Discussion:
[Goanet]Portuguese Nationality: Dream or Nightmare?
Constantino Xavier
2004-02-15 14:13:07 UTC
Permalink
I promised myself not to write on this issue on this Goanet forum, but now I
feel forced to, after I read the low-profile and inaccurate article
published in todays edition of HERALD (15/2/2004), by M?rio de Queiroz:
?Crime ring sell fake Portuguese passports?.

This article is nothing else than a rewriting of Ana Cristina Pereira's
investigation published last Monday, in Portugal's main serious daily paper
"Publico" with the title "Nacionalidade Portuguesa Tornou-se Neg?cio
Lucrativo no Antigo Estado da ?ndia" (Portuguese Nationality turns into a
lucrative business in Former Portuguese India).

On the same day I had written a letter to the journalist and to the director
of the publication (Jos? Manuel Fernandes) commenting on the mistakes and
imprecisive information it gave (example: Goa is referred to as a city). I
later discussed this issue personnally with the journalist and she was keen
in having more information, which I forwarded. Also, Jorge de Abreu Noronha,
wrote a comment on the issue, which was published in a "Portuguese
Nationality Special" on my website http://www.supergoa.com

Now, it's extraordinary to see how Mario de Queiroz has rewritten the
article, even though citing once his source, and how other mistakes and
"Among the bearers of adulterated Portuguese passports -- which differ
from fake ones in that the document is authentic although the information
it contains is not -- are alleged Indian terrorists Abu Salem and Masood
Azad, who were captured in Lisbon in 2002. Neither had any family
relations in
the former PSI."
COMMENT: This is totally unproven. These alleged terrorists have most
probably acquired portuguese nationality through other ways: thousands of
portuguese passports were stolen inbetween 1995 and 2000 from several
portuguese embassies around the world, including Pakistan.
"Portuguese is the mother tongue of 90 percent of Indians living in
Portugal."
COMMENT: Portuguese is SPOKEN by 90% of the Indians living in Portugal, but
it's not their MOTHER TONGUE (wrong translation from the original article)
"But only half are Catholic -- the main faith professed by the 20 million
inhabitants of Portugal's former possessions in India."
COMMENT: Portuguese former possessions in India have a total population of
20 million??? Main faith is Catholicism??? Oh my God...

This is one of the problems of this passport issue: Wrong information leads
to wrong and biased perceptions and opinions.

I have written a short article on this, which appeared on yesterday's
on-line edition of GOAN OBSERVER:
http://www.rajannarayan.com/global_goan.htm


Regards
Constantino H Xavier

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Colaco-Dias, Paulo R
2004-02-15 22:51:08 UTC
Permalink
Dear Constantino
*********************
Regarding:
PORTUGAL-INDIA:Crime Rings Sell Fake Portuguese Passports
By Mario de Queiroz on 12/02/2004 23:23:02 GMT
http://www.ips.org/
LISBON, Feb 12 (IPS) - A Portuguese official thought he was seeing things **********************

Indeed this is a typical example of an inaccurate article allowed to be published. It says a lot about this publication IPS - Inter Press Service!
How this article was published without any sort of factual validation, only God knows... Was it published in "Herald" in Goa as well????????

Who is this Mario de Queiroz? His translation and interpretation of the original article from the Portuguese daily Publico is so bad that I am completely speechless. I have never ever witnessed something like this.
It contains several serious misunderstandings. I think they were probably unintentional but, nevertheless, truly unbelievable.

Mario de Queiroz not only translated facts wrongly, he also added his own completely wrong interpretation of the original article, which I find extremely serious, especially because he assumed too much and too wrongly!

The original article can be found at:
http://jornal.publico.pt/2004/02/09/Sociedade/S01.html

Gross misinterpretations in addition to Constantino's list:
===========================================================

a. The word "Deputado" for Narana Coisoro' was translated to DEPUTY!!! How ridiculous can that be?

b. 11,221 processes are not under investigation, like Queiroz wrongly interpreted, but instead are pending confirmation, which is different. Nowhere it is stated that these 11,221 are under investigation.

c. Based on what can Queiroz assume Teresa Colaco was a lawyer for the former EIP (Estado da India Portuguesa)???? Another wrong interpretation/translation and this one a very serious one. It makes my first cousin Teresa Colaco an old lawyer and I do not think she appreciated that! Yes, she is a lawyer but not a lawyer from the former EIP as she is too young for that and it is absurd that Queiroz could have possibly assumed that! From where did he get that information??

d. Portugal long colonial history in India begun in 1510, not 1498!

e. 20 million inhabitants of Portugal's former possessions in India? Did Queiroz include Bombay???? I think he did! And even so, I do not think Bombay had so many people in 1642, when it was given to the English as dowry to Charles II when he married the Portuguese princess Catarina de Braganca. It can only be another ridiculous gross mistake!

And this was actually published? Would you even remotely believe????
What a good laugh! And what a bad reputation for IPS! No wonder I never heard of it!

Best regards,
Paulo Colaco Dias.


-----Original Message-----
From: goanet-admin at goanet.org [mailto:goanet-admin at goanet.org] On Behalf Of Constantino Xavier
Sent: 15 February 2004 14:13
To: goanet at goanet.org
Subject: [Goanet]Portuguese Nationality: Dream or Nightmare?

I promised myself not to write on this issue on this Goanet forum, but now I
feel forced to, after I read the low-profile and inaccurate article
published in todays edition of HERALD (15/2/2004), by M?rio de Queiroz:
"Crime ring sell fake Portuguese passports".

This article is nothing else than a rewriting of Ana Cristina Pereira's
investigation published last Monday, in Portugal's main serious daily paper
"Publico" with the title "Nacionalidade Portuguesa Tornou-se Neg?cio
Lucrativo no Antigo Estado da ?ndia" (Portuguese Nationality turns into a
lucrative business in Former Portuguese India).

On the same day I had written a letter to the journalist and to the director
of the publication (Jos? Manuel Fernandes) commenting on the mistakes and
imprecisive information it gave (example: Goa is referred to as a city). I
later discussed this issue personnally with the journalist and she was keen
in having more information, which I forwarded. Also, Jorge de Abreu Noronha,
wrote a comment on the issue, which was published in a "Portuguese
Nationality Special" on my website http://www.supergoa.com

Now, it's extraordinary to see how Mario de Queiroz has rewritten the
article, even though citing once his source, and how other mistakes and
"Among the bearers of adulterated Portuguese passports -- which differ
from fake ones in that the document is authentic although the
information it contains is not -- are alleged Indian terrorists Abu
Salem and Masood Azad, who were captured in Lisbon in 2002. Neither
had any family relations in
the former PSI."
COMMENT: This is totally unproven. These alleged terrorists have most probably acquired portuguese nationality through other ways: thousands of portuguese passports were stolen inbetween 1995 and 2000 from several portuguese embassies around the world, including Pakistan.
"Portuguese is the mother tongue of 90 percent of Indians living in
Portugal."
COMMENT: Portuguese is SPOKEN by 90% of the Indians living in Portugal, but it's not their MOTHER TONGUE (wrong translation from the original article)
"But only half are Catholic -- the main faith professed by the 20
million inhabitants of Portugal's former possessions in India."
COMMENT: Portuguese former possessions in India have a total population of 20 million??? Main faith is Catholicism??? Oh my God...

This is one of the problems of this passport issue: Wrong information leads to wrong and biased perceptions and opinions.

I have written a short article on this, which appeared on yesterday's on-line edition of GOAN OBSERVER:
http://www.rajannarayan.com/global_goan.htm

Regards
Constantino H Xavier
Frederick Noronha (FN)
2004-02-16 23:33:35 UTC
Permalink
Looks like any criticism of Portugal -- however oblique -- is taken
seriously, too seriously, by some on this fora.

I am not surprised that Paulo has not heard of the Inter Press Service,
but his lack of knowledge doesn't in itself reflect on the news service.
It would perhaps be an educative experience to look at the rationale with
which this Rome-headquartered news-agency was set up, how it is different
from the mainstream Western agencies, etc.

As a journalist working out of the Third World (this term doesn't have
negative connotations here, unlike what some believe that Third World =
Third Rate...) the perspective of IPS and the stories it carried,
together with the background in explanation, made a lot of sense to me.
No wonder that when on scholarship in West Berlin in 1990, the
teleprinter-photocopied blurred pages of IPS which the Internationales
Institut fur Journalismus then at BudapesterstraBe would be the first one
would look at, in prefernce to the other Euro and British publications
the institute subscribed to.

Having said that, there are obvious errors in the report, as pointed out.
The process of editing international stories for international audiences,
is fraught with errors, given that international editors don't quite
understand the reality of all diverse cultures. This happens to us even
when our stories get edited 600 or 2000 kms away, well within India.
Earlier today, some of my colleagues were complaining how some of their
stories were edited in a way they didn't intend to write.

I'm just trying to put the issue in context...

Mario de Queiroz's and Ana Cristina Pereira's articles raise some
interesting issues. Instead of tripping up over the smaller issues, could we
look at whether:

(i) Portuguese passports can really be "sold"?

(ii) Such passports have be sold also the "organised crime rings"?

(iii) The passports are then resold by mafias?

(iv) Some such passports have reached Pakistanis, Sri Lankans, Bangladeshis?

(v) Narana Coissoro has been rightly quoted saying that the crime ring sells
these documents for "between 1,240 and 1,860 dollars".

(vi) Portuguese authorities admit that the "racket continues"

(vii) The official view is that "sales of Portuguese nationality have become
a lucrative business" for crime rings.

(viii) Since Portugual joined the EU, applications have soared.

(ix) Of late, an increasing number of "usurpation of identity" have begun.

(x) The Portuguese police estimate that 15,000 people from India have
applied for Portuguese citizenship since 1994, and less than half did so on
the basis of genuine documents.

(xi) That the current law ''assumes that at that time, the citizens of Goa,
Diu and Daman were forced to adopt Indian nationality, and because of that,
they are still offered today the possibility of recuperating their old
Portuguese nationality, a right that extends three generations.''

(xii) "The authorities are beginning to look with mistrust at all people who
look Indian, even though the great majority are Portuguese, as I am," as
stated by Joao Fernandes, a businessman and key figure in the community of
immigrants from Diu.

FN
Post by Colaco-Dias, Paulo R
Dear Constantino
*********************
PORTUGAL-INDIA:Crime Rings Sell Fake Portuguese Passports
By Mario de Queiroz on 12/02/2004 23:23:02 GMT
http://www.ips.org/
LISBON, Feb 12 (IPS) - A Portuguese official thought he was seeing things **********************
Indeed this is a typical example of an inaccurate article allowed to be published. It says a lot about this publication IPS - Inter Press Service!
How this article was published without any sort of factual validation, only God knows... Was it published in "Herald" in Goa as well????????
Frederick Noronha (FN)
2004-02-16 23:33:35 UTC
Permalink
Looks like any criticism of Portugal -- however oblique -- is taken
seriously, too seriously, by some on this fora.

I am not surprised that Paulo has not heard of the Inter Press Service,
but his lack of knowledge doesn't in itself reflect on the news service.
It would perhaps be an educative experience to look at the rationale with
which this Rome-headquartered news-agency was set up, how it is different
from the mainstream Western agencies, etc.

As a journalist working out of the Third World (this term doesn't have
negative connotations here, unlike what some believe that Third World =
Third Rate...) the perspective of IPS and the stories it carried,
together with the background in explanation, made a lot of sense to me.
No wonder that when on scholarship in West Berlin in 1990, the
teleprinter-photocopied blurred pages of IPS which the Internationales
Institut fur Journalismus then at BudapesterstraBe would be the first one
would look at, in prefernce to the other Euro and British publications
the institute subscribed to.

Having said that, there are obvious errors in the report, as pointed out.
The process of editing international stories for international audiences,
is fraught with errors, given that international editors don't quite
understand the reality of all diverse cultures. This happens to us even
when our stories get edited 600 or 2000 kms away, well within India.
Earlier today, some of my colleagues were complaining how some of their
stories were edited in a way they didn't intend to write.

I'm just trying to put the issue in context...

Mario de Queiroz's and Ana Cristina Pereira's articles raise some
interesting issues. Instead of tripping up over the smaller issues, could we
look at whether:

(i) Portuguese passports can really be "sold"?

(ii) Such passports have be sold also the "organised crime rings"?

(iii) The passports are then resold by mafias?

(iv) Some such passports have reached Pakistanis, Sri Lankans, Bangladeshis?

(v) Narana Coissoro has been rightly quoted saying that the crime ring sells
these documents for "between 1,240 and 1,860 dollars".

(vi) Portuguese authorities admit that the "racket continues"

(vii) The official view is that "sales of Portuguese nationality have become
a lucrative business" for crime rings.

(viii) Since Portugual joined the EU, applications have soared.

(ix) Of late, an increasing number of "usurpation of identity" have begun.

(x) The Portuguese police estimate that 15,000 people from India have
applied for Portuguese citizenship since 1994, and less than half did so on
the basis of genuine documents.

(xi) That the current law ''assumes that at that time, the citizens of Goa,
Diu and Daman were forced to adopt Indian nationality, and because of that,
they are still offered today the possibility of recuperating their old
Portuguese nationality, a right that extends three generations.''

(xii) "The authorities are beginning to look with mistrust at all people who
look Indian, even though the great majority are Portuguese, as I am," as
stated by Joao Fernandes, a businessman and key figure in the community of
immigrants from Diu.

FN
Post by Colaco-Dias, Paulo R
Dear Constantino
*********************
PORTUGAL-INDIA:Crime Rings Sell Fake Portuguese Passports
By Mario de Queiroz on 12/02/2004 23:23:02 GMT
http://www.ips.org/
LISBON, Feb 12 (IPS) - A Portuguese official thought he was seeing things **********************
Indeed this is a typical example of an inaccurate article allowed to be published. It says a lot about this publication IPS - Inter Press Service!
How this article was published without any sort of factual validation, only God knows... Was it published in "Herald" in Goa as well????????
Frederick Noronha (FN)
2004-02-16 23:33:35 UTC
Permalink
Looks like any criticism of Portugal -- however oblique -- is taken
seriously, too seriously, by some on this fora.

I am not surprised that Paulo has not heard of the Inter Press Service,
but his lack of knowledge doesn't in itself reflect on the news service.
It would perhaps be an educative experience to look at the rationale with
which this Rome-headquartered news-agency was set up, how it is different
from the mainstream Western agencies, etc.

As a journalist working out of the Third World (this term doesn't have
negative connotations here, unlike what some believe that Third World =
Third Rate...) the perspective of IPS and the stories it carried,
together with the background in explanation, made a lot of sense to me.
No wonder that when on scholarship in West Berlin in 1990, the
teleprinter-photocopied blurred pages of IPS which the Internationales
Institut fur Journalismus then at BudapesterstraBe would be the first one
would look at, in prefernce to the other Euro and British publications
the institute subscribed to.

Having said that, there are obvious errors in the report, as pointed out.
The process of editing international stories for international audiences,
is fraught with errors, given that international editors don't quite
understand the reality of all diverse cultures. This happens to us even
when our stories get edited 600 or 2000 kms away, well within India.
Earlier today, some of my colleagues were complaining how some of their
stories were edited in a way they didn't intend to write.

I'm just trying to put the issue in context...

Mario de Queiroz's and Ana Cristina Pereira's articles raise some
interesting issues. Instead of tripping up over the smaller issues, could we
look at whether:

(i) Portuguese passports can really be "sold"?

(ii) Such passports have be sold also the "organised crime rings"?

(iii) The passports are then resold by mafias?

(iv) Some such passports have reached Pakistanis, Sri Lankans, Bangladeshis?

(v) Narana Coissoro has been rightly quoted saying that the crime ring sells
these documents for "between 1,240 and 1,860 dollars".

(vi) Portuguese authorities admit that the "racket continues"

(vii) The official view is that "sales of Portuguese nationality have become
a lucrative business" for crime rings.

(viii) Since Portugual joined the EU, applications have soared.

(ix) Of late, an increasing number of "usurpation of identity" have begun.

(x) The Portuguese police estimate that 15,000 people from India have
applied for Portuguese citizenship since 1994, and less than half did so on
the basis of genuine documents.

(xi) That the current law ''assumes that at that time, the citizens of Goa,
Diu and Daman were forced to adopt Indian nationality, and because of that,
they are still offered today the possibility of recuperating their old
Portuguese nationality, a right that extends three generations.''

(xii) "The authorities are beginning to look with mistrust at all people who
look Indian, even though the great majority are Portuguese, as I am," as
stated by Joao Fernandes, a businessman and key figure in the community of
immigrants from Diu.

FN
Post by Colaco-Dias, Paulo R
Dear Constantino
*********************
PORTUGAL-INDIA:Crime Rings Sell Fake Portuguese Passports
By Mario de Queiroz on 12/02/2004 23:23:02 GMT
http://www.ips.org/
LISBON, Feb 12 (IPS) - A Portuguese official thought he was seeing things **********************
Indeed this is a typical example of an inaccurate article allowed to be published. It says a lot about this publication IPS - Inter Press Service!
How this article was published without any sort of factual validation, only God knows... Was it published in "Herald" in Goa as well????????
Frederick Noronha (FN)
2004-02-16 23:33:35 UTC
Permalink
Looks like any criticism of Portugal -- however oblique -- is taken
seriously, too seriously, by some on this fora.

I am not surprised that Paulo has not heard of the Inter Press Service,
but his lack of knowledge doesn't in itself reflect on the news service.
It would perhaps be an educative experience to look at the rationale with
which this Rome-headquartered news-agency was set up, how it is different
from the mainstream Western agencies, etc.

As a journalist working out of the Third World (this term doesn't have
negative connotations here, unlike what some believe that Third World =
Third Rate...) the perspective of IPS and the stories it carried,
together with the background in explanation, made a lot of sense to me.
No wonder that when on scholarship in West Berlin in 1990, the
teleprinter-photocopied blurred pages of IPS which the Internationales
Institut fur Journalismus then at BudapesterstraBe would be the first one
would look at, in prefernce to the other Euro and British publications
the institute subscribed to.

Having said that, there are obvious errors in the report, as pointed out.
The process of editing international stories for international audiences,
is fraught with errors, given that international editors don't quite
understand the reality of all diverse cultures. This happens to us even
when our stories get edited 600 or 2000 kms away, well within India.
Earlier today, some of my colleagues were complaining how some of their
stories were edited in a way they didn't intend to write.

I'm just trying to put the issue in context...

Mario de Queiroz's and Ana Cristina Pereira's articles raise some
interesting issues. Instead of tripping up over the smaller issues, could we
look at whether:

(i) Portuguese passports can really be "sold"?

(ii) Such passports have be sold also the "organised crime rings"?

(iii) The passports are then resold by mafias?

(iv) Some such passports have reached Pakistanis, Sri Lankans, Bangladeshis?

(v) Narana Coissoro has been rightly quoted saying that the crime ring sells
these documents for "between 1,240 and 1,860 dollars".

(vi) Portuguese authorities admit that the "racket continues"

(vii) The official view is that "sales of Portuguese nationality have become
a lucrative business" for crime rings.

(viii) Since Portugual joined the EU, applications have soared.

(ix) Of late, an increasing number of "usurpation of identity" have begun.

(x) The Portuguese police estimate that 15,000 people from India have
applied for Portuguese citizenship since 1994, and less than half did so on
the basis of genuine documents.

(xi) That the current law ''assumes that at that time, the citizens of Goa,
Diu and Daman were forced to adopt Indian nationality, and because of that,
they are still offered today the possibility of recuperating their old
Portuguese nationality, a right that extends three generations.''

(xii) "The authorities are beginning to look with mistrust at all people who
look Indian, even though the great majority are Portuguese, as I am," as
stated by Joao Fernandes, a businessman and key figure in the community of
immigrants from Diu.

FN
Post by Colaco-Dias, Paulo R
Dear Constantino
*********************
PORTUGAL-INDIA:Crime Rings Sell Fake Portuguese Passports
By Mario de Queiroz on 12/02/2004 23:23:02 GMT
http://www.ips.org/
LISBON, Feb 12 (IPS) - A Portuguese official thought he was seeing things **********************
Indeed this is a typical example of an inaccurate article allowed to be published. It says a lot about this publication IPS - Inter Press Service!
How this article was published without any sort of factual validation, only God knows... Was it published in "Herald" in Goa as well????????
Frederick Noronha (FN)
2004-02-16 23:33:35 UTC