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NEWS: Kerala Christians protest new education bill
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Goanet News
2006-07-23 17:03:29 UTC
Permalink
Kerala Christians protest new education bill
Indo-Asian News Service


Thiruvananthapuram, July 23 (IANS) Most churches in Kerala held special
prayers Sunday to protest a new education bill that they claim violates
the fundamental rights of religious minorities.

A two-page letter signed by the supreme heads of six different sects of
Christians was also read out, condemning the law as well as Wednesday's
violence unleashed by activists of the Students Federation of India
(SFI), student wing of the Communist Party of India-Marxist, who caused
extensive damage to several professional colleges run by Christian
managements in the state.

The letter was signed by the heads of the Catholic (Syro Malabar and
Malankara) Orthodox, Church of South India and Jacobite churches.

The churches feel that the new law - Kerala Professional Colleges
(Prohibition of Capitation Fee, Regulation of Admission, Fixation of
Non-Exploitative Fee and Other Measures to Ensure Equity and Excellence
in Professional Education) Act -violates the fundamental rights of
religious minorities guaranteed under article 30(1) of the
constitution.

"The constitution is very clear about the minority status and we will
have it as long as the country exists. Now the government is trying to
threaten us through this law," read the letter.

The violence was unleashed by the SFI in the wake of an interim order on
Tuesday that allowed all self-financing professional colleges to follow
last year's norms on admissions and fee structure.

The interim order was a setback to the Kerala government, which had
passed the law earlier this month.

The churches feel cheated by the CPI-M, which, they say after taking
their support in the recent assembly polls has now left them high and
dry.

The CPI-M top brass has chided the SFI leadership for Wednesday's attack
and asked them to refrain from any more violence.

Veliyam Bharghavan, state secretary of the Communist Party of India, on
Sunday condemned the attack on colleges by the SFI.

Meanwhile, state Education Minister M.A. Baby, talking to reporters at
Kozhikode, said he hoped that Christian religious leaders would restrain
those from the community who were running educational institution with a
commercial attitude.

"I hope these leaders would pray and correct those faithful who are
running these institutions, which should be a social obligation and not
for commercial needs," said Baby.

Christians account for 22 percent of Kerala's 32-million population, and
have been in the forefront of shaping the educational sector in the
state.

The new law, being protested by the managements of the private colleges,
has done away with the freedom of college managements to decide on
allocation of 50 percent of the seats. The seats in the general merit
category have also been restricted to 18 percent.
Goanet News
2006-07-23 17:03:29 UTC
Permalink
Kerala Christians protest new education bill
Indo-Asian News Service


Thiruvananthapuram, July 23 (IANS) Most churches in Kerala held special
prayers Sunday to protest a new education bill that they claim violates
the fundamental rights of religious minorities.

A two-page letter signed by the supreme heads of six different sects of
Christians was also read out, condemning the law as well as Wednesday's
violence unleashed by activists of the Students Federation of India
(SFI), student wing of the Communist Party of India-Marxist, who caused
extensive damage to several professional colleges run by Christian
managements in the state.

The letter was signed by the heads of the Catholic (Syro Malabar and
Malankara) Orthodox, Church of South India and Jacobite churches.

The churches feel that the new law - Kerala Professional Colleges
(Prohibition of Capitation Fee, Regulation of Admission, Fixation of
Non-Exploitative Fee and Other Measures to Ensure Equity and Excellence
in Professional Education) Act -violates the fundamental rights of
religious minorities guaranteed under article 30(1) of the
constitution.

"The constitution is very clear about the minority status and we will
have it as long as the country exists. Now the government is trying to
threaten us through this law," read the letter.

The violence was unleashed by the SFI in the wake of an interim order on
Tuesday that allowed all self-financing professional colleges to follow
last year's norms on admissions and fee structure.

The interim order was a setback to the Kerala government, which had
passed the law earlier this month.

The churches feel cheated by the CPI-M, which, they say after taking
their support in the recent assembly polls has now left them high and
dry.

The CPI-M top brass has chided the SFI leadership for Wednesday's attack
and asked them to refrain from any more violence.

Veliyam Bharghavan, state secretary of the Communist Party of India, on
Sunday condemned the attack on colleges by the SFI.

Meanwhile, state Education Minister M.A. Baby, talking to reporters at
Kozhikode, said he hoped that Christian religious leaders would restrain
those from the community who were running educational institution with a
commercial attitude.

"I hope these leaders would pray and correct those faithful who are
running these institutions, which should be a social obligation and not
for commercial needs," said Baby.

Christians account for 22 percent of Kerala's 32-million population, and
have been in the forefront of shaping the educational sector in the
state.

The new law, being protested by the managements of the private colleges,
has done away with the freedom of college managements to decide on
allocation of 50 percent of the seats. The seats in the general merit
category have also been restricted to 18 percent.
Goanet News
2006-07-23 17:03:29 UTC
Permalink
Kerala Christians protest new education bill
Indo-Asian News Service


Thiruvananthapuram, July 23 (IANS) Most churches in Kerala held special
prayers Sunday to protest a new education bill that they claim violates
the fundamental rights of religious minorities.

A two-page letter signed by the supreme heads of six different sects of
Christians was also read out, condemning the law as well as Wednesday's
violence unleashed by activists of the Students Federation of India
(SFI), student wing of the Communist Party of India-Marxist, who caused
extensive damage to several professional colleges run by Christian
managements in the state.

The letter was signed by the heads of the Catholic (Syro Malabar and
Malankara) Orthodox, Church of South India and Jacobite churches.

The churches feel that the new law - Kerala Professional Colleges
(Prohibition of Capitation Fee, Regulation of Admission, Fixation of
Non-Exploitative Fee and Other Measures to Ensure Equity and Excellence
in Professional Education) Act -violates the fundamental rights of
religious minorities guaranteed under article 30(1) of the
constitution.

"The constitution is very clear about the minority status and we will
have it as long as the country exists. Now the government is trying to
threaten us through this law," read the letter.

The violence was unleashed by the SFI in the wake of an interim order on
Tuesday that allowed all self-financing professional colleges to follow
last year's norms on admissions and fee structure.

The interim order was a setback to the Kerala government, which had
passed the law earlier this month.

The churches feel cheated by the CPI-M, which, they say after taking
their support in the recent assembly polls has now left them high and
dry.

The CPI-M top brass has chided the SFI leadership for Wednesday's attack
and asked them to refrain from any more violence.

Veliyam Bharghavan, state secretary of the Communist Party of India, on
Sunday condemned the attack on colleges by the SFI.

Meanwhile, state Education Minister M.A. Baby, talking to reporters at
Kozhikode, said he hoped that Christian religious leaders would restrain
those from the community who were running educational institution with a
commercial attitude.

"I hope these leaders would pray and correct those faithful who are
running these institutions, which should be a social obligation and not
for commercial needs," said Baby.

Christians account for 22 percent of Kerala's 32-million population, and
have been in the forefront of shaping the educational sector in the
state.

The new law, being protested by the managements of the private colleges,
has done away with the freedom of college managements to decide on
allocation of 50 percent of the seats. The seats in the general merit
category have also been restricted to 18 percent.
Goanet News
2006-07-23 17:03:29 UTC
Permalink
Kerala Christians protest new education bill
Indo-Asian News Service


Thiruvananthapuram, July 23 (IANS) Most churches in Kerala held special
prayers Sunday to protest a new education bill that they claim violates
the fundamental rights of religious minorities.

A two-page letter signed by the supreme heads of six different sects of
Christians was also read out, condemning the law as well as Wednesday's
violence unleashed by activists of the Students Federation of India
(SFI), student wing of the Communist Party of India-Marxist, who caused
extensive damage to several professional colleges run by Christian
managements in the state.

The letter was signed by the heads of the Catholic (Syro Malabar and
Malankara) Orthodox, Church of South India and Jacobite churches.

The churches feel that the new law - Kerala Professional Colleges
(Prohibition of Capitation Fee, Regulation of Admission, Fixation of
Non-Exploitative Fee and Other Measures to Ensure Equity and Excellence
in Professional Education) Act -violates the fundamental rights of
religious minorities guaranteed under article 30(1) of the
constitution.

"The constitution is very clear about the minority status and we will
have it as long as the country exists. Now the government is trying to
threaten us through this law," read the letter.

The violence was unleashed by the SFI in the wake of an interim order on
Tuesday that allowed all self-financing professional colleges to follow
last year's norms on admissions and fee structure.

The interim order was a setback to the Kerala government, which had
passed the law earlier this month.

The churches feel cheated by the CPI-M, which, they say after taking
their support in the recent assembly polls has now left them high and
dry.

The CPI-M top brass has chided the SFI leadership for Wednesday's attack
and asked them to refrain from any more violence.

Veliyam Bharghavan, state secretary of the Communist Party of India, on
Sunday condemned the attack on colleges by the SFI.

Meanwhile, state Education Minister M.A. Baby, talking to reporters at
Kozhikode, said he hoped that Christian religious leaders would restrain
those from the community who were running educational institution with a
commercial attitude.

"I hope these leaders would pray and correct those faithful who are
running these institutions, which should be a social obligation and not
for commercial needs," said Baby.

Christians account for 22 percent of Kerala's 32-million population, and
have been in the forefront of shaping the educational sector in the
state.

The new law, being protested by the managements of the private colleges,
has done away with the freedom of college managements to decide on
allocation of 50 percent of the seats. The seats in the general merit
category have also been restricted to 18 percent.
Goanet News
2006-07-23 17:03:29 UTC
Permalink
Kerala Christians protest new education bill
Indo-Asian News Service


Thiruvananthapuram, July 23 (IANS) Most churches in Kerala held special
prayers Sunday to protest a new education bill that they claim violates
the fundamental rights of religious minorities.

A two-page letter signed by the supreme heads of six different sects of
Christians was also read out, condemning the law as well as Wednesday's
violence unleashed by activists of the Students Federation of India
(SFI), student wing of the Communist Party of India-Marxist, who caused
extensive damage to several professional colleges run by Christian
managements in the state.

The letter was signed by the heads of the Catholic (Syro Malabar and
Malankara) Orthodox, Church of South India and Jacobite churches.

The churches feel that the new law - Kerala Professional Colleges
(Prohibition of Capitation Fee, Regulation of Admission, Fixation of
Non-Exploitative Fee and Other Measures to Ensure Equity and Excellence
in Professional Education) Act -violates the fundamental rights of
religious minorities guaranteed under article 30(1) of the
constitution.

"The constitution is very clear about the minority status and we will
have it as long as the country exists. Now the government is trying to
threaten us through this law," read the letter.

The violence was unleashed by the SFI in the wake of an interim order on
Tuesday that allowed all self-financing professional colleges to follow
last year's norms on admissions and fee structure.

The interim order was a setback to the Kerala government, which had
passed the law earlier this month.

The churches feel cheated by the CPI-M, which, they say after taking
their support in the recent assembly polls has now left them high and
dry.

The CPI-M top brass has chided the SFI leadership for Wednesday's attack
and asked them to refrain from any more violence.

Veliyam Bharghavan, state secretary of the Communist Party of India, on
Sunday condemned the attack on colleges by the SFI.

Meanwhile, state Education Minister M.A. Baby, talking to reporters at
Kozhikode, said he hoped that Christian religious leaders would restrain
those from the community who were running educational institution with a
commercial attitude.

"I hope these leaders would pray and correct those faithful who are
running these institutions, which should be a social obligation and not
for commercial needs," said Baby.

Christians account for 22 percent of Kerala's 32-million population, and
have been in the forefront of shaping the educational sector in the
state.

The new law, being protested by the managements of the private colleges,
has done away with the freedom of college managements to decide on
allocation of 50 percent of the seats. The seats in the general merit
category have also been restricted to 18 percent.
Goanet News
2006-07-23 17:03:29 UTC
Permalink
Kerala Christians protest new education bill
Indo-Asian News Service


Thiruvananthapuram, July 23 (IANS) Most churches in Kerala held special
prayers Sunday to protest a new education bill that they claim violates
the fundamental rights of religious minorities.

A two-page letter signed by the supreme heads of six different sects of
Christians was also read out, condemning the law as well as Wednesday's
violence unleashed by activists of the Students Federation of India
(SFI), student wing of the Communist Party of India-Marxist, who caused
extensive damage to several professional colleges run by Christian
managements in the state.

The letter was signed by the heads of the Catholic (Syro Malabar and
Malankara) Orthodox, Church of South India and Jacobite churches.

The churches feel that the new law - Kerala Professional Colleges
(Prohibition of Capitation Fee, Regulation of Admission, Fixation of
Non-Exploitative Fee and Other Measures to Ensure Equity and Excellence
in Professional Education) Act -violates the fundamental rights of
religious minorities guaranteed under article 30(1) of the
constitution.

"The constitution is very clear about the minority status and we will
have it as long as the country exists. Now the government is trying to
threaten us through this law," read the letter.

The violence was unleashed by the SFI in the wake of an interim order on
Tuesday that allowed all self-financing professional colleges to follow
last year's norms on admissions and fee structure.

The interim order was a setback to the Kerala government, which had
passed the law earlier this month.

The churches feel cheated by the CPI-M, which, they say after taking
their support in the recent assembly polls has now left them high and
dry.

The CPI-M top brass has chided the SFI leadership for Wednesday's attack
and asked them to refrain from any more violence.

Veliyam Bharghavan, state secretary of the Communist Party of India, on
Sunday condemned the attack on colleges by the SFI.

Meanwhile, state Education Minister M.A. Baby, talking to reporters at
Kozhikode, said he hoped that Christian religious leaders would restrain
those from the community who were running educational institution with a
commercial attitude.

"I hope these leaders would pray and correct those faithful who are
running these institutions, which should be a social obligation and not
for commercial needs," said Baby.

Christians account for 22 percent of Kerala's 32-million population, and
have been in the forefront of shaping the educational sector in the
state.

The new law, being protested by the managements of the private colleges,
has done away with the freedom of college managements to decide on
allocation of 50 percent of the seats. The seats in the general merit
category have also been restricted to 18 percent.
Goanet News
2006-07-23 17:03:29 UTC
Permalink
Kerala Christians protest new education bill
Indo-Asian News Service


Thiruvananthapuram, July 23 (IANS) Most churches in Kerala held special
prayers Sunday to protest a new education bill that they claim violates
the fundamental rights of religious minorities.

A two-page letter signed by the supreme heads of six different sects of
Christians was also read out, condemning the law as well as Wednesday's
violence unleashed by activists of the Students Federation of India
(SFI), student wing of the Communist Party of India-Marxist, who caused
extensive damage to several professional colleges run by Christian
managements in the state.

The letter was signed by the heads of the Catholic (Syro Malabar and
Malankara) Orthodox, Church of South India and Jacobite churches.

The churches feel that the new law - Kerala Professional Colleges
(Prohibition of Capitation Fee, Regulation of Admission, Fixation of
Non-Exploitative Fee and Other Measures to Ensure Equity and Excellence
in Professional Education) Act -violates the fundamental rights of
religious minorities guaranteed under article 30(1) of the
constitution.

"The constitution is very clear about the minority status and we will
have it as long as the country exists. Now the government is trying to
threaten us through this law," read the letter.

The violence was unleashed by the SFI in the wake of an interim order on
Tuesday that allowed all self-financing professional colleges to follow
last year's norms on admissions and fee structure.

The interim order was a setback to the Kerala government, which had
passed the law earlier this month.

The churches feel cheated by the CPI-M, which, they say after taking
their support in the recent assembly polls has now left them high and
dry.

The CPI-M top brass has chided the SFI leadership for Wednesday's attack
and asked them to refrain from any more violence.

Veliyam Bharghavan, state secretary of the Communist Party of India, on
Sunday condemned the attack on colleges by the SFI.

Meanwhile, state Education Minister M.A. Baby, talking to reporters at
Kozhikode, said he hoped that Christian religious leaders would restrain
those from the community who were running educational institution with a
commercial attitude.

"I hope these leaders would pray and correct those faithful who are
running these institutions, which should be a social obligation and not
for commercial needs," said Baby.

Christians account for 22 percent of Kerala's 32-million population, and
have been in the forefront of shaping the educational sector in the
state.

The new law, being protested by the managements of the private colleges,
has done away with the freedom of college managements to decide on
allocation of 50 percent of the seats. The seats in the general merit
category have also been restricted to 18 percent.

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