Discussion:
[Goanet] Quackery on Herald
Stephen Dias
2014-01-26 10:43:40 UTC
Permalink
Thank You Dr. Santosh.
Neuroscientist,

Thank You for your valuable comments. So far we haven't received any
comments from our local physicians. Dr Santosh had a courtesy to
forward a suitable article for all concerned in the Goanet readers for
information.
I therefore request the Goanet to take up this issue in public
interest as this kind of quack doctors should not take the liberty to
fool the people of Goa. This was in response to the Herald cafe news
report dt 22.1.2014 coming from Crystal Healer Tarminder Manchanda "a
quack doctor" who has been interviewed by Patricia Ann Alvares, where
she highlights the curative value of crystals while debunking myths.
Hope the public is not taken for a ride, since Dr Joe D'Sousa and Dr
Santosh Helekar a Goan based neuro scientist abroad thinks there is
no scientific evidence on this healing methods.
The newspapers also should be careful publishing such articles from
different kind of healers and needs to be discouraged.

Stephen Dias
D.Paula

Stephen Dias
D.Paula

On 26 January 2014 09:40, Santosh Helekar <chimbelcho at gmail.com> wrote:
> Here is the article to which Stephen was referring:
>
> http://www.epaperoheraldo.in/epaperpdf/2212014/2212014-md-hr-17.pdf
>
> Crystal healing is just another example of many forms of quackery that
> are practiced in the world today. Quackery is almost as big a business
> today as modern medicine. Indeed, it is to the practice of modern
> medicine (when ethically conducted) what black market and fraud are to
> legitimate business. The trouble however is that a fraudster or an
> unethical medical doctor can be prosecuted under well-defined laws.
> But this is not the case with quacks who peddle nonsense like crystal
> healing. They are not only free to fool and fleece the public, but as
> in the present case, they get free publicity through the popular
> media, the members of which are more often than not scientifically
> illiterate, or worse, anti-science in their ideological stance.
>
> There is a stereotypic modus operandi followed by all quacks, which is
> easy to recognize. They prey upon the gullibility of the lay public,
> especially those who are desperately looking for any respite from
> sickness and pain. They say that they are performing miracles,
> believing that they are privileged individuals who are blessed with
> the rare heavenly gift of healing. After merely attending some New Age
> workshop or reading a Self-Help book they claim that literally
> overnight they have become great healers. They dispense selectively
> remembered anecdotes that feed their confirmation bias while
> conveniently forgetting those that crap on it. Without retaining any
> understanding of basic high school physics, chemistry and biology, nor
> the slightest clue about the difficult concepts of modern science they
> use scientific sounding terms such as energy, vibrations, frequency,
> resonance, electromagnetic waves, electric charge, cells, etc. One
> surefire weapon in their arsenal is an appeal to religious feelings
> and to the popular misguided reverence towards ancient wisdom.
> Prescientific faith-based or superstitious beliefs, such as karma,
> chakra, chi, soul, spirit, and so on, figure prominently in their
> self-promotional shtick. Having absolutely no idea of what it entails,
> they tell others that they have conducted extensive research into
> whatever quack remedy that they are peddling at any given moment. They
> also pose as universal experts on all types of quack remedies.
>
> If you read the Herald interview in question you will detect all the
> above signs of a quack?s sales pitch. The truth is crystals and stones
> have no physical effect on the human body. The use of scientific terms
> such as frequencies, vibrations, etc. is totally nonsensical in the
> context of disease and treatment. As far as science is concerned,
> whether it is basic physics and biology, or medicine, itself, the
> verbiage in the answers to the reporter?s questions may as well have
> been muttered by an inebriated person in a drunken stupor. No
> scientific theory or experiment supports any of the assertions made in
> the interview. It is really unfortunate that newspapers deceive their
> readers in this manner.
>
> Here is a nice article by a science writer in a recent issue of
> Skeptical Inquirer exposing the absurdity of crystal ?healing?:
>
> http://www.csicop.org/specialarticles/show/diamonds_a_doctors_best_friend/
>
> Here is a quote that sums it all up:
>
> QUOTE
> But instead of having the answer to all our maladies stuck in stone
> beneath our feet, crystals, while something to look at and study, have
> no biological or physical mechanisms through which they could affect
> human health. Perhaps a glittering diamond would make you happy, and
> therefore alleviate stress or give you calm, but it certainly does not
> tap into a yet undiscovered ?human frequency? like someone searching
> for a radio station. Nothing about the natural world suggests that a
> certain arrangement of a mineral?s atoms will do anything for the
> human body other than please the eye. Can we reduce crystal healing to
> the absurd?
> UNQUOTE
>
> Cheers,
>
> Santosh
>
> On Fri, Jan 24, 2014 at 7:15 PM, Santosh Helekar <chimbelcho at gmail.com> wrote:
>> Can you please send me the article to which you are referring?
>> Perhaps, I will be able to offer the feedback that you seek. I share
>> your concern about quackery being spread through the internet and by
>> the popular press.
>>
>> Cheers,
>>
>> Santosh
>>
>>
>>> On Friday, January 24, 2014 1:46 AM, Stephen Dias <steve.dias60 at gmail.com> wrote:
>>> > Ref; Article on Herald Caf? appeared on dated 22th January 2014 titled
>>> HEALING WITH CRYSTALS
>>>
>>> In an interview with Patricia Ann Alvares with Crystal Haler Tarminder
>>> Manchanda she highlights the curative value of crystals while
>>> debunking myths
>>>
>>> I, Dr Joe D?Sousa ex-professor of Microbiology at Goa University and
>>> reader of Herald found this article weird and query which would take
>>> people for a ride and could do more harm than good. I would like the
>>> reaction from our Medical Practitioners and physicians in Goa in the
>>> interest of people of Goa who may have to suffer adverse consequences
>>> of this false cure as I do not see any scientific proof of this new
>>> system of medicine. I want you all to guide the public so that people
>>> of Goa are not led astray by dubious methodlogy of cure.
>>>
>>> I would like to get the feedback from the medical practitioners and
>>> advice the public by writing articles in the public interest and also
>>> request to inform me via this mail Id of my friend.
>>>
>>> Thank You
>>>
>>> Dr. Joe D?Sousa
>>> Panjim
>>>
>> *****************************************************************
>> No offense meant. But let the chips fall where they may.
>> *****************************************************************
>
>
>
> --
> *****************************************************************
> No offense meant. But let the chips fall where they may.
> *****************************************************************
Dr. Ferdinando dos Reis Falc√£o
2014-01-26 14:47:30 UTC
Permalink
Stephen Dias steve.dias60 at
gmail.com on Sun Jan 26 02:43:40 PST 2014 posts a e-mail from Santosh Helekar
under caption: Quackery on Herald.:

Thank You Dr. Santosh.

Neuroscientist,

Thank You for your valuable
comments.




RESPONSE:



Stephen and members of this Forum.

I would like to clarify that Helekar's
mail to Stephen is no better than any of our Goan politician?s explanation to the
public in respect to any incident. I hope Stephen learns to be more observant
and questioning to such replies.


Mr. Helekar volunteers to give a
feedback on ?crystal healing? even though Dr. Joe D?Souza sought the reaction
and feedback from Medical Practitioners and Physicians in Goa, of which Mr. Helekar is neither.

In his volunteered reaction Mr.
Helekar writes about quackery, modus operandi of quacks, blackmarketeers,
gullible public, healers, various physical nomenclature, superstitious beliefs,
and also cites a so called science writer?s article ( which I assume is Mr?
Helekar?s ?credible? website as he has said before here: http://lists.goanet.org/pipermail/goanet-goanet.org/2013-December/236812.html).



But NOWHERE does he prove that
crystal therapy if False.

Nor has he explained WHAT IS this crystal therapy.

And as he has stated in the post
cited above, the feedback according to him is an ?accurate information from reliable
sources in his possession.?

I am sure Mr. Helekar will retort as
he usually does, that the FDA has not approved crystals for therapeutic use, OR
that there is no peer reviewed scientific research journal published to
substantiate this claim of crystal healing. Therefore it is quackery!


In the same stride, I am sure Mr. Helekar will have to affirm that
acupuncture is also Quackery?!

Is there any peer review scientific research
proving it is not effective? Does modern science even know how acupuncture
works? Does modern medicine know what is
?Qi, yin, yang and meridians??

Read Scientific view on TCM theory

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acupuncture#Scientific_view_on_TCM_theory


Quote: Qi, yin, yang and
meridians have no counterpart in modern studies of chemistry, biology, physics, or human
physiology and to date scientists have been unable to find evidence that
supports their existence. Unquote.


But everyone
knows that Acupuncture works for several chronic pain conditions and short term
regional anaesthesia.

Read here why
Clinicians as well as NHS recommend acupuncture:

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2013/jul/26/acupuncture-sceptics-proof-effective-nhs


Dr. Joe D?Souza did not request the
feedback specifically from medical practitioners and Physicians for nothing. It
is because only clinicians have a broader outlook towards therapies as they
cannot afford to be dogmatic and wear blinders, and also because they are in
touch with patients.




Dr. Ferdinando dos Reis Falc?o.
Santosh Helekar
2014-01-27 01:08:46 UTC
Permalink
I am sure sober-minded objective readers will figure out whether what Falcao has written below makes any sense at all or not, in terms providing medical scientific evidence in support of the quack practices of crystal healing and acupuncture.

But I wanted to point out some more accurate facts. Falcao got his medical degree from the same medical college from which I got mine, namely Goa Medical College. None of our professors or our medical textbooks ever justified or advocated the quack remedies of crystal healing and acupuncture. This is also true of professors and textbooks of today. The magazine Skeptical Inquirer in which the article debunking crystal healing that I referred to in my last post appeared, is recognized world-wide as a highly credible source on scientific skepticism about quackery and superstition, and on science and reason. If you are among those who only respect figures of authority, here is an article entitled "The Dangers of Complementary Therapy" on all forms of quackery propagated under the term of "complementary" medicine by the world renowned cancer surgeon Michael Baum:

http://breast-cancer-research.com/content/9/S2/S10

Here is a quote involving crystal therapy:

QUOTE
It is therefore not an option to have an open mind about homeopathy or similarly implausible forms of alternative/complementary medicine, for example Bach Flower remedies, spiritual healing and crystal therapy.
UNQUOTE

Here is one debunking acupuncture by the Yale University Neurologist Steven Novella and others:

http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/reference/acupuncture/

The subheadings of this article are:

"1. Acupuncture is a pre-scientific superstition"

"2. Acupuncture lacks a plausible mechanism"

"3. Claims for efficacy are often based upon a bait-and-switch deception"

"4. Clinical trials show that acupuncture does not work"

Please let me know if you need any more accurate credible information exposing quack practices such as these.

Cheers,

Santosh



> On Sunday, January 26, 2014 2:21 PM, Dr. Ferdinando dos Reis Falc?o <drferdinando at hotmail.com> wrote:
> >
>
> Stephen Dias steve.dias60 at
> gmail.com on Sun Jan 26 02:43:40 PST 2014 posts a e-mail from Santosh Helekar
> under caption: Quackery on Herald.:
>
> Thank You Dr. Santosh.
>
> Neuroscientist,
>
> Thank You for your valuable
> comments.
>
>
>
>
> RESPONSE:
>
>
>
> Stephen and members of this Forum.
>
> I would like to clarify that Helekar's
> mail to Stephen is no better than any of our Goan politician?s explanation to
> the
> public in respect to any incident. I hope Stephen learns to be more observant
> and questioning to such replies.
>
>
> Mr. Helekar volunteers to give a
> feedback on ?crystal healing? even though Dr. Joe D?Souza sought the reaction
> and feedback from Medical Practitioners and Physicians in Goa, of which? Mr.
> Helekar is neither.
>
> In his volunteered reaction Mr.
> Helekar writes about quackery, modus operandi of quacks, blackmarketeers,
> gullible public, healers, various physical nomenclature, superstitious beliefs,
> and also cites a so called science writer?s article ( which I assume is Mr?
> Helekar?s ?credible? website as he has said before here:
> http://lists.goanet.org/pipermail/goanet-goanet.org/2013-December/236812.html).
>
>
>
> But NOWHERE does he prove that
> crystal therapy if False.
>
> Nor has he explained WHAT IS? this crystal therapy.
>
> And as he has stated in the post
> cited above, the feedback according to him is an ?accurate information from
> reliable
> sources in his possession.?
>
> I am sure Mr. Helekar will retort as
> he usually does, that the FDA has not approved crystals for therapeutic use, OR
> that there is no peer reviewed scientific research journal published to
> substantiate this claim of crystal healing. Therefore it is quackery!
>
>
> In the same stride, I am sure? Mr. Helekar will have to affirm that
> acupuncture is also Quackery?!
>
> Is there any peer review scientific research
> proving it is not effective? Does modern science even know how acupuncture
> works?? Does modern medicine know what is
> ?Qi, yin, yang and meridians??
>
> Read Scientific view on TCM theory
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acupuncture#Scientific_view_on_TCM_theory
>
>
> Quote: Qi, yin, yang and
> meridians have no counterpart in modern studies of chemistry, biology, physics,
> or human
> physiology and to date scientists have been unable to find evidence that
> supports their existence. Unquote.
>
>
> But everyone
> knows that Acupuncture works for several chronic pain conditions and short term
> regional anaesthesia.
>
> Read here why
> Clinicians as well as NHS recommend acupuncture:
>
> http://www.theguardian.com/science/2013/jul/26/acupuncture-sceptics-proof-effective-nhs
>
>
> Dr. Joe D?Souza did not request the
> feedback specifically from medical practitioners and Physicians for nothing. It
> is because only clinicians have a broader outlook towards therapies as they
> cannot afford to be dogmatic and wear blinders, and also because they are in
> touch with patients.
>
>
>
>
> Dr. Ferdinando dos Reis Falc?o.? ??? ??? ??? ? ??? ??? ?
>
Santosh Helekar
2014-01-27 01:08:46 UTC
Permalink
I am sure sober-minded objective readers will figure out whether what Falcao has written below makes any sense at all or not, in terms providing medical scientific evidence in support of the quack practices of crystal healing and acupuncture.

But I wanted to point out some more accurate facts. Falcao got his medical degree from the same medical college from which I got mine, namely Goa Medical College. None of our professors or our medical textbooks ever justified or advocated the quack remedies of crystal healing and acupuncture. This is also true of professors and textbooks of today. The magazine Skeptical Inquirer in which the article debunking crystal healing that I referred to in my last post appeared, is recognized world-wide as a highly credible source on scientific skepticism about quackery and superstition, and on science and reason. If you are among those who only respect figures of authority, here is an article entitled "The Dangers of Complementary Therapy" on all forms of quackery propagated under the term of "complementary" medicine by the world renowned cancer surgeon Michael Baum:

http://breast-cancer-research.com/content/9/S2/S10

Here is a quote involving crystal therapy:

QUOTE
It is therefore not an option to have an open mind about homeopathy or similarly implausible forms of alternative/complementary medicine, for example Bach Flower remedies, spiritual healing and crystal therapy.
UNQUOTE

Here is one debunking acupuncture by the Yale University Neurologist Steven Novella and others:

http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/reference/acupuncture/

The subheadings of this article are:

"1. Acupuncture is a pre-scientific superstition"

"2. Acupuncture lacks a plausible mechanism"

"3. Claims for efficacy are often based upon a bait-and-switch deception"

"4. Clinical trials show that acupuncture does not work"

Please let me know if you need any more accurate credible information exposing quack practices such as these.

Cheers,

Santosh



> On Sunday, January 26, 2014 2:21 PM, Dr. Ferdinando dos Reis Falc?o <drferdinando at hotmail.com> wrote:
> >
>
> Stephen Dias steve.dias60 at
> gmail.com on Sun Jan 26 02:43:40 PST 2014 posts a e-mail from Santosh Helekar
> under caption: Quackery on Herald.:
>
> Thank You Dr. Santosh.
>
> Neuroscientist,
>
> Thank You for your valuable
> comments.
>
>
>
>
> RESPONSE:
>
>
>
> Stephen and members of this Forum.
>
> I would like to clarify that Helekar's
> mail to Stephen is no better than any of our Goan politician?s explanation to
> the
> public in respect to any incident. I hope Stephen learns to be more observant
> and questioning to such replies.
>
>
> Mr. Helekar volunteers to give a
> feedback on ?crystal healing? even though Dr. Joe D?Souza sought the reaction
> and feedback from Medical Practitioners and Physicians in Goa, of which? Mr.
> Helekar is neither.
>
> In his volunteered reaction Mr.
> Helekar writes about quackery, modus operandi of quacks, blackmarketeers,
> gullible public, healers, various physical nomenclature, superstitious beliefs,
> and also cites a so called science writer?s article ( which I assume is Mr?
> Helekar?s ?credible? website as he has said before here:
> http://lists.goanet.org/pipermail/goanet-goanet.org/2013-December/236812.html).
>
>
>
> But NOWHERE does he prove that
> crystal therapy if False.
>
> Nor has he explained WHAT IS? this crystal therapy.
>
> And as he has stated in the post
> cited above, the feedback according to him is an ?accurate information from
> reliable
> sources in his possession.?
>
> I am sure Mr. Helekar will retort as
> he usually does, that the FDA has not approved crystals for therapeutic use, OR
> that there is no peer reviewed scientific research journal published to
> substantiate this claim of crystal healing. Therefore it is quackery!
>
>
> In the same stride, I am sure? Mr. Helekar will have to affirm that
> acupuncture is also Quackery?!
>
> Is there any peer review scientific research
> proving it is not effective? Does modern science even know how acupuncture
> works?? Does modern medicine know what is
> ?Qi, yin, yang and meridians??
>
> Read Scientific view on TCM theory
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acupuncture#Scientific_view_on_TCM_theory
>
>
> Quote: Qi, yin, yang and
> meridians have no counterpart in modern studies of chemistry, biology, physics,
> or human
> physiology and to date scientists have been unable to find evidence that
> supports their existence. Unquote.
>
>
> But everyone
> knows that Acupuncture works for several chronic pain conditions and short term
> regional anaesthesia.
>
> Read here why
> Clinicians as well as NHS recommend acupuncture:
>
> http://www.theguardian.com/science/2013/jul/26/acupuncture-sceptics-proof-effective-nhs
>
>
> Dr. Joe D?Souza did not request the
> feedback specifically from medical practitioners and Physicians for nothing. It
> is because only clinicians have a broader outlook towards therapies as they
> cannot afford to be dogmatic and wear blinders, and also because they are in
> touch with patients.
>
>
>
>
> Dr. Ferdinando dos Reis Falc?o.? ??? ??? ??? ? ??? ??? ?
>
Santosh Helekar
2014-01-27 01:08:46 UTC
Permalink
I am sure sober-minded objective readers will figure out whether what Falcao has written below makes any sense at all or not, in terms providing medical scientific evidence in support of the quack practices of crystal healing and acupuncture.

But I wanted to point out some more accurate facts. Falcao got his medical degree from the same medical college from which I got mine, namely Goa Medical College. None of our professors or our medical textbooks ever justified or advocated the quack remedies of crystal healing and acupuncture. This is also true of professors and textbooks of today. The magazine Skeptical Inquirer in which the article debunking crystal healing that I referred to in my last post appeared, is recognized world-wide as a highly credible source on scientific skepticism about quackery and superstition, and on science and reason. If you are among those who only respect figures of authority, here is an article entitled "The Dangers of Complementary Therapy" on all forms of quackery propagated under the term of "complementary" medicine by the world renowned cancer surgeon Michael Baum:

http://breast-cancer-research.com/content/9/S2/S10

Here is a quote involving crystal therapy:

QUOTE
It is therefore not an option to have an open mind about homeopathy or similarly implausible forms of alternative/complementary medicine, for example Bach Flower remedies, spiritual healing and crystal therapy.
UNQUOTE

Here is one debunking acupuncture by the Yale University Neurologist Steven Novella and others:

http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/reference/acupuncture/

The subheadings of this article are:

"1. Acupuncture is a pre-scientific superstition"

"2. Acupuncture lacks a plausible mechanism"

"3. Claims for efficacy are often based upon a bait-and-switch deception"

"4. Clinical trials show that acupuncture does not work"

Please let me know if you need any more accurate credible information exposing quack practices such as these.

Cheers,

Santosh



> On Sunday, January 26, 2014 2:21 PM, Dr. Ferdinando dos Reis Falc?o <drferdinando at hotmail.com> wrote:
> >
>
> Stephen Dias steve.dias60 at
> gmail.com on Sun Jan 26 02:43:40 PST 2014 posts a e-mail from Santosh Helekar
> under caption: Quackery on Herald.:
>
> Thank You Dr. Santosh.
>
> Neuroscientist,
>
> Thank You for your valuable
> comments.
>
>
>
>
> RESPONSE:
>
>
>
> Stephen and members of this Forum.
>
> I would like to clarify that Helekar's
> mail to Stephen is no better than any of our Goan politician?s explanation to
> the
> public in respect to any incident. I hope Stephen learns to be more observant
> and questioning to such replies.
>
>
> Mr. Helekar volunteers to give a
> feedback on ?crystal healing? even though Dr. Joe D?Souza sought the reaction
> and feedback from Medical Practitioners and Physicians in Goa, of which? Mr.
> Helekar is neither.
>
> In his volunteered reaction Mr.
> Helekar writes about quackery, modus operandi of quacks, blackmarketeers,
> gullible public, healers, various physical nomenclature, superstitious beliefs,
> and also cites a so called science writer?s article ( which I assume is Mr?
> Helekar?s ?credible? website as he has said before here:
> http://lists.goanet.org/pipermail/goanet-goanet.org/2013-December/236812.html).
>
>
>
> But NOWHERE does he prove that
> crystal therapy if False.
>
>