Discussion:
British grandmother seriously ill with rabies was sent home THREE times by her GP and A&E department before she was diagnosed
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Gabe Menezes
2012-05-24 08:16:16 UTC
Permalink
British grandmother seriously ill with rabies was sent home THREE times by
her GP and A&E department before she was diagnosed

- The woman, in her 50s, was bitten by a puppy while on holiday in India
with her husband
- She went to her GP once and the A&E department of Darent Valley
Hospital twice over four days but was sent home each time
- Victim returned to her doctor last Friday and was sent to hospital
with suspected rabies
- A total of 20 people have now been vaccinated against the illness,
including six relatives of the woman, hospital medics and at least one
doctor

By SOPHIE BORLAND<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/search.html?s=&authornamef=Sophie+Borland>
and ANTHONY BOND<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/search.html?s=&authornamef=Anthony+Bond+>

*PUBLISHED:* 20:23, 23 May 2012 | *UPDATED:* 08:43, 24 May 2012

- Comments (126)<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2148915/British-grandmother-seriously-ill-rabies-sent-home-THREE-times-GP-A-amp-E-department-diagnosed.html#comments>
- Share<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2148915/British-grandmother-seriously-ill-rabies-sent-home-THREE-times-GP-A-amp-E-department-diagnosed.html#socialLinks>
-
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-
-


[image: Seriously ill: A British patient is fighting for their life in
hospital after being bitten by a rabid dog while on holiday in India (file
picture)]

Seriously ill: A British patient is fighting for their life in hospital
after being bitten by a rabid dog while on holiday in India (file picture)

A British grandmother who is seriously ill with rabies was sent home three
times by her GP and a hospital before her illness was diagnosed.

The victim, in her 50s, was bitten by a puppy while on holiday in India
with her husband.

She contracted the illness two months ago but only developed symptoms
within the last fortnight.

According to The Sun, the woman, who lives in London, went to her GP once
and the A&E department of Darent Valley Hospital in Dartford, Kent, twice
over four days.

However, each time she was sent home.

The paper reports that it was only when she returned to her doctor last
Friday that she was sent to hospital and suspected to have rabies.

The victim, who is believed to be of Indian ethnic origin, is being treated
in an isolation room at University College Hospital, London.

Her husband was with her when she was bitten by the dog.

It is believed that 20 people have been vaccinated against the illness,
including six relatives of the woman, hospital medics and at least one
doctor.

It is the first case of rabies in England in almost seven years.

The last occurred in July 2005 when a woman from Manchester died after
contracting it from a dog bite during a holiday in the Indian resort of Goa.

Officials at the Health Protection Agency have stressed that there is no
risk the illness will have been passed on to the general public.


More...

- One in 12 babies pick up dangerous new infections in
hospital<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2148689/One-15-patients-catch-new-infection-hospital.html>
- Meningitis girl, 5, given hours to live recovers to become child
model<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2148799/Meningitis-girl-5-given-hours-live-recovers-child-model.html>

Although the patient has had the virus in Britain for several weeks, it is
only since they became unwell that they risked passing it on.

In theory, the illness can be transmitted by kissing, sex and organ
transplants.
[image: Specialist treatment: The patient is in an isolation room at
University College Hospital, London (above) after developing symptoms
within the last fortnight]

Specialist treatment: The patient is in an isolation room at University
College Hospital, London (above) after developing symptoms within the last
fortnight

Doctors have warned that the chances of a rabies victim surviving are
extremely slim, as once symptoms develop it is nearly always fatal.

It is caused by a virus which spreads through the bloodstream to the brain
and spinal cord.

It can take between four days and 12 weeks to spread, so if patients are
vaccinated in time they can be treated.Early symptoms of rabies include
fever, insomnia, anxiety and sickness.

Dr Brian McCloskey, director of the Health Protection Agency for London,
said: ?It is important to stress that there is no risk to the general
public as a result of this case or to patients and visitors at the hospital
where the patient is receiving treatment.
[image: Deadly: The grandmother's illness is the first case of rabies in
England in almost seven years. The last occurred in July 2005 when a woman
died after contracting it from a dog bite during a holiday in the Indian
resort of Goa, pictured]

Deadly: The grandmother's illness is the first case of rabies in England in
almost seven years. The last occurred in July 2005 when a woman died after
contracting it from a dog bite during a holiday in the Indian resort of
Goa, pictured
[image: Rare: Naturalist David McRae (pictured) became the first person in
Britain to die of the disease for 100 years after he was bitten on the hand
by a rabid bat in 2002]

Rare: Naturalist David McRae (pictured) became the first person in Britain
to die of the disease for 100 years after he was bitten on the hand by a
rabid bat in 2002

'Despite there being tens of thousands of rabies cases each year worldwide,
there have been no documented laboratory confirmed cases of human-to-human
spread.

?Therefore the risk to other humans or animals from a patient with rabies
is considered negligible.

?However, to take every possible precaution, family members and healthcare
staff who had close contact with the patient since they became unwell have
been assessed and offered vaccination.?

In 2002, naturalist David McRae, 56, of Guthrie, Angus, became the first
person in Britain to die of the disease for 100 years after he was bitten
on the hand by a rabid bat.
[image: Killer: Rabies viruses showing their characteristic bullet shape.
The disease has an extremely low survival rate once symptoms have developed]

Killer: Rabies viruses showing their characteristic bullet shape. The
disease has an extremely low survival rate once symptoms have developed
[image: Vaccination programme: Although all but eradicated in the UK rabies
is still common in developing countries]

Vaccination programme: Although all but eradicated in the UK rabies is
still common in developing countries

There have only been three other cases in the UK since 2000. The last time
a Briton caught rabies from a dog in this country, rather than abroad, was
1902.

Rabies is caused by a virus which spreads through the bloodstream to the
brain and spinal cord. It can take between four days and 12 weeks to
spread, so if patients are vaccinated in time they can be treated.

Last night a spokesman from UCLH said: ?The Hospital for Tropical Diseases
is currently looking after a British patient diagnosed with rabies
following a trip abroad. The patient is in a serious condition.

?We would like to reassure our patients, visitors and staff that there is
no risk to them as a result of this case.?

It is believed the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs is
also involved in the case because on of the woman's two cats has recently
been to a vet. However, it is unclear why it needed to see the vet.

The Health Protection Agency has also been notified.


Read more:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2148915/British-grandmother-seriously-ill-rabies-sent-home-THREE-times-GP-A-amp-E-department-diagnosed.html#ixzz1vlz2wwqG
--
DEV BOREM KORUM

Gabe Menezes.
Gabriel de Figueiredo
2012-05-24 13:43:36 UTC
Permalink
Its high time all stray dogs in Goa were caught and put on trucks to New Delhi, right to Maneka's door :-0.??
?
Seriously, who is really looking after these strays? They fight at night and often the bloodied animals are seen in doorways of people in the morning. I know of people who fearfully get out of their houses in the morning not knowing if the injured dogs are rabid or not. The son of a good friend of mine was bitten last?June by that mad dog that went on a rampage from the?Panjim Bus stand to almost St. Inez, so it not something uncommon.
?
Dog lovers, if any on this?forum I apologise, but I think it is high time the shooters were brought out and stray dogs culled; if any of you object to this suggestion, please gather all the strays and contain them inside your house/yard.??
?
Gabriel
________________________________
From: Gabe Menezes <gabe.menezes at gmail.com>
To: "Goa's premiere mailing list, estb. 1994!" <goanet at lists.goanet.org>
Sent: Thursday, 24 May 2012 6:16 PM
Subject: [Goanet] British grandmother seriously ill with rabies was sent home THREE times by her GP and A&E department before she was diagnosed
The last occurred in July 2005 when a woman from Manchester died after
contracting it from a dog bite during a holiday in the Indian resort of Goa.
Jose Colaco
2012-05-25 10:24:08 UTC
Permalink
Mogal Gabriel,

Also important: One should avoid stray dogs and dogs not known to you.

Sometimes, one gets these ' bleeding hearts' individuals who want to "care" for every dog they see on the road.

Still, it is fortunate that these tourists are interested ONLY in 4-legged dogs i.e. Politicians and Hacktivists need not apply.

jc

Pardon any Typos. This IPad does some curious auto- corrections
Post by Gabriel de Figueiredo
Its high time all stray dogs in Goa were caught and put on trucks to New Delhi, right to Maneka's door :-0.
Seriously, who is really looking after these strays? They fight at night and often the bloodied animals are seen in doorways of people in the morning. I know of people who fearfully get out of their houses in the morning not knowing if the injured dogs are rabid or not. The son of a good friend of mine was bitten last June by that mad dog that went on a rampage from the Panjim Bus stand to almost St. Inez, so it not something uncommon.
Dog lovers, if any on this forum I apologise, but I think it is high time the shooters were brought out and stray dogs culled; if any of you object to this suggestion, please gather all the strays and contain them inside your house/yard.
Gabriel
________________________________
From: Gabe Menezes <gabe.menezes at gmail.com>
To: "Goa's premiere mailing list, estb. 1994!" <goanet at lists.goanet.org>
Sent: Thursday, 24 May 2012 6:16 PM
Subject: [Goanet] British grandmother seriously ill with rabies was sent home THREE times by her GP and A&E department before she was diagnosed
The last occurred in July 2005 when a woman from Manchester died after
contracting it from a dog bite during a holiday in the Indian resort of Goa.
Jose Colaco
2012-05-25 10:24:08 UTC
Permalink
Mogal Gabriel,

Also important: One should avoid stray dogs and dogs not known to you.

Sometimes, one gets these ' bleeding hearts' individuals who want to "care" for every dog they see on the road.

Still, it is fortunate that these tourists are interested ONLY in 4-legged dogs i.e. Politicians and Hacktivists need not apply.

jc

Pardon any Typos. This IPad does some curious auto- corrections
Post by Gabriel de Figueiredo
Its high time all stray dogs in Goa were caught and put on trucks to New Delhi, right to Maneka's door :-0.
Seriously, who is really looking after these strays? They fight at night and often the bloodied animals are seen in doorways of people in the morning. I know of people who fearfully get out of their houses in the morning not knowing if the injured dogs are rabid or not. The son of a good friend of mine was bitten last June by that mad dog that went on a rampage from the Panjim Bus stand to almost St. Inez, so it not something uncommon.
Dog lovers, if any on this forum I apologise, but I think it is high time the shooters were brought out and stray dogs culled; if any of you object to this suggestion, please gather all the strays and contain them inside your house/yard.
Gabriel
________________________________
From: Gabe Menezes <gabe.menezes at gmail.com>
To: "Goa's premiere mailing list, estb. 1994!" <goanet at lists.goanet.org>
Sent: Thursday, 24 May 2012 6:16 PM
Subject: [Goanet] British grandmother seriously ill with rabies was sent home THREE times by her GP and A&E department before she was diagnosed
The last occurred in July 2005 when a woman from Manchester died after
contracting it from a dog bite during a holiday in the Indian resort of Goa.
Jose Colaco
2012-05-25 10:24:08 UTC
Permalink
Mogal Gabriel,

Also important: One should avoid stray dogs and dogs not known to you.

Sometimes, one gets these ' bleeding hearts' individuals who want to "care" for every dog they see on the road.

Still, it is fortunate that these tourists are interested ONLY in 4-legged dogs i.e. Politicians and Hacktivists need not apply.

jc

Pardon any Typos. This IPad does some curious auto- corrections
Post by Gabriel de Figueiredo
Its high time all stray dogs in Goa were caught and put on trucks to New Delhi, right to Maneka's door :-0.
Seriously, who is really looking after these strays? They fight at night and often the bloodied animals are seen in doorways of people in the morning. I know of people who fearfully get out of their houses in the morning not knowing if the injured dogs are rabid or not. The son of a good friend of mine was bitten last June by that mad dog that went on a rampage from the Panjim Bus stand to almost St. Inez, so it not something uncommon.
Dog lovers, if any on this forum I apologise, but I think it is high time the shooters were brought out and stray dogs culled; if any of you object to this suggestion, please gather all the strays and contain them inside your house/yard.
Gabriel
________________________________
From: Gabe Menezes <gabe.menezes at gmail.com>
To: "Goa's premiere mailing list, estb. 1994!" <goanet at lists.goanet.org>
Sent: Thursday, 24 May 2012 6:16 PM
Subject: [Goanet] British grandmother seriously ill with rabies was sent home THREE times by her GP and A&E department before she was diagnosed
The last occurred in July 2005 when a woman from Manchester died after
contracting it from a dog bite during a holiday in the Indian resort of Goa.
Jose Colaco
2012-05-25 10:24:08 UTC
Permalink
Mogal Gabriel,

Also important: One should avoid stray dogs and dogs not known to you.

Sometimes, one gets these ' bleeding hearts' individuals who want to "care" for every dog they see on the road.

Still, it is fortunate that these tourists are interested ONLY in 4-legged dogs i.e. Politicians and Hacktivists need not apply.

jc

Pardon any Typos. This IPad does some curious auto- corrections
Post by Gabriel de Figueiredo
Its high time all stray dogs in Goa were caught and put on trucks to New Delhi, right to Maneka's door :-0.
Seriously, who is really looking after these strays? They fight at night and often the bloodied animals are seen in doorways of people in the morning. I know of people who fearfully get out of their houses in the morning not knowing if the injured dogs are rabid or not. The son of a good friend of mine was bitten last June by that mad dog that went on a rampage from the Panjim Bus stand to almost St. Inez, so it not something uncommon.
Dog lovers, if any on this forum I apologise, but I think it is high time the shooters were brought out and stray dogs culled; if any of you object to this suggestion, please gather all the strays and contain them inside your house/yard.
Gabriel
________________________________
From: Gabe Menezes <gabe.menezes at gmail.com>
To: "Goa's premiere mailing list, estb. 1994!" <goanet at lists.goanet.org>
Sent: Thursday, 24 May 2012 6:16 PM
Subject: [Goanet] British grandmother seriously ill with rabies was sent home THREE times by her GP and A&E department before she was diagnosed
The last occurred in July 2005 when a woman from Manchester died after
contracting it from a dog bite during a holiday in the Indian resort of Goa.
Jose Colaco
2012-05-25 10:24:08 UTC
Permalink
Mogal Gabriel,

Also important: One should avoid stray dogs and dogs not known to you.

Sometimes, one gets these ' bleeding hearts' individuals who want to "care" for every dog they see on the road.

Still, it is fortunate that these tourists are interested ONLY in 4-legged dogs i.e. Politicians and Hacktivists need not apply.

jc

Pardon any Typos. This IPad does some curious auto- corrections
Post by Gabriel de Figueiredo
Its high time all stray dogs in Goa were caught and put on trucks to New Delhi, right to Maneka's door :-0.
Seriously, who is really looking after these strays? They fight at night and often the bloodied animals are seen in doorways of people in the morning. I know of people who fearfully get out of their houses in the morning not knowing if the injured dogs are rabid or not. The son of a good friend of mine was bitten last June by that mad dog that went on a rampage from the Panjim Bus stand to almost St. Inez, so it not something uncommon.
Dog lovers, if any on this forum I apologise, but I think it is high time the shooters were brought out and stray dogs culled; if any of you object to this suggestion, please gather all the strays and contain them inside your house/yard.
Gabriel
________________________________
From: Gabe Menezes <gabe.menezes at gmail.com>
To: "Goa's premiere mailing list, estb. 1994!" <goanet at lists.goanet.org>
Sent: Thursday, 24 May 2012 6:16 PM
Subject: [Goanet] British grandmother seriously ill with rabies was sent home THREE times by her GP and A&E department before she was diagnosed
The last occurred in July 2005 when a woman from Manchester died after
contracting it from a dog bite during a holiday in the Indian resort of Goa.
Gabe Menezes
2012-05-24 08:16:16 UTC
Permalink
British grandmother seriously ill with rabies was sent home THREE times by
her GP and A&E department before she was diagnosed

- The woman, in her 50s, was bitten by a puppy while on holiday in India
with her husband
- She went to her GP once and the A&E department of Darent Valley
Hospital twice over four days but was sent home each time
- Victim returned to her doctor last Friday and was sent to hospital
with suspected rabies
- A total of 20 people have now been vaccinated against the illness,
including six relatives of the woman, hospital medics and at least one
doctor

By SOPHIE BORLAND<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/search.html?s=&authornamef=Sophie+Borland>
and ANTHONY BOND<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/search.html?s=&authornamef=Anthony+Bond+>

*PUBLISHED:* 20:23, 23 May 2012 | *UPDATED:* 08:43, 24 May 2012

- Comments (126)<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2148915/British-grandmother-seriously-ill-rabies-sent-home-THREE-times-GP-A-amp-E-department-diagnosed.html#comments>
- Share<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2148915/British-grandmother-seriously-ill-rabies-sent-home-THREE-times-GP-A-amp-E-department-diagnosed.html#socialLinks>
-
-
-
-


[image: Seriously ill: A British patient is fighting for their life in
hospital after being bitten by a rabid dog while on holiday in India (file
picture)]

Seriously ill: A British patient is fighting for their life in hospital
after being bitten by a rabid dog while on holiday in India (file picture)

A British grandmother who is seriously ill with rabies was sent home three
times by her GP and a hospital before her illness was diagnosed.

The victim, in her 50s, was bitten by a puppy while on holiday in India
with her husband.

She contracted the illness two months ago but only developed symptoms
within the last fortnight.

According to The Sun, the woman, who lives in London, went to her GP once
and the A&E department of Darent Valley Hospital in Dartford, Kent, twice
over four days.

However, each time she was sent home.

The paper reports that it was only when she returned to her doctor last
Friday that she was sent to hospital and suspected to have rabies.

The victim, who is believed to be of Indian ethnic origin, is being treated
in an isolation room at University College Hospital, London.

Her husband was with her when she was bitten by the dog.

It is believed that 20 people have been vaccinated against the illness,
including six relatives of the woman, hospital medics and at least one
doctor.

It is the first case of rabies in England in almost seven years.

The last occurred in July 2005 when a woman from Manchester died after
contracting it from a dog bite during a holiday in the Indian resort of Goa.

Officials at the Health Protection Agency have stressed that there is no
risk the illness will have been passed on to the general public.


More...

- One in 12 babies pick up dangerous new infections in
hospital<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2148689/One-15-patients-catch-new-infection-hospital.html>
- Meningitis girl, 5, given hours to live recovers to become child
model<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2148799/Meningitis-girl-5-given-hours-live-recovers-child-model.html>

Although the patient has had the virus in Britain for several weeks, it is
only since they became unwell that they risked passing it on.

In theory, the illness can be transmitted by kissing, sex and organ
transplants.
[image: Specialist treatment: The patient is in an isolation room at
University College Hospital, London (above) after developing symptoms
within the last fortnight]

Specialist treatment: The patient is in an isolation room at University
College Hospital, London (above) after developing symptoms within the last
fortnight

Doctors have warned that the chances of a rabies victim surviving are
extremely slim, as once symptoms develop it is nearly always fatal.

It is caused by a virus which spreads through the bloodstream to the brain
and spinal cord.

It can take between four days and 12 weeks to spread, so if patients are
vaccinated in time they can be treated.Early symptoms of rabies include
fever, insomnia, anxiety and sickness.

Dr Brian McCloskey, director of the Health Protection Agency for London,
said: ?It is important to stress that there is no risk to the general
public as a result of this case or to patients and visitors at the hospital
where the patient is receiving treatment.
[image: Deadly: The grandmother's illness is the first case of rabies in
England in almost seven years. The last occurred in July 2005 when a woman
died after contracting it from a dog bite during a holiday in the Indian
resort of Goa, pictured]

Deadly: The grandmother's illness is the first case of rabies in England in
almost seven years. The last occurred in July 2005 when a woman died after
contracting it from a dog bite during a holiday in the Indian resort of
Goa, pictured
[image: Rare: Naturalist David McRae (pictured) became the first person in
Britain to die of the disease for 100 years after he was bitten on the hand
by a rabid bat in 2002]

Rare: Naturalist David McRae (pictured) became the first person in Britain
to die of the disease for 100 years after he was bitten on the hand by a
rabid bat in 2002

'Despite there being tens of thousands of rabies cases each year worldwide,
there have been no documented laboratory confirmed cases of human-to-human
spread.

?Therefore the risk to other humans or animals from a patient with rabies
is considered negligible.

?However, to take every possible precaution, family members and healthcare
staff who had close contact with the patient since they became unwell have
been assessed and offered vaccination.?

In 2002, naturalist David McRae, 56, of Guthrie, Angus, became the first
person in Britain to die of the disease for 100 years after he was bitten
on the hand by a rabid bat.
[image: Killer: Rabies viruses showing their characteristic bullet shape.
The disease has an extremely low survival rate once symptoms have developed]

Killer: Rabies viruses showing their characteristic bullet shape. The
disease has an extremely low survival rate once symptoms have developed
[image: Vaccination programme: Although all but eradicated in the UK rabies
is still common in developing countries]

Vaccination programme: Although all but eradicated in the UK rabies is
still common in developing countries

There have only been three other cases in the UK since 2000. The last time
a Briton caught rabies from a dog in this country, rather than abroad, was
1902.

Rabies is caused by a virus which spreads through the bloodstream to the
brain and spinal cord. It can take between four days and 12 weeks to
spread, so if patients are vaccinated in time they can be treated.

Last night a spokesman from UCLH said: ?The Hospital for Tropical Diseases
is currently looking after a British patient diagnosed with rabies
following a trip abroad. The patient is in a serious condition.

?We would like to reassure our patients, visitors and staff that there is
no risk to them as a result of this case.?

It is believed the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs is
also involved in the case because on of the woman's two cats has recently
been to a vet. However, it is unclear why it needed to see the vet.

The Health Protection Agency has also been notified.


Read more:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2148915/British-grandmother-seriously-ill-rabies-sent-home-THREE-times-GP-A-amp-E-department-diagnosed.html#ixzz1vlz2wwqG
--
DEV BOREM KORUM

Gabe Menezes.
Gabriel de Figueiredo
2012-05-24 13:43:36 UTC
Permalink
Its high time all stray dogs in Goa were caught and put on trucks to New Delhi, right to Maneka's door :-0.??
?
Seriously, who is really looking after these strays? They fight at night and often the bloodied animals are seen in doorways of people in the morning. I know of people who fearfully get out of their houses in the morning not knowing if the injured dogs are rabid or not. The son of a good friend of mine was bitten last?June by that mad dog that went on a rampage from the?Panjim Bus stand to almost St. Inez, so it not something uncommon.
?
Dog lovers, if any on this?forum I apologise, but I think it is high time the shooters were brought out and stray dogs culled; if any of you object to this suggestion, please gather all the strays and contain them inside your house/yard.??
?
Gabriel
________________________________
From: Gabe Menezes <gabe.menezes at gmail.com>
To: "Goa's premiere mailing list, estb. 1994!" <goanet at lists.goanet.org>
Sent: Thursday, 24 May 2012 6:16 PM
Subject: [Goanet] British grandmother seriously ill with rabies was sent home THREE times by her GP and A&E department before she was diagnosed
The last occurred in July 2005 when a woman from Manchester died after
contracting it from a dog bite during a holiday in the Indian resort of Goa.
Gabe Menezes
2012-05-24 08:16:16 UTC
Permalink
British grandmother seriously ill with rabies was sent home THREE times by
her GP and A&E department before she was diagnosed

- The woman, in her 50s, was bitten by a puppy while on holiday in India
with her husband
- She went to her GP once and the A&E department of Darent Valley
Hospital twice over four days but was sent home each time
- Victim returned to her doctor last Friday and was sent to hospital
with suspected rabies
- A total of 20 people have now been vaccinated against the illness,
including six relatives of the woman, hospital medics and at least one
doctor

By SOPHIE BORLAND<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/search.html?s=&authornamef=Sophie+Borland>
and ANTHONY BOND<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/search.html?s=&authornamef=Anthony+Bond+>

*PUBLISHED:* 20:23, 23 May 2012 | *UPDATED:* 08:43, 24 May 2012

- Comments (126)<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2148915/British-grandmother-seriously-ill-rabies-sent-home-THREE-times-GP-A-amp-E-department-diagnosed.html#comments>
- Share<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2148915/British-grandmother-seriously-ill-rabies-sent-home-THREE-times-GP-A-amp-E-department-diagnosed.html#socialLinks>
-
-
-
-


[image: Seriously ill: A British patient is fighting for their life in
hospital after being bitten by a rabid dog while on holiday in India (file
picture)]

Seriously ill: A British patient is fighting for their life in hospital
after being bitten by a rabid dog while on holiday in India (file picture)

A British grandmother who is seriously ill with rabies was sent home three
times by her GP and a hospital before her illness was diagnosed.

The victim, in her 50s, was bitten by a puppy while on holiday in India
with her husband.

She contracted the illness two months ago but only developed symptoms
within the last fortnight.

According to The Sun, the woman, who lives in London, went to her GP once
and the A&E department of Darent Valley Hospital in Dartford, Kent, twice
over four days.

However, each time she was sent home.

The paper reports that it was only when she returned to her doctor last
Friday that she was sent to hospital and suspected to have rabies.

The victim, who is believed to be of Indian ethnic origin, is being treated
in an isolation room at University College Hospital, London.

Her husband was with her when she was bitten by the dog.

It is believed that 20 people have been vaccinated against the illness,
including six relatives of the woman, hospital medics and at least one
doctor.

It is the first case of rabies in England in almost seven years.

The last occurred in July 2005 when a woman from Manchester died after
contracting it from a dog bite during a holiday in the Indian resort of Goa.

Officials at the Health Protection Agency have stressed that there is no
risk the illness will have been passed on to the general public.


More...

- One in 12 babies pick up dangerous new infections in
hospital<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2148689/One-15-patients-catch-new-infection-hospital.html>
- Meningitis girl, 5, given hours to live recovers to become child
model<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2148799/Meningitis-girl-5-given-hours-live-recovers-child-model.html>

Although the patient has had the virus in Britain for several weeks, it is
only since they became unwell that they risked passing it on.

In theory, the illness can be transmitted by kissing, sex and organ
transplants.
[image: Specialist treatment: The patient is in an isolation room at
University College Hospital, London (above) after developing symptoms
within the last fortnight]

Specialist treatment: The patient is in an isolation room at University
College Hospital, London (above) after developing symptoms within the last
fortnight

Doctors have warned that the chances of a rabies victim surviving are
extremely slim, as once symptoms develop it is nearly always fatal.

It is caused by a virus which spreads through the bloodstream to the brain
and spinal cord.

It can take between four days and 12 weeks to spread, so if patients are
vaccinated in time they can be treated.Early symptoms of rabies include
fever, insomnia, anxiety and sickness.

Dr Brian McCloskey, director of the Health Protection Agency for London,
said: ?It is important to stress that there is no risk to the general
public as a result of this case or to patients and visitors at the hospital
where the patient is receiving treatment.
[image: Deadly: The grandmother's illness is the first case of rabies in
England in almost seven years. The last occurred in July 2005 when a woman
died after contracting it from a dog bite during a holiday in the Indian
resort of Goa, pictured]

Deadly: The grandmother's illness is the first case of rabies in England in
almost seven years. The last occurred in July 2005 when a woman died after
contracting it from a dog bite during a holiday in the Indian resort of
Goa, pictured
[image: Rare: Naturalist David McRae (pictured) became the first person in
Britain to die of the disease for 100 years after he was bitten on the hand
by a rabid bat in 2002]

Rare: Naturalist David McRae (pictured) became the first person in Britain
to die of the disease for 100 years after he was bitten on the hand by a
rabid bat in 2002

'Despite there being tens of thousands of rabies cases each year worldwide,
there have been no documented laboratory confirmed cases of human-to-human
spread.

?Therefore the risk to other humans or animals from a patient with rabies
is considered negligible.

?However, to take every possible precaution, family members and healthcare
staff who had close contact with the patient since they became unwell have
been assessed and offered vaccination.?

In 2002, naturalist David McRae, 56, of Guthrie, Angus, became the first
person in Britain to die of the disease for 100 years after he was bitten
on the hand by a rabid bat.
[image: Killer: Rabies viruses showing their characteristic bullet shape.
The disease has an extremely low survival rate once symptoms have developed]

Killer: Rabies viruses showing their characteristic bullet shape. The
disease has an extremely low survival rate once symptoms have developed
[image: Vaccination programme: Although all but eradicated in the UK rabies
is still common in developing countries]

Vaccination programme: Although all but eradicated in the UK rabies is
still common in developing countries

There have only been three other cases in the UK since 2000. The last time
a Briton caught rabies from a dog in this country, rather than abroad, was
1902.

Rabies is caused by a virus which spreads through the bloodstream to the
brain and spinal cord. It can take between four days and 12 weeks to
spread, so if patients are vaccinated in time they can be treated.

Last night a spokesman from UCLH said: ?The Hospital for Tropical Diseases
is currently looking after a British patient diagnosed with rabies
following a trip abroad. The patient is in a serious condition.

?We would like to reassure our patients, visitors and staff that there is
no risk to them as a result of this case.?

It is believed the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs is
also involved in the case because on of the woman's two cats has recently
been to a vet. However, it is unclear why it needed to see the vet.

The Health Protection Agency has also been notified.


Read more:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2148915/British-grandmother-seriously-ill-rabies-sent-home-THREE-times-GP-A-amp-E-department-diagnosed.html#ixzz1vlz2wwqG
--
DEV BOREM KORUM

Gabe Menezes.
Gabriel de Figueiredo
2012-05-24 13:43:36 UTC
Permalink
Its high time all stray dogs in Goa were caught and put on trucks to New Delhi, right to Maneka's door :-0.??
?
Seriously, who is really looking after these strays? They fight at night and often the bloodied animals are seen in doorways of people in the morning. I know of people who fearfully get out of their houses in the morning not knowing if the injured dogs are rabid or not. The son of a good friend of mine was bitten last?June by that mad dog that went on a rampage from the?Panjim Bus stand to almost St. Inez, so it not something uncommon.
?
Dog lovers, if any on this?forum I apologise, but I think it is high time the shooters were brought out and stray dogs culled; if any of you object to this suggestion, please gather all the strays and contain them inside your house/yard.??
?
Gabriel
________________________________
From: Gabe Menezes <gabe.menezes at gmail.com>
To: "Goa's premiere mailing list, estb. 1994!" <goanet at lists.goanet.org>
Sent: Thursday, 24 May 2012 6:16 PM
Subject: [Goanet] British grandmother seriously ill with rabies was sent home THREE times by her GP and A&E department before she was diagnosed
The last occurred in July 2005 when a woman from Manchester died after
contracting it from a dog bite during a holiday in the Indian resort of Goa.
Gabe Menezes
2012-05-24 08:16:16 UTC
Permalink
British grandmother seriously ill with rabies was sent home THREE times by
her GP and A&E department before she was diagnosed

- The woman, in her 50s, was bitten by a puppy while on holiday in India
with her husband
- She went to her GP once and the A&E department of Darent Valley
Hospital twice over four days but was sent home each time
- Victim returned to her doctor last Friday and was sent to hospital
with suspected rabies
- A total of 20 people have now been vaccinated against the illness,
including six relatives of the woman, hospital medics and at least one
doctor

By SOPHIE BORLAND<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/search.html?s=&authornamef=Sophie+Borland>
and ANTHONY BOND<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/search.html?s=&authornamef=Anthony+Bond+>

*PUBLISHED:* 20:23, 23 May 2012 | *UPDATED:* 08:43, 24 May 2012

- Comments (126)<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2148915/British-grandmother-seriously-ill-rabies-sent-home-THREE-times-GP-A-amp-E-department-diagnosed.html#comments>
- Share<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2148915/British-grandmother-seriously-ill-rabies-sent-home-THREE-times-GP-A-amp-E-department-diagnosed.html#socialLinks>
-
-
-
-


[image: Seriously ill: A British patient is fighting for their life in
hospital after being bitten by a rabid dog while on holiday in India (file
picture)]

Seriously ill: A British patient is fighting for their life in hospital
after being bitten by a rabid dog while on holiday in India (file picture)

A British grandmother who is seriously ill with rabies was sent home three
times by her GP and a hospital before her illness was diagnosed.

The victim, in her 50s, was bitten by a puppy while on holiday in India
with her husband.

She contracted the illness two months ago but only developed symptoms
within the last fortnight.

According to The Sun, the woman, who lives in London, went to her GP once
and the A&E department of Darent Valley Hospital in Dartford, Kent, twice
over four days.

However, each time she was sent home.

The paper reports that it was only when she returned to her doctor last
Friday that she was sent to hospital and suspected to have rabies.

The victim, who is believed to be of Indian ethnic origin, is being treated
in an isolation room at University College Hospital, London.

Her husband was with her when she was bitten by the dog.

It is believed that 20 people have been vaccinated against the illness,
including six relatives of the woman, hospital medics and at least one
doctor.

It is the first case of rabies in England in almost seven years.

The last occurred in July 2005 when a woman from Manchester died after
contracting it from a dog bite during a holiday in the Indian resort of Goa.

Officials at the Health Protection Agency have stressed that there is no
risk the illness will have been passed on to the general public.


More...

- One in 12 babies pick up dangerous new infections in
hospital<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2148689/One-15-patients-catch-new-infection-hospital.html>
- Meningitis girl, 5, given hours to live recovers to become child
model<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2148799/Meningitis-girl-5-given-hours-live-recovers-child-model.html>

Although the patient has had the virus in Britain for several weeks, it is
only since they became unwell that they risked passing it on.

In theory, the illness can be transmitted by kissing, sex and organ
transplants.
[image: Specialist treatment: The patient is in an isolation room at
University College Hospital, London (above) after developing symptoms
within the last fortnight]

Specialist treatment: The patient is in an isolation room at University
College Hospital, London (above) after developing symptoms within the last
fortnight

Doctors have warned that the chances of a rabies victim surviving are
extremely slim, as once symptoms develop it is nearly always fatal.

It is caused by a virus which spreads through the bloodstream to the brain
and spinal cord.

It can take between four days and 12 weeks to spread, so if patients are
vaccinated in time they can be treated.Early symptoms of rabies include
fever, insomnia, anxiety and sickness.

Dr Brian McCloskey, director of the Health Protection Agency for London,
said: ?It is important to stress that there is no risk to the general
public as a result of this case or to patients and visitors at the hospital
where the patient is receiving treatment.
[image: Deadly: The grandmother's illness is the first case of rabies in
England in almost seven years. The last occurred in July 2005 when a woman
died after contracting it from a dog bite during a holiday in the Indian
resort of Goa, pictured]

Deadly: The grandmother's illness is the first case of rabies in England in
almost seven years. The last occurred in July 2005 when a woman died after
contracting it from a dog bite during a holiday in the Indian resort of
Goa, pictured
[image: Rare: Naturalist David McRae (pictured) became the first person in
Britain to die of the disease for 100 years after he was bitten on the hand
by a rabid bat in 2002]

Rare: Naturalist David McRae (pictured) became the first person in Britain
to die of the disease for 100 years after he was bitten on the hand by a
rabid bat in 2002

'Despite there being tens of thousands of rabies cases each year worldwide,
there have been no documented laboratory confirmed cases of human-to-human
spread.

?Therefore the risk to other humans or animals from a patient with rabies
is considered negligible.

?However, to take every possible precaution, family members and healthcare
staff who had close contact with the patient since they became unwell have
been assessed and offered vaccination.?

In 2002, naturalist David McRae, 56, of Guthrie, Angus, became the first
person in Britain to die of the disease for 100 years after he was bitten
on the hand by a rabid bat.
[image: Killer: Rabies viruses showing their characteristic bullet shape.
The disease has an extremely low survival rate once symptoms have developed]

Killer: Rabies viruses showing their characteristic bullet shape. The
disease has an extremely low survival rate once symptoms have developed
[image: Vaccination programme: Although all but eradicated in the UK rabies
is still common in developing countries]

Vaccination programme: Although all but eradicated in the UK rabies is
still common in developing countries

There have only been three other cases in the UK since 2000. The last time
a Briton caught rabies from a dog in this country, rather than abroad, was
1902.

Rabies is caused by a virus which spreads through the bloodstream to the
brain and spinal cord. It can take between four days and 12 weeks to
spread, so if patients are vaccinated in time they can be treated.

Last night a spokesman from UCLH said: ?The Hospital for Tropical Diseases
is currently looking after a British patient diagnosed with rabies
following a trip abroad. The patient is in a serious condition.

?We would like to reassure our patients, visitors and staff that there is
no risk to them as a result of this case.?

It is believed the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs is
also involved in the case because on of the woman's two cats has recently
been to a vet. However, it is unclear why it needed to see the vet.

The Health Protection Agency has also been notified.


Read more:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2148915/British-grandmother-seriously-ill-rabies-sent-home-THREE-times-GP-A-amp-E-department-diagnosed.html#ixzz1vlz2wwqG
--
DEV BOREM KORUM

Gabe Menezes.
Gabriel de Figueiredo
2012-05-24 13:43:36 UTC
Permalink
Its high time all stray dogs in Goa were caught and put on trucks to New Delhi, right to Maneka's door :-0.??
?
Seriously, who is really looking after these strays? They fight at night and often the bloodied animals are seen in doorways of people in the morning. I know of people who fearfully get out of their houses in the morning not knowing if the injured dogs are rabid or not. The son of a good friend of mine was bitten last?June by that mad dog that went on a rampage from the?Panjim Bus stand to almost St. Inez, so it not something uncommon.
?
Dog lovers, if any on this?forum I apologise, but I think it is high time the shooters were brought out and stray dogs culled; if any of you object to this suggestion, please gather all the strays and contain them inside your house/yard.??
?
Gabriel
________________________________
From: Gabe Menezes <gabe.menezes at gmail.com>
To: "Goa's premiere mailing list, estb. 1994!" <goanet at lists.goanet.org>
Sent: Thursday, 24 May 2012 6:16 PM
Subject: [Goanet] British grandmother seriously ill with rabies was sent home THREE times by her GP and A&E department before she was diagnosed
The last occurred in July 2005 when a woman from Manchester died after
contracting it from a dog bite during a holiday in the Indian resort of Goa.
Gabe Menezes
2012-05-24 08:16:16 UTC
Permalink
British grandmother seriously ill with rabies was sent home THREE times by
her GP and A&E department before she was diagnosed

- The woman, in her 50s, was bitten by a puppy while on holiday in India
with her husband
- She went to her GP once and the A&E department of Darent Valley
Hospital twice over four days but was sent home each time
- Victim returned to her doctor last Friday and was sent to hospital
with suspected rabies
- A total of 20 people have now been vaccinated against the illness,
including six relatives of the woman, hospital medics and at least one
doctor

By SOPHIE BORLAND<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/search.html?s=&authornamef=Sophie+Borland>
and ANTHONY BOND<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/search.html?s=&authornamef=Anthony+Bond+>

*PUBLISHED:* 20:23, 23 May 2012 | *UPDATED:* 08:43, 24 May 2012

- Comments (126)<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2148915/British-grandmother-seriously-ill-rabies-sent-home-THREE-times-GP-A-amp-E-department-diagnosed.html#comments>
- Share<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2148915/British-grandmother-seriously-ill-rabies-sent-home-THREE-times-GP-A-amp-E-department-diagnosed.html#socialLinks>
-
-
-
-


[image: Seriously ill: A British patient is fighting for their life in
hospital after being bitten by a rabid dog while on holiday in India (file
picture)]

Seriously ill: A British patient is fighting for their life in hospital
after being bitten by a rabid dog while on holiday in India (file picture)

A British grandmother who is seriously ill with rabies was sent home three
times by her GP and a hospital before her illness was diagnosed.

The victim, in her 50s, was bitten by a puppy while on holiday in India
with her husband.

She contracted the illness two months ago but only developed symptoms
within the last fortnight.

According to The Sun, the woman, who lives in London, went to her GP once
and the A&E department of Darent Valley Hospital in Dartford, Kent, twice
over four days.

However, each time she was sent home.

The paper reports that it was only when she returned to her doctor last
Friday that she was sent to hospital and suspected to have rabies.

The victim, who is believed to be of Indian ethnic origin, is being treated
in an isolation room at University College Hospital, London.

Her husband was with her when she was bitten by the dog.

It is believed that 20 people have been vaccinated against the illness,
including six relatives of the woman, hospital medics and at least one
doctor.

It is the first case of rabies in England in almost seven years.

The last occurred in July 2005 when a woman from Manchester died after
contracting it from a dog bite during a holiday in the Indian resort of Goa.

Officials at the Health Protection Agency have stressed that there is no
risk the illness will have been passed on to the general public.


More...

- One in 12 babies pick up dangerous new infections in
hospital<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2148689/One-15-patients-catch-new-infection-hospital.html>
- Meningitis girl, 5, given hours to live recovers to become child
model<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2148799/Meningitis-girl-5-given-hours-live-recovers-child-model.html>

Although the patient has had the virus in Britain for several weeks, it is
only since they became unwell that they risked passing it on.

In theory, the illness can be transmitted by kissing, sex and organ
transplants.
[image: Specialist treatment: The patient is in an isolation room at
University College Hospital, London (above) after developing symptoms
within the last fortnight]

Specialist treatment: The patient is in an isolation room at University
College Hospital, London (above) after developing symptoms within the last
fortnight

Doctors have warned that the chances of a rabies victim surviving are
extremely slim, as once symptoms develop it is nearly always fatal.

It is caused by a virus which spreads through the bloodstream to the brain
and spinal cord.

It can take between four days and 12 weeks to spread, so if patients are
vaccinated in time they can be treated.Early symptoms of rabies include
fever, insomnia, anxiety and sickness.

Dr Brian McCloskey, director of the Health Protection Agency for London,
said: ?It is important to stress that there is no risk to the general
public as a result of this case or to patients and visitors at the hospital
where the patient is receiving treatment.
[image: Deadly: The grandmother's illness is the first case of rabies in
England in almost seven years. The last occurred in July 2005 when a woman
died after contracting it from a dog bite during a holiday in the Indian
resort of Goa, pictured]

Deadly: The grandmother's illness is the first case of rabies in England in
almost seven years. The last occurred in July 2005 when a woman died after
contracting it from a dog bite during a holiday in the Indian resort of
Goa, pictured
[image: Rare: Naturalist David McRae (pictured) became the first person in
Britain to die of the disease for 100 years after he was bitten on the hand
by a rabid bat in 2002]

Rare: Naturalist David McRae (pictured) became the first person in Britain
to die of the disease for 100 years after he was bitten on the hand by a
rabid bat in 2002

'Despite there being tens of thousands of rabies cases each year worldwide,
there have been no documented laboratory confirmed cases of human-to-human
spread.

?Therefore the risk to other humans or animals from a patient with rabies
is considered negligible.

?However, to take every possible precaution, family members and healthcare
staff who had close contact with the patient since they became unwell have
been assessed and offered vaccination.?

In 2002, naturalist David McRae, 56, of Guthrie, Angus, became the first
person in Britain to die of the disease for 100 years after he was bitten
on the hand by a rabid bat.
[image: Killer: Rabies viruses showing their characteristic bullet shape.
The disease has an extremely low survival rate once symptoms have developed]

Killer: Rabies viruses showing their characteristic bullet shape. The
disease has an extremely low survival rate once symptoms have developed
[image: Vaccination programme: Although all but eradicated in the UK rabies
is still common in developing countries]

Vaccination programme: Although all but eradicated in the UK rabies is
still common in developing countries

There have only been three other cases in the UK since 2000. The last time
a Briton caught rabies from a dog in this country, rather than abroad, was
1902.

Rabies is caused by a virus which spreads through the bloodstream to the
brain and spinal cord. It can take between four days and 12 weeks to
spread, so if patients are vaccinated in time they can be treated.

Last night a spokesman from UCLH said: ?The Hospital for Tropical Diseases
is currently looking after a British patient diagnosed with rabies
following a trip abroad. The patient is in a serious condition.

?We would like to reassure our patients, visitors and staff that there is
no risk to them as a result of this case.?

It is believed the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs is
also involved in the case because on of the woman's two cats has recently
been to a vet. However, it is unclear why it needed to see the vet.

The Health Protection Agency has also been notified.


Read more:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2148915/British-grandmother-seriously-ill-rabies-sent-home-THREE-times-GP-A-amp-E-department-diagnosed.html#ixzz1vlz2wwqG
--
DEV BOREM KORUM

Gabe Menezes.
Gabriel de Figueiredo
2012-05-24 13:43:36 UTC
Permalink
Its high time all stray dogs in Goa were caught and put on trucks to New Delhi, right to Maneka's door :-0.??
?
Seriously, who is really looking after these strays? They fight at night and often the bloodied animals are seen in doorways of people in the morning. I know of people who fearfully get out of their houses in the morning not knowing if the injured dogs are rabid or not. The son of a good friend of mine was bitten last?June by that mad dog that went on a rampage from the?Panjim Bus stand to almost St. Inez, so it not something uncommon.
?
Dog lovers, if any on this?forum I apologise, but I think it is high time the shooters were brought out and stray dogs culled; if any of you object to this suggestion, please gather all the strays and contain them inside your house/yard.??
?
Gabriel
________________________________
From: Gabe Menezes <gabe.menezes at gmail.com>
To: "Goa's premiere mailing list, estb. 1994!" <goanet at lists.goanet.org>
Sent: Thursday, 24 May 2012 6:16 PM
Subject: [Goanet] British grandmother seriously ill with rabies was sent home THREE times by her GP and A&E department before she was diagnosed
The last occurred in July 2005 when a woman from Manchester died after
contracting it from a dog bite during a holiday in the Indian resort of Goa.
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