Colaco )
2011-03-04 13:53:07 UTC
Permalink
Well said, SOTER!!

BTW: The said Act is not an "administrative act" that was enacted by
any Department or "passed by any Sibal". It was enacted (passed) by
Parliament.

jc

Tony wrote: Please refer to the Central Right to Education Act with
regard to the number of school working hours. When Kapil Sibal passed
the act,
Post by Tony de Sa
To sweepingly imply or suggest that the community of *academicians* is
asleep is a bit drastic to say the very least. Please refer to the Central
Right to Education Act with regard to the number of school working hours.
When Kapil Sibal passed the act, the country welcomed it as an act that
would "boost" the standards of Education in the country.
Remember age old wisdom that says "nothing comes for nothing." There's
always a price to pay! So stop squealing. If you are a parent and you want
the thing stopped or implemented slowly till infrastructure is built up, try
having a PTA meeting and voicing your dissent. If you are a teacher, bang
goes your tuition business (with due apologies to those who do not indulge
in the business) Teacher-cum-LIC/ Bajaj Alianz/ Ing Vaisya/ other insurance
agent? Bad luck ole boy.
Be realistic and philosophical. Remember what cannot be changed must be
endured.
Eradicate one evil and create ten? Is it this that Tony is advocating.
The problem in this country is that everyone looks at particular issues with
blinkers.
The concerned ministry will take policy decisions exclusively from the
interest of the particular sector.
The adverse impact on other sectors in the process is never ever weighed or
acknowledged.
So to tame the teacher who is an LIC agent, tutor, politician, matka bookie,
introduce full day classes.
The crooked will always find loop holes to escape.
But in the process the city roads will be clogged with school buses and
vehicles of office-goers.
The commuters who travel in already crowded public transport will be thrown
into a further difficulty with the school crowd and office going crowd
converging at the bus stop at the same time.
Then the same mess will repeat after school hours. When will children living
in far flung areas reach home? Some teachers travel from Pernem to Margao or
vice versa. What will happen to them? Is teaching a joke? Teachers bring
home exam answer papers for corrections. Are those hours counted?
Very often female teachers have to manage home and work. What happens to
them? In the same breath we talk of women empowerment.
What happens to hundreds of students who get trained in various other skills
which are not imparted in their schools?
Has anyone considered the increased burden on electricity and water
consumption?
Have all these aspects been considered?
Modern day parents will only be too happy as full day school only helps keep
their children at
bay for some more time. But how will this improve education.
or, will it be like jumping from the frying pan into the fire?
-Soter
colaco1 at gmail.com (J. Colaco )
2011-03-04 13:53:07 UTC
Permalink
Well said, SOTER!!

BTW: The said Act is not an "administrative act" that was enacted by
any Department or "passed by any Sibal". It was enacted (passed) by
Parliament.

jc

Tony wrote: Please refer to the Central Right to Education Act with
regard to the number of school working hours. When Kapil Sibal passed
the act,
Post by Tony de Sa
To sweepingly imply or suggest that the community of *academicians* is
asleep is a bit drastic to say the very least. Please refer to the Central
Right to Education Act with regard to the number of school working hours.
When Kapil Sibal passed the act, the country welcomed it as an act that
would "boost" the standards of Education in the country.
Remember age old wisdom that says "nothing comes for nothing." There's
always a price to pay! So stop squealing. If you are a parent and you want
the thing stopped or implemented slowly till infrastructure is built up, try
having a PTA meeting and voicing your dissent. If you are a teacher, bang
goes your tuition business (with due apologies to those who do not indulge
in the business) Teacher-cum-LIC/ Bajaj Alianz/ Ing Vaisya/ other insurance
agent? Bad luck ole boy.
Be realistic and philosophical. Remember what cannot be changed must be
endured.
Eradicate one evil and create ten? Is it this that Tony is advocating.
The problem in this country is that everyone looks at particular issues with
blinkers.
The concerned ministry will take policy decisions exclusively from the
interest of the particular sector.
The adverse impact on other sectors in the process is never ever weighed or
acknowledged.
So to tame the teacher who is an LIC agent, tutor, politician, matka bookie,
introduce full day classes.
The crooked will always find loop holes to escape.
But in the process the city roads will be clogged with school buses and
vehicles of office-goers.
The commuters who travel in already crowded public transport will be thrown
into a further difficulty with the school crowd and office going crowd
converging at the bus stop at the same time.
Then the same mess will repeat after school hours. When will children living
in far flung areas reach home? Some teachers travel from Pernem to Margao or
vice versa. What will happen to them? Is teaching a joke? Teachers bring
home exam answer papers for corrections. Are those hours counted?
Very often female teachers have to manage home and work. What happens to
them? In the same breath we talk of women empowerment.
What happens to hundreds of students who get trained in various other skills
which are not imparted in their schools?
Has anyone considered the increased burden on electricity and water
consumption?
Have all these aspects been considered?
Modern day parents will only be too happy as full day school only helps keep
their children at
bay for some more time. But how will this improve education.
or, will it be like jumping from the frying pan into the fire?
-Soter
colaco1 at gmail.com (J. Colaco )
2011-03-04 13:53:07 UTC
Permalink
Well said, SOTER!!

BTW: The said Act is not an "administrative act" that was enacted by
any Department or "passed by any Sibal". It was enacted (passed) by
Parliament.

jc

Tony wrote: Please refer to the Central Right to Education Act with
regard to the number of school working hours. When Kapil Sibal passed
the act,
Post by Tony de Sa
To sweepingly imply or suggest that the community of *academicians* is
asleep is a bit drastic to say the very least. Please refer to the Central
Right to Education Act with regard to the number of school working hours.
When Kapil Sibal passed the act, the country welcomed it as an act that
would "boost" the standards of Education in the country.
Remember age old wisdom that says "nothing comes for nothing." There's
always a price to pay! So stop squealing. If you are a parent and you want
the thing stopped or implemented slowly till infrastructure is built up, try
having a PTA meeting and voicing your dissent. If you are a teacher, bang
goes your tuition business (with due apologies to those who do not indulge
in the business) Teacher-cum-LIC/ Bajaj Alianz/ Ing Vaisya/ other insurance
agent? Bad luck ole boy.
Be realistic and philosophical. Remember what cannot be changed must be
endured.
Eradicate one evil and create ten? Is it this that Tony is advocating.
The problem in this country is that everyone looks at particular issues with
blinkers.
The concerned ministry will take policy decisions exclusively from the
interest of the particular sector.
The adverse impact on other sectors in the process is never ever weighed or
acknowledged.
So to tame the teacher who is an LIC agent, tutor, politician, matka bookie,
introduce full day classes.
The crooked will always find loop holes to escape.
But in the process the city roads will be clogged with school buses and
vehicles of office-goers.
The commuters who travel in already crowded public transport will be thrown
into a further difficulty with the school crowd and office going crowd
converging at the bus stop at the same time.
Then the same mess will repeat after school hours. When will children living
in far flung areas reach home? Some teachers travel from Pernem to Margao or
vice versa. What will happen to them? Is teaching a joke? Teachers bring
home exam answer papers for corrections. Are those hours counted?
Very often female teachers have to manage home and work. What happens to
them? In the same breath we talk of women empowerment.
What happens to hundreds of students who get trained in various other skills
which are not imparted in their schools?
Has anyone considered the increased burden on electricity and water
consumption?
Have all these aspects been considered?
Modern day parents will only be too happy as full day school only helps keep
their children at
bay for some more time. But how will this improve education.
or, will it be like jumping from the frying pan into the fire?
-Soter
Tony de Sa
2011-03-04 17:40:18 UTC
Permalink
@ Soter :
I was merely explaining why increased hours of schooling are sought to be
implemented.
The additional hours of work are supposed to be for teachers to remain in
the school premis